Tocayos

tocayos

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Recientemente una amiga me recordó de una palabra interesante en español – “tocayo”.

Tocayo, (o “tocaya” para las hembras), es una palabra que te puedes llamar a alguien con el mismo nombre que tienes. Por ejemplo, si tengo una amiga que se llama “Tracy” – puedo llamarla “tocaya” porque mi nombre también es “Tracy”. Algunos creen que la palabra viene de la palabra náhuatl “tocayotl” que significa “nombre”.

La razón que me acordé de esta palabra es porque una amiga gringa me preguntó si alguna vez había oído hablar de fiestas en Latinoamérica para personas con el mismo nombre. Nunca he oído hablar de esto, así que quería preguntar a todos ustedes – ¿Existe tal cosa como una “Fiesta de Tocayos”?

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Recently a friend of mine reminded me of an interesting word in Spanish – “tocayo.”

“Tocayo” – (or “tocaya” for females) – is a word you can use to call someone who has the same name that you have. For example, if I have a friend named “Tracy” – I can call her “tocaya” because my name is also “Tracy.” Some people believe the word comes from the Nahuatl “tocayotl” which means “name.”

The reason I remembered this word is because a gringa friend of mine asked if I had ever heard of parties for people of the same name in Latin America. I had never heard of this, so I wanted to ask all of you – Do traditional parties for “tocayos” exist?

9 thoughts on “Tocayos

  1. I didn’t know this word and I don’t know any other language that has a term for this. Funny! The picture had me laughing out loud. I remember working in a call centre and trying to search a caller’s info by last name because he had lost his reward card. Yeah, good luck finding the right Singh in Toronto :lol:

    • LOL. Do you know, when I married Carlos and took the last name “Lopez” – I had no idea how common the name was. I also thought that the combination of the Anglo name “Tracy” along with the Spanish “Lopez” would be uncommon —- I was very wrong! There are so many people with my name that I kind of wish I had combined Lopez with my maiden name.

  2. Tocayo means namesake, and it is used quite frequently by Los Boricuas. Se puede debatir los origines de la palabra, but I have used it a lot since I learned it many years ago.

    • Hi Rob! Yes, “namesake” is the best translation of “tocayo” but “tocayo” is used so differently and more liberally in some Latin American countries, don’t you think? … I mean in English we don’t go around calling someone “namesake. ”

      Thanks for your comment!

    • I agree that your definition of “namesake” is by far the most accepted. Strangely, dictionary.com gives a second definition as simply “someone with the same name.” I don’t agree with dictionary.com on that one because being someone’s “namesake” is a bit more specific than that.

      Can’t wait to check out your post!

  3. Querida amiga, en nuestra latinoamércia hay fiestas para todo, no dudo que haya fiestas de tocayos, aunque nunca asistí a una!!

  4. According to my Honduran boo, this is not a ‘thing’ in Honduras, but then again Latinos have a party for everything (which I love!), so it might show up there soon!

    A lot of Hondurans go by their middle names since first names tend to repeat a lot. Currently people are giving their kids ‘creative’ names and my god, is it hard to remember those.

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