Aprender hablar portugués es fácil pero peligroso

(Image source:  Adrien Sifre )

(Image source: Adrien Sifre )

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Gracias a la Copa del Mundo, Carlos está muy interesado en aprender hablar portugués. Como dije a Carlos, aprender hablar portugués cuando uno ya habla español es fácil porque hay muchos cognados, (o sea, palabras que se ven y suenan semejantes en ambas lenguas.)

Ejemplos: corazón es coração, mujer es mulher, muchas es muitas, buenos días mis amigos es bom dia meus amigos.

Fácil, ¿verdad?

Pero ojo con los “falsos amigos“, (palabras que parecen semejantes pero no lo son!) Por ejemplo:

PORTUGUÉS: aceite
ESPAÑOL: aceptado

PORTUGUÉS: ano
ESPAÑOL: año

PORTUGUÉS: azar
ESPAÑOL: mala suerte

PORTUGUÉS: bocadinho
ESPAÑOL: poquito, momentito

PORTUGUÉS: cena
ESPAÑOL: escena

PORTUGUÉS: gozar
ESPAÑOL: burlarse, tomar el pelo

PORTUGUÉS: osso
ESPAÑOL: hueso

PORTUGUÉS: pila
ESPAÑOL: pene

PORTUGUÉS: puto
ESPAÑOL: niño, crío

PORTUGUÉS: salsa
ESPAÑOL: perejil

PORTUGUÉS: todavia
ESPAÑOL: no obstante

PORTUGUÉS: trampa
ESPAÑOL: excremento

PORTUGUÉS: vassoura
ESPAÑOL: escoba

Para más consejos sobre aprender a hablar portugués, recomiendo este entrada y esta página en Wikipedia. ¡Buena suerte!

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Title: Learning to Speak Portuguese is Easy but Dangerous

Thanks to the World Cup, Carlos is really interested in learning to speak Portuguese. As I told Carlos, learning to speak Portuguese when one already speaks Spanish is easy because there are a lot of cognates, (words that look and sound similar in both languages.)

Examples: corazón is coração, mujer is mulher, muchas is muitas, buenos días mis amigos is bom dia meus amigos.

Easy, right?

But watch out for “false friends” (false cognates), which are words that look the same but aren’t the same at all! For example:

PORTUGUESE: aceite
[looks like "oil" in Spanish, but means "accepted"]

PORTUGUESE: ano
[looks like "anus" in Spanish, but means "year"]

PORTUGUESE: azar
[looks like "random" in Spanish, but means "bad luck"]

PORTUGUESE: bocadinho
[looks like "sandwich" or "snack" in Spanish, but means "a little bit" or "little moment"]

PORTUGUESE: cena
[looks like "dinner" in Spanish, but means "scene"]

PORTUGUESE: gozar
[looks like "to enjoy" in Spanish, but means "to make fun of"]

PORTUGUESE: osso
[looks like "bear" in Spanish, but means "bone"]

PORTUGUESE: pila
[looks like "pile" or "battery" in Spanish, but means "penis"]

PORTUGUESE: puto
[looks like "faggot" or "man whore" in Spanish, but means "child"]

PORTUGUESE: salsa
[looks like "sauce" in Spanish, but means "parsley"]

PORTUGUESE: todavia
[looks like "still" in Spanish, but means "nonetheless"]

PORTUGUESE: trampa
[looks like "trap" in Spanish, but means "excrement"]

PORTUGUESE: vassoura
[looks like "trash" in Spanish, but means "broom"]

For more advice on how to learn to speak Portuguese, I recommend this post and this Wikipedia page. Good luck!

3 thoughts on “Aprender hablar portugués es fácil pero peligroso

  1. Still, Portuguese and Spanish are remarkably similar to one another, and mutual intelligibility is high between both. The closest pair of romance languages for sure.

  2. Puto es peligroso en portugués . En Brasil puto es un hombre prostituto , tiene sexo con mujeres y otros hombres. En Angola es chico mismo.

Note: You are not required to sign in to leave a comment. Please feel free to leave the email and/or website fields blank for an easier commenting experience.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s