Huaraches … to eat?

(image source: shoesmitten.com)

While browsing the Latin American “panes” aisle, I came upon a new bread I had never seen before – Huaraches.

I’ve always known “huaraches” (or “guaraches”) to be a type of sandal/chancla.

I had no idea there was a bread of the same name. Huaraches – the bread, were named after huaraches the sandal because of the shape. Chécalo!

While looking up more information online, I found that there’s a large taco-like dish called “Huarache” which seems to be made out of a larger elongated tortilla, too.

(image source: Un Terrícola extraño )

Of course, I now went on a mission to find and eat one. Weeks later I found my first huarache at a little Mexican restaurant tucked into a strip mall in northern Virginia.

Delicioso! Have you tried “huarache” the bread or “huarache” the taco-like dish? Tell me about it in comments – and if you have a recipe, mucho mejor!

Posted on November 8, 2011, in Culture, food/drink. Bookmark the permalink. 23 Comments.

  1. Yes! I’ve had them at a Mexican restaurant I go to a lot in Hyattsville (MD) called La Sirenita. But if you’re ever in their area I highly recommend their chiles rellenos.

    • Haven’t tried that place. Will definitely stop by for chiles rellenos one of these days. Thanks for the recommendation!

  2. Yes! I had them in Hidalgo a couple of years ago. But they were made from corn as opposed to flour, more like a gordita. Huge! Very tasty and very filling. Great, now I’m starving!

  3. I love Huaraches!! all of them lol there is a huaracheria in my hometown that makes the best huaraches! sooooo good!!! It’s more like an stretched out “sope”. I like them with beans, chicken, lettuce, sour cream and lots of chile!!!

  4. Ya tengo hambre, Tracy! Qué rico!

  5. As I was reading the intro, the first thought I had was the taco/sopes looking ones that you mention towards the end.

    They are pretty good. I usually eat them when I go to Mexico, but you don’t want to see how they are made. Trust me. LOL. It involves a lot of lard. At least when I saw it.

  6. We have eaten huaraches (the dish), in fact my husband orders it whenever available. Probably the best he’s had were in a market in Mexico City bur certainly we have found a few good ones stateside.

  7. I’ve never seen bread like that but yes huaraches from cornmeal I have seen and eaten and yummm! just use maseca if you don’t have a tortilleria that will sell you the corn masa by the lb…shape them and fry them and top them and enjoy!

  8. It was a bad idea to read this on an empty stomach! Those huaraches look delish.

    • I know! I made myself hungry re-reading it before publishing. LOL. That photo, (not the one I took – the one of the 3 huaraches), is especially torturous.

  9. Since I discovered your blog yesterday I am totally addicted…I’m reading all your posts here at work but I have to be sly about it! Anyways, 90 percent of why I’m reading this is because you are funny…the other 10 percent because I am living vicariously thru you. You live in or around D.C. ( I forgot which) which is my dream and you married a Latino immigrant…my lost love lives there and is an immigrant. So basically yeah you are living the life I want :) sad but true! keep it up!!

    • Thanks for taking a minute to leave a comment. I’m happy to contribute to your loss of productivity at work ;) I totally “get” living vicariously through others. I have to do that whenever friends make trips abroad because we so rarely get to do that.

      As for living *in* DC —- I wish! We don’t have that kind of dinero. LOL. I was born and raised about 30 minutes from DC and a few years ago my husband and I moved further out because we couldn’t afford to stay, (well, we could, but quality of housing/area would have suffered and we didn’t want that for the kids.)

      Right now we’re about an hour and a half away but still drive into the city at least once a month or more. It would be my dream to live in DC too, surrounded by culture/museums, etc., walking distance to the Metro and have the kids attending a bilingual school. And while we’re talking wild fantasies, I wish I also had enough money to travel freely to El Salvador and elsewhere multiple times each year – maybe even own a permanent residence there where we’d spend the summers.

      As for your lost love – I’m sorry to hear that. I hope you’ll still have a happy ending someday soon.

  10. Guess they are pure Mexican. Hubby affirms nothing like that in El Salvador. Too bad for me because they look delicious. Both the bread and the food.

  11. *LOL* Wondering if la palabra “huarache” predates the invention of la chancla, or vice-versa? Bet it’s some Meso-American word for an oval or plancha. Too funny. Regardless, I want to try one of those tostada-looking thingies. Yum …

    • You’re so smart, Ezzy! :)

      From Wikipedia: “The word Huarache is originally form Purepecha or Tarascan[1] and the Nahuatl word for huarache is kwarachi.”

      And you’re right – it would be more accurate to compare them to a tostada than a taco!

  12. Yes, I had one just a few weeks ago at a Mexican restaurant. I had never had one before, but it was pretty good. Like what I call a tostada, but long, and I think there was lettuce on top instead of repollo.

  13. When I saw this and started reading I was like wait! but there are also huaraches the sope- like food too!!! and then lo and behold I continue reading this and there it is, the delicious huarache. WHERE in NOVA did you find this little restaurant? Hay montones de salvadoreños en NOVA pero nada de mexicanos. All of the MX restos I found near my locale are mexican de nombre sólo and really Salvadoran. I would LOVE to go eat huaraches wherever you went, from your pics it looks like la mera cosa. Back in mi patria de tejas, huaraches are food truck fare. How I do miss home!

    • Sorry this is Northern, NORTHERN Virginia – as in Winchester – as I explained in my E-mail to you. Hopefully you’ll be able to come up and try them!

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