Carajillo Quemado Cupcakes

Carajillo Coffee Rum Cupcakes

Disclosure: Latinaish.com has partnered with Nestlé to bring you recipes using Nestlé products. As always, all opinions are my own.

The “Carajillo Quemado” is a classic Spanish mixed coffee drink and the inspiration for these cupcakes. Some of you may be more familiar with the Carajillos made in Mexico, which are simply a mix of espresso and Licor 43, which is often served iced, but in Spain the drink is made differently with a few variations.

There’s plenty of interesting folklore about this drink. It’s said that the word “Carajillo” derived from the Spanish word for courage (coraje), because when Spanish troops occupied Cuba, that’s exactly what they needed for combat. Still others say the name originated from the boat carriers at the French station in Barcelona. They would ask for a mixed glass of coffee and liquor instead of two separate drinks, presumably because they were in a hurry, or “que ara quillo” (“now I’m leaving in a hurry” in Catalan.) This phrase, when rushed, would sound like “caraquillo”, which is where we’d eventually got “Carajillo.”

Interesting, no?

In Spain, the simplest version of this drink is just brandy, cognac, anisette, or rum, mixed into strong black coffee – sugar optional. The “Carajillo Quemado” – or “burnt” Carajillo, is much more interesting. Sugar and alcohol along with a bit of lemon peel are mixed in a glass and lit on fire. The coffee is added to put the fire out once much of the alcohol has been burnt off and the sugar has been given a caramelized flavor. In the United States Carajillos typically have sugar around the rim of the glass and the drink is topped off with whipped cream. Cinnamon is also sometimes incorporated in both the Spanish and American versions.

I couldn’t resist developing a cupcake which combines these unique flavors, so I started with a coffee-flavored cupcake as the base. Nescafé Clásico provided the perfect roasted coffee flavor I was going for while being mild enough that it would play nicely with all the other flavors I planned to incorporate. A decadent combination of rum, coffee and buttercream was an obvious choice for the frosting, along with a pinch of fresh lemon zest.

Now for the caramelized sugar flavor. While I briefly considered sprinkling the cupcakes with sugar and rum then lighting them on fire, I decided I’m a little too accident prone to attempt it! (My eyebrows thank me.) Instead, I made caramelized sugar toppings which really gave the cupcakes an elegant touch. I’m sure any mother will appreciate if you decide to make these cupcakes for Día de Los Madres (Mother’s Day!)

Carajillo Quemado Cupcakes // Spanish Coffee Rum Cupcakes

Here’s my recipe if you decide to treat your madre (or yourself!) and then down below, enter for your chance to win a $50 gift card from Nestlé!

For additional recipes, visit ElMejorNido.com.

Carajillo Quemado Cupcakes

Ingredients:

½ cup hot water
5 teaspoons NESTLÉ® Nescafé Clásico
1 ½ cups all-pupose flour, pre-sifted
1 ¼ teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1 stick unsalted butter, cut into cubes and softened
1 cup white sugar
½ teaspoon rum
2 large eggs, separated

1 batch rum buttercream frosting (recipe below)
1 lemon, zested, for topping
caramelized sugar garnishes (recipe below)

Directions:

PREHEAT oven to 350 F. Put cupcake liners in muffin tin, set aside.

MIX Nescafé Clásico into hot water, set aside to cool.

COMBINE flour, baking powder, and salt in a medium bowl. Set aside.

BEAT butter and sugar together in a large bowl until smooth and creamy.

ADD rum to butter and sugar, then the yolks one at a time, beating after each addition.

ADD flour to the butter mixture, alternating with the cooled coffee, starting with flour and ending with flour, until well-combined.

BEAT egg whites in a separate bowl with hand mixer until soft peaks form then stir them gently into the batter.

FILL cupcake liners ¾ full with batter. Do not overfill as cupcakes will rise. Shake the pan to even out the batter.

BAKE on middle rack for 15-20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

REMOVE cupcakes to cool completely before frosting. Makes about 1 dozen cupcakes.

Tip: I used Bacardi brand light rum which is what I had on hand, but many bakers prefer gold or dark rum; you can use any of those in this recipe.

Coffee Rum-flavored Carajillo Quemado Cupcakes

Buttercream Rum Frosting for Carajillo Quemado Cupcakes

Ingredients:

3 cups confectioners’ sugar
1 cup unsalted butter, slightly softened
1 teaspoon imitation rum extract
1 tablespoon NESTLÉ® CARNATION® Evaporated Milk
1 teaspoon NESTLÉ® Nescafé Clásico

Directions:

BEAT sugar and butter until creamy.

ADD rum extract and beat until combined.

MIX Nescafé Clásico crystals into evaporated milk until completely dissolved, then add to the frosting mixture, beating until combined.

FROST cooled cupcakes using a pastry bag and tip as desired.

TOP each cupcake with a pinch of fresh lemon zest and a caramelized sugar garnish. Keep refrigerated until serving.

Tip: As cinnamon is sometimes incorporated into Carajillos, feel free to add a tiny dash of ground cinnamon to your frosted cupcakes as well!

Carajillo Quemado Cupcakes

Caramelized Sugar Garnish for Carajillo Quemado Cupcakes

Ingredients:

1 cup white sugar

Directions:

HEAT sugar over medium heat in a large frying pan.

WAIT for most of the sugar to melt and become almost amber in color before stirring. Be patient as this process can take several minutes. Avoid the temptation to stir or turn the heat higher. While waiting, lay parchment paper out on a nearby clean kitchen counter.

STIR the melted, caramelized sugar with a wooden spoon, being careful to remove from heat before it burns.

USE a metal spoon to carefully drizzle small amounts of the caramelized sugar onto a parchment paper-covered surface, in whatever design desired. You must work somewhat quickly as the caramelized sugar in the pan will begin to harden.

Caramelized Sugar Toppings

WHEN cool the caramelized sugar designs will harden and you will be able to pick them up from the parchment paper. Use these as an edible garnish for your frosted cupcakes.

Caramelized Sugar Toppings

Tip: Because of the burn dangers of working with hot, melted sugar, make sure that pets and children are not in the kitchen while preparing caramelized sugar garnishes. If the remaining caramelized sugar hardens in your frying pan, you can remove it by simply adding a little water and heating it back up.

Coffee Rum Cupcakes

Giveaway Details

Prize description: One lucky winner will receive a $50 gift card.

How to enter: Just leave a comment below telling me what you love most about your mother or another woman you admire. (Please read official rules below before entering.)

Official Rules: No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years of age or older to enter. You must be able to provide a U.S. address for prize shipment. Your name and address will only be shared with the PR agency responsible for prize fulfillment for that purpose. Please no P.O. Boxes. One entry per household. Make sure that you enter a valid email address in the email address field so you can be contacted if you win. Winner will be selected at random. Winner has 24 hours to respond. If winner does not respond within 24 hours, a new winner will be selected at random. Giveaway entries are being accepted between April 22, 2015 through April 27th, 2015. Entries received after April 27th, 2015 at 11:59 pm EST, will not be considered. The number of eligible entries received determines the odds of winning. If you win, by accepting the prize, you are agreeing that Latinaish.com assumes no liability for damages of any kind. By entering your name below you are agreeing to these Official Rules. Void where prohibited by law.

Buena suerte / Good luck!

Flor de Toloache

flor

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Durante el último par de años Jenny Schweitzer ha trabajado en la creación de Rhythm in Motion, una serie documental en 10 partes cortas que retrata a músicos del metro de Nueva York en colaboración con la Autoridad Metropolitana de Transporte. Las películas están siendo publicadas en The Atlantic. La primera película, Flor de Toloache, cuenta con una banda de mariachis exclusivamente femenina que desafía las normas tradicionales del género. Me encanta!

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

For the past couple of years Jenny Schweitzer has worked on creating Rhythm in Motion, a 10-part short documentary series portraying NYC’s subway musicians in collaboration with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. The films are now being published on The Atlantic. The first film, Flor de Toloache, features an all-female mariachi band that challenges traditional gender norms. I love this so much!

Ancestry DNA: Part 2

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(Image source)

Because a few friends have expressed interest and asked me a million questions about this process, I decided I’d do a two part blog post about it. The first one is about taking the test, this second one will be about my results.

It took 22 days, much less than the 6-8 weeks Ancestry.com told me I would have to wait. When I first sent off my DNA sample, I waited impatiently. During that time I received a few emails from Ancestry. One email told me my sample had been received. I hadn’t expected an email telling me that but I appreciated it since I always worry about things getting lost in the mail. The other two or three emails they sent me were trying to convince me to sign up for an Ancestry.com account – those emails I didn’t appreciate so much, because each time I saw I had an email from them I’d feel my heart race, thinking my results were available.

So when I received the email that my results actually were available, I was kind of calm at first, thinking it was more junk mail – But then I saw the subject line: Your AncestryDNA results are in!

I clicked the email and then clicked the button that said “See my results” – Then… I had forgotten my password and was temporarily delayed logging in which made me mildly crazed.

Finally, I logged in. It’s kind of difficult to say what I felt looking at the results. Awe. Wonderment. Surprise. Curiosity. Maybe a very small amount of disappointment, sure. There were some predictable results and some shockers, too. To be honest, I’m still kind of processing it all.

tracy-ethnicity-full-screen

genetic-breakdown-tracy

tracy-ethnicity-map

The first three results weren’t surprising. According to Ancestry.com, “Europe West” is defined as:

Primarily located in: Belgium, France, Germany, Netherlands, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein

Also found in: England, Denmark, Italy, Slovenia, Czech Republic

While I wish it was more specific about which countries, I can probably safely say based on surnames (and cooking traditions!) from my mother’s side of the family in Pennsylvania, that the bulk of my “42% Europe West” blood is German.

The “European Jewish” is defined by Ancestry as:

Primarily located in: Poland, Belarus, Ukraine, Russia, Hungary, Israel

Also found in: Germany, France, Lithuania, Latvia, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Romania, Bosnia, Serbia, Estonia

This would most likely be my father’s side of the family. My Austrian-born grandmother was part of the Kindertransport during World War II. She lived in England for awhile and later immigrated to New York. Her father’s side of the family was from Poland, and her parents survived nazi concentration camps, also immigrating to the United States. My paternal grandfather’s mother immigrated to New York from Russia. This side of the family is Jewish – So again, this second result which accounts for 38% of my ethnicity is just confirmation of things my family already knows.

For those who are asking, “Wait, isn’t Judaism a religion, not an ethnicity? How can they pinpoint that genetically?” – Well, apparently Jews around the world share some common genetic ties.

The third result, 9% Irish, I expected, but for some reason I thought it would be a lot more. Maybe because my maiden name was Irish and I’m told I have Irish ancestors on both my mother’s and father’s side of the family.

The “Trace Regions” is when things get super interesting. I’ve got 4% “Great Britain” which, as defined by Ancestry.com is:

Primarily located in: England, Scotland, Wales

Also found in: Ireland, France, Germany, Denmark, Belgium, Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria, Italy

The countries listed as “Primarily located in” are not countries anyone in my family has ever laid claim to, but Germany and Austria make sense, so perhaps that’s what it is. Then again, I recently watched a documentary about The Plague. It was pretty horrific as you might expect, but I learned so much. One of the things I learned was that during this time many people, desperate for a scapegoat and an end to all the deaths, decided it was the Jews who were to blame. (They were one of many scapegoats blamed for The Plague at the time.) As a result, Jews fled Western Europe (England, France, etc.) to avoid murderous mobs. Many of the Jews fled to Poland where they were welcomed (I believe because the ruler of Poland at the time had fallen in love with a Jewish woman.) … So, who knows? Maybe one of my ancestors fled England during this time. It’s kind of crazy to imagine that far back in one’s history – beyond any oral histories that you know from living relatives or those who only died a generation or two ago.

In the “Trace Regions” category I also have 3% Europe East which could be Poland, Austria, Russia and a number of other countries, so that one made sense in the context of heritage I already know about.

Then I came to a happy surprise: 2% Iberian Peninsula! … This could be Spain or Portugal, but is also found in France, Morocco, Algeria, and Italy. None of these countries have ever been mentioned as part of my heritage and I kind of just want to claim it’s Spain and be done with it. Finally! I’m a little bit Latina!… Okay, not really, but this is still a happy surprise. Because of the Jewish blood on my father’s side of the family, I would guess it’s from my paternal line. It makes me wonder if maybe my ancestor(s) from that area were expelled from Spain when King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella issued the Alhambra Decree in 1492 (yes, the same year “Columbus sailed the ocean blue.”)

The last two “Trace Regions” are just as surprising. Less than 1% Italy/Greece and less than 1% “Caucasus” which, according to Ancestry.com is:

Primarily located in: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Turkey

Also found in: Bulgaria, Jordan, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Palestine, Romania, Turkmenistan

Because of the extremely low percentage on these last two, I imagine they could just be a fluke, but it’s fascinating if true. None of these have ever been mentioned as part of my family’s heritage. Maybe there was a traveler or two who set out for distant lands, to places where they didn’t even speak the language, and fell in love with a local. (In other words, maybe I had ancestors who did the kinds of things I’m prone to doing.) I wish I knew, but it’s fun to think about.

Now for the little bit of disappointment I mentioned. It was thought, although not proven, that there was a small amount of Native American blood on my mother’s side of the family. There’s even a photo of a great-great-great grandmother who we thought was 100% Native American, but we lacked any evidence regarding her true ethnicity.

latinaish-ancestor

The tricky thing is, the fact that “Native American” didn’t show up on my Ancestry test doesn’t necessarily mean that isn’t part of my heritage. Of course, it could absolutely mean that, but it’s possible that it just didn’t show up in my own unique genetic mix. If my mother or grandmother took the test, it could show up for them. (For more technical information on how this is possible, here’s a great little article about exactly this topic on Ancestry.)

Until older generations on my mother’s side of the family get tested, I’m going to assume that we were just wrong on this one, and that I’m not even a smidgen Native American. So there’s a little bit of mourning that. I’m not crushed or anything, but it does feel weird to find out you aren’t something you thought you were. It’s kind of like when you tried out for a sport in high school and you thought for sure you had made the cut – somehow you just KNEW it, only to find out you didn’t make the team after all… Not the best metaphor but that’s the most relatable one I can come up with at the moment.

In the end, I’m happy I took the test even if it provided just as many questions as it did answers. I’m left with an intense sense of connectedness to the world and everyone in it – not just those who now share it with me, but with all those who came before us, and those who will come after us. That alone kind of makes it worth it.

For those who are very serious and knowledgeable about genealogy and ancestry, I would probably not recommend AncestryDNA because it lacks the tools that other DNA testing websites provide, although you can upload your raw data to websites such as GEDmatch if you want to explore further. To be perfectly honest, I’ve barely dipped my toes into digging deeper into DNA results and it’s extremely technical and very confusing to me. If you just want a simple to understand result, and accept that you probably won’t get all the answers you’re looking for, then AncestryDNA is worth considering.

When we’re able to afford it, Carlos would like to be tested next since he knows almost nothing about his ancestry, so be on the lookout for a third post on this topic sometime in the future!

Salvadoran Nuégados

nuegados

Disclosure: Latinaish.com has partnered with Nestlé to bring you recipes using Nestlé products. As always, all opinions are my own.

Known as “buñuelos” in much of Latin America, El Salvador calls these traditional Easter fritters “nuégados” and they’re almost always accompanied by a toasted corn drink called “chilate.” There are many different varieties of nuégados with the most popular one being nuégados de yuca, but a Salvadoran acquaintance recently introduced me to nuégados de guineo (banana nuégados), which are much easier to make. The banana imparts a very delicate taste to the fried donuts which makes them delicious on their own, but they’re even more amazing with homemade Salvadoran “miel” (syrup) drizzled over top.

Here’s my recipe, and then down below, enter for your chance to win a $50 gift card from Nestlé!

For additional recipes, visit ElMejorNido.com.

nuegados con chilate

Salvadoran Banana Fritters / Nuégados Salvadoreños en Miel

Ingredients:
2 cups canola oil, for frying
1 cup flour
2 large ripe bananas, peeled
1/4 cup NESTLÉ® CARNATION® Evaporated Lowfat 2% Milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Directions:

COMBINE flour and bananas in a medium bowl. Use a fork or hands to mash the bananas well and mix them thoroughly into the flour.

ADD the evaporated milk, vanilla extract, and salt. Stir to combine.

DROP spoonfuls of the dough into a large pot of medium-hot oil. Use metal tongs to carefully and continuously splash oil on top of each fritter, and to turn each fritter when it becomes golden brown. Cook only a few at a time so you don’t overcrowd them.

REMOVE each fritter to drain on a paper towel-lined plate when golden brown on both sides.

SERVE warm and with syrup drizzled on top, if desired. (Makes about 1 dozen.)

nuegados salvadorenos

nuégados en miel con chilate

Salvadoran Syrup (“Miel”)

Ingredients:

14 ounces of panela or piloncillo*
3 cups water
10 whole cloves
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

*If you’re unable to find panela, or piloncillo, you can substitute 2 cups of dark brown sugar.

Directions:

COMBINE all ingredients in a medium pot over medium-high heat.

BRING to a boil, stirring occasionally. The panela will melt and break up on its own. No need to force it.

BOIL for a few minutes, stirring when necessary to keep it from boiling over.

LOWER heat and simmer for a few more minutes until the liquid thickens slightly. Dip a spoon in and watch the way it coats the spoon and drips off it. This will give you an idea of whether it has thickened a little.

REMOVE from heat and allow to cool slightly. The syrup will thicken a little bit more upon cooling.

SERVE drizzled over Salvadoran Banana Fritters. Keep any unused portion refrigerated in a jar with a tight-fitting lid.

Salvadoran fritters

***GIVEAWAY CLOSED. CONGRATULATIONS TO JAIME!***

Giveaway Details

Prize description: One lucky winner will receive a $50 gift card.

How to enter: Just leave a comment below telling me your favorite Easter food. (Please read official rules below before entering.)

Official Rules: No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years of age or older to enter. You must be able to provide a U.S. address for prize shipment. Your name and address will only be shared with the PR agency responsible for prize fulfillment for that purpose. Please no P.O. Boxes. One entry per household. Make sure that you enter a valid email address in the email address field so you can be contacted if you win. Winner will be selected at random. Winner has 24 hours to respond. If winner does not respond within 24 hours, a new winner will be selected at random. Giveaway entries are being accepted between March 30, 2015 through April 3rd, 2015. Entries received after April 3rd, 2015 at 11:59 pm EST, will not be considered. The number of eligible entries received determines the odds of winning. If you win, by accepting the prize, you are agreeing that Latinaish.com assumes no liability for damages of any kind. By entering your name below you are agreeing to these Official Rules. Void where prohibited by law.

Buena suerte / Good luck!

Espumillas

Espumillas

The other day I tried to make a Salvadoran “Torta de Yema” and it was a complete failure. The good news is that I had a bunch of egg whites left over and I used them to make espumillas, which are like the Latin American version of meringues. As you can see, I simply dropped mine by the spoonful onto the baking sheet, but if you want to be super fancy, use a pastry bag, (or even a ziploc bag with one corner cut off), to give them a prettier shape.

Espumillas

You need:

4 egg whites (cold)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cups sugar
food coloring (optional)

sprinkles and/or ground cinnamon

Method:

1. Preheat your oven to 225 F.

2. Beat whites to stiff peaks.

3. Mix in sugar little by little.

4. Add vanilla extract and food coloring. (If you want to make several different colors, separate the mixture into a few bowls before adding the colors.)

5. On a parchment-lined baking sheet, drop spoonfuls of the mixture. You can put them close together because they won’t spread but make them no larger than about an inch and a half in diameter. If your espumilla is too large, it won’t properly bake/dry in the middle.

6. Sprinkle with sprinkles or ground cinnamon. (I find the sprinkles prettier but the cinnamon ones, not pictured, were tastier.)

7. Bake for 1 hour. Do not open the oven door. After one hour, turn the oven off. Leave the espumillas in the oven while it cools down for at least two hours.

8. Break one open. Espumillas should be shiny outside, dry in the middle with a crunchy texture, and sweet candy-like flavor. Enjoy!

Ancestry DNA: Part 1

ancestry-dna-test-1

Because a few friends have expressed interest and asked me a million questions about this process, I decided I’d do a two part blog post about it. This first one is about taking the test, the second one will be about my results, (which at the time of this writing, I have not yet received.)

First let me just be clear that this DNA test is not a paternity test. A friend of mine joked that Carlos requested this test be done and referenced the cumbia song “Capullo y Sorullo.” — So in case you’re anticipating a Maury Povitch “you are not the father” type of moment, it isn’t that kind of DNA test. This is an ANCESTRY DNA test which will tell me more about where both my mother’s and father’s bloodlines come from.

___

Years ago I heard about DNA tests which could tell an individual more about their heritage. I wanted to order one but the tests were way too expensive, and so it’s one of those things I put on my wishlist “for later.”

However, I’m excited to say that “for later” finally came this month!

I discovered that Ancestry.com has a DNA test that was much more affordable than the original one and several friends had already tried it and recommended it. So I asked Carlos if this could be my early birthday present, and he agreed. I ordered my Ancestry DNA test online and then waited. About a week later the small white box arrived in my mailbox.

I opened it up to check out the contents.

ancestry-dna-kit-contents

As you can see, the package contained just a few things: an easy to understand instruction booklet, a collection tube which includes 2 different tops [I’ll explain in a minute], a little ziploc bag, and a pre-paid mailing box to ship the DNA sample back to them for testing.

Seems easy enough, but I was worried I’d do something wrong so I waited for Carlos just to have a second pair of eyes to read the instructions with me, (which is a good thing because I actually ended up needing his help physically thanks to my carpal tunnel-weakened hands.)

So, here are the instructions, page by page.

ancestry-dna-booklet-steps

Basically, you first need to find your unique ID number on the tube and register it on their website, (I blurred mine out in the photo but it’s just above the UPC code.) Registering is super important otherwise you won’t be able to get your results. For good measure, write your unique code down in the booklet. If more than one family member is doing this test at once with their own individual kits, I recommend doing them one-by-one so that nothing gets mixed up. (Carlos didn’t do one with me, but we hope to do his sometime this year.)

Once you’re registered, open the sterile package containing the plastic “collection tube.”

What will you be collecting? Saliva… as in spit. You put the funnel-shaped top on the collection tube and start spitting… They say to go to the black line on the tube. Doing this reminded me of that lollipop commercial and the boy who asks the owl, “How many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie Roll Pop?” … except instead of licks it was spit.

One…(patooey!)
Two…(patooey!)
Three…(patooey!)

I kept spitting and spitting and Carlos kept saying it wasn’t enough. I felt like a llama with dry mouth. Just when I was ready to get the bottle of Tajín to help me out, Carlos declared that I had spit enough. (Sorry, no photos of my spit in the tube. I know you’re thoroughly disappointed.)

By the way, the Tajín was only going to be for smelling in the hopes that in would induce my mouth to water. When you do this test you aren’t supposed to have had anything to eat or drink at least 30 minutes before.

Once the tube had a sufficient amount of spit, I removed the funnel top and tried to follow the directions to replace it with the screw-on top filled with blue liquid to seal it. I had a very difficult time twisting the top on securely enough and was afraid I was going to break the tube, but the instructions said that when it’s screwed on properly, all the blue liquid will flow from the top into the tube, and that hadn’t happened. Carlos managed to get the top on and the blue “stabilizing liquid” flowed down into the spit-filled tube. I shook the tube for five seconds as instructed then put it into the ziploc bag.

The ziploc bag containing the spit-filled tube then goes into the pre-paid mailing box and you send it back for testing. Now the wait begins! In 6-8 weeks I should receive an email with my results. I’m anxious to see if there will be anything unexpected to share with you, (and my family), but until then, we wait.

For more information or to order your own Ancestry DNA kit, visit DNA.Ancestry.com.

Helpful Tip: I used coupon code FREESHIPDNA when I ordered online. I’m not sure if it’s still valid, but you’ll want to give it a try as it’ll save you almost $10.

Disclosure: Just in case you’re wondering, I’m in no way affiliated with Ancestry.com. This is not a sponsored post. I was not given anything free to review or any compensation. This is just something I wanted to try and share with all of you. As always, all opinions are my own.

Fresqui-Top

Fresqui-Top

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Recibí un email de una lectora con la pregunta: “¿Qué es fresqueto? Mi esposo salvadoreño me dijo que es una bebida popular con los niños en El Salvador pero cuando fuimos a la tienda él me enseñó un bote de Kool-Aid.”

Bueno, primero pensé que ella malentendió la palabra “refresquito” pero para asegurarme, pregunté a Carlos. Inmediatamente Carlos respondió, “Ah, ella quiere decir Fresqui-Top.”

Aparentemente es una bebida con sabores de fruta que viene en paquetes de polvo igual que Kool-Aid. Eso bebía Carlos en El Salvador cuando era niño.

¿Recuerdas Fresqui-Top?

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

I received an email from a reader with the question: “What’s ‘fresqueto’? My Salvadoran husband told me it’s a popular drink with kids in El Salvador but when we went to the store he showed me a canister of Kool-Aid.”

Well, at first I thought she had misunderstood the word “refresquito” (a little refreshment/drink) but to make sure, I asked Carlos. Immediately Carlos responded, “Oh, she means Fresqui-Top.”

Apparently Fresqui-Top is a powdered drink that comes in packets of various fruit flavors just like Kool-Aid. This is what Carlos drank in El Salvador when he was a boy.

Do you remember Fresqui-Top?

(Image source)