Desafío aceptado: Tamales Salvadoreños

Image source: Flickr user Doran

Image source: Flickr user Doran

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation in italics!

La primera vez que comí un tamal salvadoreño de gallina, te digo la verdad, no me gustó. Si uno está acostombrado a los tamales mexicanos, los tamales salvadoreños se sienten muy ligosos y mojados en comparación. Con masa que tiene una textura que me recuerda a gelatina, y un olor único gracias a las hojas de plátano en que están doblados, nunca me enamoré de los tamales salvadoreños y entonces, tampoco traté de hacerlos… hasta ahora.

No sé por qué pero por unas semanas he tenido un antojo por los tamales salvadoreños de gallina que hace mi suegra, llenos de pollo, papas, y garbanzos. Ya que mi suegra no está aquí con nosotros, tengo que tratar de hacerlos solita. Entre las memorias de Carlos y yo, más unas recetas para guiarnos, vamos a hacer tamales este fin de semana. ¡Deséenos suerte!

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Challenge Accepted: Salvadoran Tamales

The first time I ate a Salvadoran chicken tamal, I’ll tell you the truth, I didn’t like it. If one is accustomed to Mexican tamales, the Salvadoran tamales feel slimy and wet in comparison. With a texture that reminds me of Jell-O, and a unique smell thanks to the plantain leaves they’re folded into, I never fell in love with Salvadoran tamales, and so I never tried to make them… until now.

I don’t know why but for the past few weeks I’ve had a craving for the Salvadoran chicken tamales my mother-in-law used to make, full of chicken, potato and garbanzo beans. Since my mother-in-law isn’t here with us, I have to try to make them myself. Between Carlos and my memories, plus some recipes to guide us, we will try to make tamales this weekend. Wish us luck!

Posted on December 13, 2013, in Culture, en español, food/drink, Language, Salvadoreños, Spanish Friday. Bookmark the permalink. 11 Comments.

  1. Nina Segovia (Thurmes) (de Arizona)

    Buena suerte Tracy! Mi mama los hace muy ricos pero yo nunca he tratado de hacerlos. Avisanos como les fue.

  2. Salvadoran tamales and pupusas (combo plate!) were my introduction to Salvadoran cuisine at the lovely Costa del Sol restaurant in my hometown. I loved the soft moistness of the masa in the tamales. Attempting to make them at home is far above my cooking skill level. Tengo celos! Enjoy your tamales!

  3. ¿Q es “ligoso”?

    • “ligoso” is a word for “slimy” (at least in El Salvador!)

      • Buenos dias. La primera vez que intenté hacer tamales….tuve que usar una una pajilla por lo líquido que me quedaron! y “tomarlos” en un vaso …

      • Ay no! Y te diste cuenta de lo que hiciste mal? Ojalá no me pasará a mí también! … Es mucho trabajo, tiempo y ingredientes. Será triste si los tamales no salen bien.

  4. Buena suerte amigua!…mi esposa requested “tamales,” and my immediate thought was, Salvi tamales, of course! Pero queria Mexican tamales, which I am not too fond of myself. I think I will have to deny her request, cause they both seem to need a team of cooks to prepare! I know you can do it though!

    • I prefer Mexican tamales most of the time (I like the drier texture and the flavor the corn husk imparts), but I’m going to give this a go! … Oh, and Mexican tamales are much easier plus there are plenty of recipes online. The pre-cooked masa and use of banana leaves makes the Salvadoran ones more complicated. We’ll see what happens! Thanks for your vote of confidence :)

  5. I love Salvadoran tamales and actually prefer them to Mexican ones. I like the platano leaves. I recently tried a different chicken version, that is a little sweet because there is cinnamon in the dough.

    • Interesting! I’ve never had them with cinnamon but I know many recipes for the recaudo (sauce) uses a spice mixture that includes cloves.

  6. Los Mexicanos tambien tenemos tamales en hoja d platano, por ejemplo Oaxaca o Yucatán que es de donde yo soy, aqui no conocemos el de hoja de maiz

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