Quesadillas

quesadillas

I’m hesitant to even publish this as a “recipe” because it’s just basically melted cheese inside a tortilla, but I’m doing this as a service to those who may be totally unfamiliar with the process and have yet to experience the happiness that is a simple homemade Mexican quesadilla. (Salvadoran quesadillas are equally wonderful, but an entirely different food and a bit more complicated to make. My recipe for those can be found here.)

Quesadillas

What you need:

Tortillas (I prefer white corn)
Cheese (Oaxaca cheese is authentic, but a pre-shredded “Mexican” blend is what I use)
A comal/griddle or large non-stick frying pan
Cholula hot sauce (optional)

Note: This recipe is for the most basic of quesadillas and I love them like this, but feel free to add in whatever you have on hand – some leftover shredded chicken, beans, slices of pickled jalapeño, etc. The possible combinations are only limited by your imagination.

Directions:

1. Heat up the comal, griddle or non-stick frying pan. Do not add oil or butter – It should be nice and dry.

2. Place two tortillas on the comal. Allow to slightly “toast” on one side. Flip both tortillas over.

3. Place a handful of cheese on one of the tortillas. Put the tortilla without any cheese on top. Allow the cheese to melt and remove from heat. Cut in half with a pizza cutter. Repeat as necessary. Optional: Serve with Cholula hot sauce.

Note: Another method (and the more authentic way) is to put cheese on each tortilla and fold in half. I find that doing it this way makes some of the shredded cheese fall out onto my comal and burn, so that’s why I use the other method.

De Tin Marín de do pingüé

Image source: Flickr user trpnblies7

Image source: Flickr user trpnblies7

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

En inglés tenemos dos canciones infantiles muy populares entre niños para elegir algo/alguien. La primera es así:

One potato, two potato, three potato, four,
five potato, six potato, seven potato, more.

Y la otra es así:

Eenie meenie, miney mo,
Catch a tiger by its toe,
If he hollers, let him go,
eenie meenie, miney mo.

(Verso opcional:) My mom said to pick the very best one and you are not it.

Cuando canté “eenie meenie” el otro día para elegir un cereal para el desayuno, (a veces soy muy indecisa y eso me ayuda), Carlos me cantó la versión de “eenie menie” que cantan los niños en El Salvador, (y muchos otros paises.)

De tin marín de dó pingüé,
cuca la mácara títere fue,
yo no fui, fue teté,
pégale, pégale que ella fue.

Puedes oír una versión de “tin marín” en esta canción de Los Tucanes de Tijuana. (El cantante está cantando sobre sus cinco novias y su método de elegir una por salir a comer, bailar, etc.)

Y aprendí esta versión que cantan en España (Fuente: WordReference):

Pito, pito, gorgorito
donde vas tú tan bonito
a la acera verdadera
pim, pom, fuera.

También aprendí esta versión de Argentina:

Ta, te, ti,
suerte para tí,
virgencita de Itatí,
chocolate con maní,
afuera saliste tú.

Conoces otra canción en inglés o español que utilizan los niños para elegir?

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

In English we have two popular childhood songs that are used by children to choose something/someone. The first goes like this:

One potato, two potato, three potato, four,
five potato, six potato, seven potato, more.

The other goes like this:

Eenie meenie, miney mo,
Catch a tiger by its toe,
If he hollers, let him go,
eenie meenie, miney mo.

(Optional verse:) My mom said to pick the very best one and you are not it.

When I sang “eenie meenie” the other day while trying to choose a breakfast cereal, (sometimes I’m indecisive and this helps me), Carlos sang me the Salvadoran version of “eenie menie”, (which is used in many other countries, too.)

De tin marín de dó pingüé,
cuca la mácara títere fue,
yo no fui, fue teté,
pégale, pégale que ella fue.

You can hear a version of “tin marín” in this song by Los Tucanes de Tijuana. (The singer is singing about his five girlfriends and his method for choosing which one to take out to dinner, dancing, etc.)

And I learned this version they sing in Spain (Source: WordReference):

Pito, pito, gorgorito
donde vas tú tan bonito
a la acera verdadera
pim, pom, fuera.

I also learned this version from Argentina:

Ta, te, ti,
suerte para tí,
virgencita de Itatí,
chocolate con maní,
afuera saliste tú.

Do you know another song in English or Spanish that children use for choosing?

On Fictional Immigrants, Accents & Why We Like What We Like

I’ve mentioned my love for Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz) and his accent, on more than one occasion, but yesterday a thought occurred to me – a sort of, “Which came first? The chicken or the egg?” sort of question. I wondered, was it already pre-programmed within me to like accents and Ricky Ricardo just happened to be the first to ignite it? – Or was there something about Ricky Ricardo that created a preference for that specific quality?

Whether it’s accents or ice cream flavors, who can really say why we like what we like? Maybe a psychologist or brain specialist of some sort would be able to explain this better – I’m not really prepared to delve into that today, or probably ever.

What I do want to talk about are fictional immigrants in film and television, as well as actors putting on an accent which is not native to them, because these are stories and characters I’m very often drawn to. There’s a fine line between creating an authentic character and one that reinforces stereotypes, but I’ve had some favorites over the years. Here they are in no particular order.

Actor Bronson Pinchot played the very loveable Balki Bartokomous on the sitcom Perfect Strangers. Balki was supposed to be from a fictional island in the Mediterranean Sea called Mypos. Pinchot is an American actor born in New York.

Actor Tom Hanks played Viktor Navorski of the fictional country Krakozhia in the movie, The Terminal. Tom Hanks was originally born in California, and you probably already know what his regular speaking voice sounds like.

Actor Adhir Kalyan played Raja Musharaff, a Pakistani exchange student sent to live with a family in Wisconsin on the TV show Aliens in America. In real life, Adhir Kalyan was born in South Africa and speaks with a lovely South African accent.

Actor Naveen Andrews played Sayid Jarrah, an Iraqi character on the TV show LOST. Andrews was actually born in London, England and is of Indian heritage. His regular speaking voice is with a British accent.

Can you think of other actors who played characters from fictional countries or who put on an accent that wasn’t their own?

¡Sonríe!

smiles-are-universal

Disclosure: Latinaish.com has partnered with Cricket Wireless as a 2014 Blog Ambassador. All opinions are my own.

I can’t resist any sort of “random acts of kindness”/”pay it forward” love-spreading-movement, so when I found out Cricket Wireless started #MissionSmile, I was totally in.

#MissionSmile is simply a mission to make others smile. That’s it! It can be an act as small as sharing a photo of your cute perrito on social media, or as big as paying for all the groceries of the person behind you in line at the store.

Here are a few things I’d like to do:

1. Hold a sign that says “Abrazos Gratis” and give away free hugs.
2. Smile at every stranger I encounter and see how many smile back.
3. Visit the dogs and cats at the Humane Society and spend time playing with them.
4. Give any overabundance from my garden to a neighbor.
5. Buy diverse children’s books and books in Spanish for my local Head Start program.

How about you? Which good deeds do you like to do? How will you make others smile?

For more from Cricket Wireless ambassadors, follow the #VidaConCricket hashtag and @MiCricket on Twitter.

Hand it Over: Cultural Differences in Giving

Image source: Ian Sane

Image source: Ian Sane

After 15 years of marriage, Carlos and I have both compromised a lot. Some of the compromises are not on personal preferences, but on cultural differences – which tend to be a bit more complicated to sort out. Sometimes the belief in the rightness of our own way of doing something is so strong that our kids are forced to navigate two different responses to the same situation, depending on which parent they’re interacting with. (Such is the life of a bi-cultural child!)

An excellent example of cultural differences Carlos and I still haven’t quite hammered out yet – the art of giving something to somebody. This may be something you do on a daily basis and you don’t think twice about how you do it – but in our household, you must.

You see, in the United States, when giving something to someone in a casual environment, (at home with one’s family), it’s quite normal to toss the item to the person requesting said item. A roll of toilet paper, a towel, a pillow, an apple, the remote control, a chancla – all of these things are appropriate for tossing. Obviously one wouldn’t toss anything that could be easily damaged or spilled, but everything else is fair game.

In El Salvador, (at least according to Carlos), such casual tossing of items is disrespectful to the person receiving the item. I can understand in formal situations. I can understand not tossing something, perhaps, to a grandmother or a visiting guest – but to close family? At home? Something completely unbreakable? Carlos believes in absolutely no tossing whatsoever of anything to anyone at any time, and gets highly offended just seeing it happen, even when he’s not involved.

This leaves my children with an unspoken set of rules to follow:

1. Tossing to mom = OK
2. Tossing to dad = forbidden
3. Tossing to mom in front of dad = forbidden

When Carlos isn’t home and the boys and I are watching T.V., I might say, “Hey, could you toss me a pillow?” – One of the boys will then literally toss me a pillow. No big deal.

When Carlos is home and we’re all gathered in the living room to watch a movie, I might make the same request. (I’m always needing pillows for some reason.) The boys, knowing Carlos is right there, will get up and hand it to me. If the boys forget and toss the pillow to me, no matter how gently, Carlos will say, “Hey! Get up and hand it to her. You know I don’t like that.” And whichever son threw it to me will have to get up, take the pillow back, and hand it to me properly.

My only other encounter with “the art of giving” was in Tae Kwon Do classes. My masters (teachers) were Korean and in Korean culture it’s also rude to toss things – particularly to someone older than yourself. Not only that, but it’s considered disrespectful and insulting to hand things to someone, or receive things from someone, with only one hand. If you’re younger, (or lower ranking in some way, like if you’re giving something to a boss), you should be holding the item with two hands when you give it to them. If the item is very small, it’s permitted to hold it in your right hand while supporting the forearm with the left hand. (This also applies to handshakes!)

What have been your experiences in “the art of giving”? What cultural differences still cause problems in your bi-cultural household?

Las Ruedas (The Rides)

fiestasagostinas

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation is in italics!

Hoy, en honor de las Fiestas Agostinas en El Salvador, ¡vamos a aprender los nombres de las ruedas en las ferias! (Los nombres abajo no son los únicos nombres para las ruedas. En inglés y español tienen muchos nombres que pueden cambiar dependiendo del país.) ¿Listos?

Today, in honor of Fiestas Agostinas in El Salvador, let’s learn the names of rides at fairs! (The names below are not the only names for the rides. In English and Spanish they have many names that can change depending on the country. Ready?

Roller Coaster = Montaña Rusa

Ferris Wheel = La Chicago

The Tagada = El Tagadá

Carousel = Carrusel (o) Los Caballitos (o) Tiovivo

Bumper Cars = Carros Chocones

Tilt-a-Whirl = Remolino Chino

The Hammer (or) Salt and Pepper Shakers = El Martillo (o) Kamikaze

Swings = Sillas Voladoras

The Pirate Ship = Barco Pirata

The Caterpillar (note, there is also a different ride called The Caterpillar) = El Gusanito

The Trabant = El Trabant

Chaos = Chaos (o) Caos

Vertigo = El Vértigo

Round up = El Satélite

¿Conoces más ruedas? ¡Compartir en los comentarios!

Do you know more rides? Share in comments!

No Tengo Sueños, Tengo Metas.

desk-before

As a member of Lowe’s Creative Ideas Network I received gift cards from Lowe’s in order to purchase supplies to complete projects. All opinions are my own.

The title of this post comes from a quote my oldest son loves. The other day at dinner he was talking about all his plans for the future. He’s an ambitious, goal-oriented, Type-A sort of guy; he’s had it all mapped out for years. He wants a career in aerospace engineering. He’s been taking AP classes since his Sophomore year of high school, he’s an honor student, he’s a member of the Science National Honor Society and other academic clubs, he keeps a folder of colleges he’s interested in applying to. He’s a driven kid who pushes himself hard, and in a few weeks he’ll be starting his Junior year of high school – a very important year academically.

His little brother, our younger son, is also an honor student, but personality-wise he’s the opposite. He’s a happy-go-lucky laid back sort of fellow. Things just seem to fall into place for him so he doesn’t tend to plan too far ahead – He enjoys the moment and doesn’t worry. If he had a theme song, it would be Bob Marley’s Three Little Birds, because in his mind, “every little thing is gonna be alright.”

So at dinner the other night, when our older son was talking about all his plans to conquer the world, his younger brother responded, “Well, I guess it’s good to have dreams. Maybe they’ll come true.” Our older son put his fork down and stared his little brother down. “I don’t have DREAMS,” he said, “I have GOALS.”

“Wow, that’s a good quote,” I said.

Carlos had zoned out. He was enjoying his panes con pollo.
“What’s a good quote?” he asked.

“No tengo sueños, tengo metas,” I answered in Spanish, so he could feel the depth of the quote.

“Wow. That is a good quote,” he said.

Carlos and I have done everything we can to support our boys in whatever they want to accomplish. A few weeks ago that meant lugging home a new desk for our older son even though we just bought him one last year. The problem with the old desk was one of size – it was just too small to accommodate the way he works. The new desk helped him spread out, but as you can see in the photo at the top of the post, he still needed a little help clearing space. Despite appearances he can be really organized, but when he’s in the middle of working on homework or projects it doesn’t look that way.

When Lowe’s said the August theme would be “Back-to-School” organization, I knew I’d be helping our older son organize his “office” area, as he calls it, but I wasn’t sure how. It took hours of walking around Lowe’s before I stumbled upon a creative idea and an easy solution all in one.

caddy-1

This is a shower caddy, designed to hang over the shower head and hold shampoo bottles, soap, razors, washcloths, and things of that nature – but what if I hung it on the wall instead?

caddy-organization-1

I easily moved the majority of the clutter off the desk and into the caddy. I just put a screw in the wall and hung it on there and it’s super sturdy. On the top shelf, I placed a few binders and folders. On the middle shelf there was plenty of room for cans of pencils and other office supplies. More little office supplies fit nicely on the bottom shelf, but my favorite use for the shower caddy for office organization is this:

type-up-notes

The bottom rung which is designed for hanging washcloths, is perfect to clip up notes which need to be typed up with the simple addition of two binder clips! This worked out so well I may have to go buy two more to install at my own desk and my younger son’s desk.

I think my boys are ready for back-to-school!

Want more creative ideas?

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