De Tin Marín de do pingüé

Image source: Flickr user trpnblies7

Image source: Flickr user trpnblies7

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

En inglés tenemos dos canciones infantiles muy populares entre niños para elegir algo/alguien. La primera es así:

One potato, two potato, three potato, four,
five potato, six potato, seven potato, more.

Y la otra es así:

Eenie meenie, miney mo,
Catch a tiger by its toe,
If he hollers, let him go,
eenie meenie, miney mo.

(Verso opcional:) My mom said to pick the very best one and you are not it.

Cuando canté “eenie meenie” el otro día para elegir un cereal para el desayuno, (a veces soy muy indecisa y eso me ayuda), Carlos me cantó la versión de “eenie menie” que cantan los niños en El Salvador, (y muchos otros paises.)

De tin marín de dó pingüé,
cuca la mácara títere fue,
yo no fui, fue teté,
pégale, pégale que ella fue.

Puedes oír una versión de “tin marín” en esta canción de Los Tucanes de Tijuana. (El cantante está cantando sobre sus cinco novias y su método de elegir una por salir a comer, bailar, etc.)

Y aprendí esta versión que cantan en España (Fuente: WordReference):

Pito, pito, gorgorito
donde vas tú tan bonito
a la acera verdadera
pim, pom, fuera.

También aprendí esta versión de Argentina:

Ta, te, ti,
suerte para tí,
virgencita de Itatí,
chocolate con maní,
afuera saliste tú.

Conoces otra canción en inglés o español que utilizan los niños para elegir?

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

In English we have two popular childhood songs that are used by children to choose something/someone. The first goes like this:

One potato, two potato, three potato, four,
five potato, six potato, seven potato, more.

The other goes like this:

Eenie meenie, miney mo,
Catch a tiger by its toe,
If he hollers, let him go,
eenie meenie, miney mo.

(Optional verse:) My mom said to pick the very best one and you are not it.

When I sang “eenie meenie” the other day while trying to choose a breakfast cereal, (sometimes I’m indecisive and this helps me), Carlos sang me the Salvadoran version of “eenie menie”, (which is used in many other countries, too.)

De tin marín de dó pingüé,
cuca la mácara títere fue,
yo no fui, fue teté,
pégale, pégale que ella fue.

You can hear a version of “tin marín” in this song by Los Tucanes de Tijuana. (The singer is singing about his five girlfriends and his method for choosing which one to take out to dinner, dancing, etc.)

And I learned this version they sing in Spain (Source: WordReference):

Pito, pito, gorgorito
donde vas tú tan bonito
a la acera verdadera
pim, pom, fuera.

I also learned this version from Argentina:

Ta, te, ti,
suerte para tí,
virgencita de Itatí,
chocolate con maní,
afuera saliste tú.

Do you know another song in English or Spanish that children use for choosing?

7 thoughts on “De Tin Marín de do pingüé

  1. Hey Latinaish! My dad is actually related to the main singer of los Tucanes de Tijuana. They
    are cousins. Funny, right! My father is from Sinaloa, Mexico and he remembers playing with him when he was small. But we don’t talk to them, or rather they don’t talk to us.

    • Jaja! Small world. I’m a big fan of the music of Sinaloa. (That’s where Espinoza Paz is from too.)

      That’s too bad they don’t talk to you guys anymore, but I unfortunately know how that goes. It’s sad when family members don’t see a need to keep in touch.

      • I know right! But to be honest I’m not a big fan of Banda/Norteno music haha. Although the history of both Mexican music genres is very interesting. German immigrants in Mexico influenced the music by bringing their instruments (like the accordion) and if you listen closely it sort of sounds like polka! However I do love Mariachi , Mexican pop singers like Kalimba, Reik, Camila, Thalia) You should listen to them I’m sure you will fall in love! And also Jarocho, which I barely came to know. La Bamba is an example of this type of music, and was already being sung in Mexico by Mexicans of Afro descent when the Spanish brought Afro slaves to Mexico! Its amazing how much history can be behind all types of music! :) Saludos!

      • Oh! And I can’t forget my Rancheras! lol You should listen to them! Some famous ones include (Cielito Lindo, Amorcito Corazon, CuCurucucu Paloma, Amor eterno) I promise you will love them! :p Son todos canciones para los enamorados!

      • I listen to and love Banda/Norteno, Ranchera, Mariachi, Jarocho, Mexican Cumbia, Tribal, Chicano rap … todo, todo, todo! … I listen to some Mexican pop and rock, but I’m really picky, (not really into Thalia, for example.)

        You can check out the music I like by visiting my Pandora stations: http://www.pandora.com/profile/Latinaish

  2. Loved today’s blog. Brought back memories and it was interesting to hear how other countries decide.

Note: You are not required to sign in to leave a comment. Please feel free to leave the email and/or website fields blank for an easier commenting experience.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s