Author Archives: Tracy López

America’s Secret Slang

Image source: screen capture of TV program "America's Secret Slang" on H2

Image source: screen capture of TV program “America’s Secret Slang” on H2

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

“Cuándo hablas inglés estadounidense, en realidad estás hablando todo tipo de lenguas extranjeras que vinieron de todo tipo de inmigrantes.” - Zach Selwyn, presentador del programa, “America’s Secret Slang”

¿Has visto el programa de televisión “America’s Secret Slang” en H2 – History Channel? Amantes de idiomas – es uno que debes ver!

Este episodio llamado “Coming to America” es mi favorito.

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

“When you’re speaking American [English], you’re actually speaking all sorts of foreign languages that came from all sorts of immigrants.” – Zach Selwyn, host of TV program, America’s Secret Slang

Have you seen the show “America’s Secret Slang” on H2 – History Channel? Language lovers – it’s a must watch!

This episode called “Coming to America” is my favorite.

Raising Bilingual Teens & The 5 Stages of Grief

funny bilingual parenting comic by Latinaish.com

“Tenemos que hablar más …porque… tengo que pensar… por… cada… palabra,” my 15 year old son told me recently in halting Spanish as we walked around the international market. His Spanish is good but far from fluent.

Our 12 year old speaks even less than our 15 year old although he understands everything I say to him and voluntarily plays Club Penguin in Spanish, “just because.” He also switches to Spanish to get my attention. On a daily basis you can hear something like this in our house:

“Mommy, can I have a cookie?… Mommy… Hey, Mommy… Mamá, quiero una galleta.” — to which I finally answer him. Some parents do this on purpose so their children don’t speak English at home, but in my case, sometimes I’m just so focused on what I’m doing that I tune everyone out. Only the jolt of unexpected Spanish is what breaks my concentration.

Despite the fact that Spanish and Spanglish are still spoken on a daily basis in our household, we’ve begun to speak it less and less. I’ve said before that raising bilingual children “takes constant commitment and re-commitment” but it feels like we’ve been hitting pretty hard on the frequency and necessity of re-committing this past year.

You see, in my experience bilingual parenting, unlike most things you practice, does not get easier. In fact, I would argue that bilingual parenting only gets more and more difficult the older your children get.

Think about it – when your children are very young, one of the first questions they learn and repeat ad nauseam is, “What’s that?” … For parents raising bilingual children, even if the target language isn’t your native language, things start out pretty easy.

“What’s that?”
- Una manzana.
“What’s that?”
- El color verde.
“What’s that?”
- La luna.
“What’s that?”
- Un gato.

What a sense of accomplishment! You’re doing it! You’re really doing it! You’re raising a bilingual child!

Of course, the reality is that the older your child gets, the more complex his questions. Apple, green, moon, and cat are part of your vocabulary and now your child’s – no problem, but how do you answer:

“Where do babies come from?”
“What’s the difference between a Republican and a Democrat?”
“Why don’t birds get electrocuted when they sit on power lines?”
“How come it looks like the moon follows me when we drive in the car?”
“What’s endosymbiosis?”
“What exactly is a black hole?”
“What does ‘birth control’ mean?”
“Can you explain antidisestablishmentarianism?”
“If ‘X’ equals 32.4 and a train is traveling at 68 miles per hour…”

Nevermind answering those questions in Spanish – I may need Google’s help, (and a few aspirin) just to answer them in my native language! Apple, green, moon and cat will no longer be sufficient.

As a parent attempting to raise bilingual children, making mistakes along the way, and having setbacks, you often tell yourself, “It’s okay, there’s still time” – and yet, that time does run out, which is what you face as a parent of teenagers.

So, this is where we stand at the moment. We keep trying and will fight to the end to raise bilingual children, but I am at a point where I’m forced to accept that unless I drop them off in El Salvador for the next couple years, they most likely will not be native speaker fluent.

If your children are tweens or teens, you may be beginning to go through “the five stages of grief” if their Spanish isn’t as perfect as you had hoped. For me, it went something like this:

1. Denial – My kids are totally bilingual! They’re doing great!
2. Anger – Why aren’t they replying in Spanish! Whose fault is this?!
3. Bargaining – If they can just speak Spanish really well, not even perfectly, I’ll be happy.
4. Depression – This is my fault. I’m a failure as a parent.
5. Acceptance – I’ve done my best and will continue to try my hardest. All the effort has been worth it, and I’m okay with the result even if it falls short of perfection.

Just know that wherever you’re at on this bilingual parenting journey, you’re not alone, and like any other aspect of parenting, you’re not always going to get things exactly right.

Most importantly of all, don’t give up.

“There is no failure except in no longer trying.”
- Elbert Hubbard

Tacos, Tango & Fútbol (Windows Apps!)

I’m part of the Windows Champions Program. As a Windows Champion, I have been loaned a Surface Pro 2, a Venue 8 Pro, and, on occasion, Microsoft products such as software to assist me in developing content for my blog posts. All opinions are my own.

Some of you may know that last year I was a blog ambassador/”Windows Champion” for Microsoft Windows 8. My monthly posts shared tips and apps on SpanglishBaby and LatinaBloggersConnect because I was a blog ambassador on behalf of those websites, but this year in addition to the occasional post over on LatinaBloggersConnect, I’ll be a Windows 8.1 ambassador on behalf of my own blog, Latinaish!

My question for you guys is, what would you like to get out of these posts?

Let me know what you’d like to hear about in comments below. Also, if you ever have any Windows 8.1 questions, feel free to comment here or tweet me. Consider me your new Windows 8.1 amiga. If I don’t know the answer to your question, I’ll be happy to find out for you.

Now, for this first post, here are three apps que me encantan (because the apps are my favorite thing!)

¡Windows Apps Que Me Encantan!

tacomaster Taco Master – App description: “So you think you got what it takes to be a Taco Master? Take orders and throw together some fresh, tasty tacos as quick as you can in this fast-paced, streamlined time management game. Use a variety of ingredients from delicious spiced sausage to tongue melting chilies! Feel the heat as the orders fly in and you have to put together some crazy combinations.”I don’t usually get obsessed with passing new levels in games, but Taco Master is an exception! Highly addictive – you have been warned.

gambetas Gambetas – App description: “In this ability game you can control Jorge “El Jerbo” Quintana, a soccer player who aspires to be the best soccer dribbler in Latin American history. Jorge wishes to score some goals but his mayor satisfaction is to trick his opponents on the field, whereby you should help Jorge jump, evade or dribble his opponents on the field.”This is a great one for the niños!

tangotube Tango Tube – App description: “Ever wanted to dance Tango but never knew how? Ever tried to learn Tango but never found someone to teach you? Now, you can learn how to Tango with [this] series of video lessons brought to you in one place. Learn, dance and spread the love of Tango!”The narrator kind of reminds me of the narrator of film strips we watched in 5th grade health class on reproduction (in a good way, somehow) and the two dancers, Osvaldo and Maura, are quite seductive. I’m a little embarrassed by how long I watched these videos without any intention of actually learning the dance.

Noticias en Caliche

mas-sv

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Recientemente Carlos me introdujo a un sitio salvadoreño de noticias que se llama MAS.SV. La ventaja de leer MAS.SV no es sólo saber de eventos actuales en El Salvador y en todo el mundo – también es aprender vocabulario salvadoreño porque el sitio está escrito en “caliche” (el dialecto de El Salvador.) Son bien divertidos los titulares:

• Roban cel y luego se toman fotos cuando estaban haciendo picardías
• Conocé a Chantel Jeffries, la chica que iba con Justin Bieber cuando lo enchucharon
• Abunda la cochinada

También hay artículos chistosos y interesantes como, Pueblos españoles con nombres graciosos y Didga, el gato skater que causa furor en la web. Chécalo y diviértete!

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Carlos recently introduced me to a Salvadoran news website called MAS.SV. The advantage of reading it is not just knowing current events in El Salvador and around the world, but learning Salvadoran vocabulary because the site is written in “caliche” (Salvadoran slang.) The headlines are really funny:

[I'll try my best to translate the Salvadoran slang words.]

• Roban cel y luego se toman fotos cuando estaban haciendo picardías
(They stole a cellphone then took photos when they were “messing around” (sexual connotation.)

• Conocé a Chantel Jeffries, la chica que iba con Justin Bieber cuando lo enchucharon
(Meet Chantel Jeffries, the girl who was with Justin Bieber when they “got him/arrested him/put him in handcuffs.”)

• Abunda la cochinada
(“Dirtiness” abounds)

There are also humorous and interesting articles like Spanish towns with funny names and Didga, the skater cat causing excitement on the web. Check it out and enjoy!

Edmundo Otoniel Mejía

© Edmundo Otoniel Mejía

© Edmundo Otoniel Mejía

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation in italics!

La primera vez que encontré el arte de Edmundo Otoniel Mejía fue en una toalla – ¡en serio! Mi suegra me trajo una toalla de El Salvador y en la toalla había una escena bien bonita de gente clasificando granos de café. Me gustó tanto la escena en la toalla que busqué información sobre el artista por internet y descubrí que el artista es un salvadoreño que se llama Edmundo Otoniel Mejía.

A veces me gustan uno o dos cuadros de un artista, pero no me interesan por los demás – Eso no fue el caso con el arte del Señor Otoniel Mejía – ¡al contrario! Me gustaron tanto cada uno de los cuadros porque representan perfectamente la vida diaria de El Salvador, (hasta que hay perros callejeros en cada caudro – ¡un detalle que me encanta!) Quería comprar un cuadro, pero desafortunadamente los originales están fuera de mi presupuesto. Ojalá un día cuándo regresemos a visitar El Salvador vaya a encontrar impresiones accesibles de sus cuadros, o por lo menos, más toallas.

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

The first time I encountered the art of Edmundo Otoniel Mejía was on a towel – seriously! My mother-in-law brought me a towel from El Salvador and on the towel was depicted a really pretty scene of people sorting coffee beans. I liked the image on the towel so much that I turned to the internet for information about the artist and discovered that the artist is a Salvadoran named Edmundo Othniel Mejia.

Sometimes I only like one or two of an artist’s paintings, but don’t really care for the others. However, that was not the case with the art of Mr. Otoniel Mejía – on the contrary! I loved each painting so much because they each perfectly represent daily life in El Salvador (to the point that there are street dogs in each painting – a detail which I love!) I wanted to buy a painting, but unfortunately the originals are beyond my budget. Hopefully one day when we return to visit El Salvador I’ll be able to find affordable prints of his paintings, or at least, more towels.

Burrito Box – The World’s First Automated Burrito Kiosk

burritobox

I’ve never really wanted to live in Los Angeles… until now. Los Angeles is home to the Burrito Box, which is the first automated burrito kiosk. For $3 plus tax you can use the touchscreen vending machine to get one of the following 5 varieties at a Mobil gas station on Santa Monica Boulevard:

Chorizo sausage with cage-free eggs and cheese
Uncured bacon with egg and cheese
Roasted potato with egg and cheese
Free-range chicken with beans and rice
Shredded beef and cheese

If you want sour cream, hot sauce or guacamole, they cost a little bit extra. Pay with your credit card and then wait. (It takes about a minute to a minute and 30 seconds.)

Unfortunately, reviews from people who have actually tried the burritos seem to be much less enthusiastic than those who want to try the burritos. Since I’m on the east coast and don’t have access to a burrito vending machine I guess I will have to continue to make my own, but if anyone invents a pupusa vending machine, DC Metro area has dibs on it.

16 años

Tracy, Carlos y nuestro hijo mayor - 1999, La Playa Libertad, El Salvador

Tracy, Carlos y nuestro hijo mayor – 1999, La Playa Libertad, El Salvador

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation in italics!

Este fin de semana, Carlos y yo celebramos nuestro decimosexto aniversario. A veces no sé como hemos llegado a este punto juntos con todas las complicaciones de nuestro matrimonio, pero estoy super agradecida.

This weekend, Carlos and I celebrate our sixteenth anniversary. Sometimes I don’t know how we’ve reached this point together with all the complications of our marriage, but I’m super grateful.

Carlos y Tracy - San Salvador, El Salvador 2011

Carlos y Tracy – 2011, San Salvador, El Salvador

Pon el huevo en el agua

huevo-agua

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Tenemos varias tradiciones por comenzar el año nuevo pero este año Carlos me presentó a una nueva. Después de hablar por telefono con su hermana, Carlos me dijo que quería enseñarme algo que algunas personas hacen en El Salvador. Sacó un huevo del refrigerador, llenó un vaso con agua, y los dejó en la mesa para que pudieran llegar a temperatura ambiente.

“¿Pero qué es eso?” le pregunté.
“Es una manera en que uno puede predecir que viene en el año nuevo. Después de romper el huevo en el agua, la parte blanca del huevo hace formas.”

Le pregunté a Carlos, “¿Cómo se llama esta tradición?”
“Espera”, me dijo y mandó un mensaje de texto a su hermana para preguntar.
Un minuto más tarde, su teléfono sonó.
“¿Qué dijo?” le pregunté. “¿Cómo se llama la tradición?”
“Simplemente se llama ‘Pon el huevo en el agua’”, respondió Carlos. (Lo cual me hizo reír por unos minutos).

Cuando estaban a temperatura ambiente, Carlos rompió el huevo en el agua.

cracking-huevo

Y esperamos.

Y esperamos.

egg-in-water

Hasta que por fin…

volcano-egg

Pienso que parece al volcán de San Salvador. Ojalá significa que vamos a visitarlo este año.

Image source: Wikipedia author, Xtremesv

Image source: Wikipedia author, Xtremesv

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

We have several traditions to start the new year but this year Carlos introduced me to a new one. After talking on the phone with his sister, Carlos told me he wanted to show me something that some people do in El Salvador. He took an egg from the fridge, filled a glass with water, and then left them on the table to come to room temperature.

“But what is that?” I asked.
“It’s a way to predict what will come in the new year. After breaking the egg into the water, the white of the egg makes shapes.”

“What is the tradition called?” I asked.
“Hold on,” he said and sent a text message to his sister to ask.
A minute later, his phone rang.
“What did she say?” I asked. “What’s the tradition called?”
“It’s just called ‘Put the egg in the water,’” Carlos said, (Which made ​​me laugh for a few minutes.)

When they were at room temperature, Carlos broke the egg into the water.

Then we waited.

And waited.

Until finally…

I think it looks like the San Salvador volcano. Hopefully this means we’ll visit this year.

Días Importantes for Latinos in 2014

important holidays latin america

Feliz Año Nuevo! If you’re anything like Carlos, then you already have your 2014 calendar on display – If you’re anything like me, then you’re still waiting for Amazon to deliver your 2014 agenda which you ordered at the last minute. Either way, here are some dates to make note of which may not already be marked in your calendar or agenda. You don’t want to miss National Taco Day, now do you?

Latin American and Latino-American Holidays 2014

January

New Year’s Day/ Año Nuevo – 1st
Desfile de las Rosas – 1st
Independence Day, Cuba – 1st
Día de los Reyes – 6th

February

Día de la Candelaria – 2nd
Día de San Valentín/ Día del Amor y la Amistad, USA – 14th
National Margarita Day, USA – 22nd
Independence Day, Dominican Republic – 27th

March

Ash Wednesday/ El Miércoles de Ceniza – 5th

April

April Fools’ Day, USA – 1st
National Empanada Day, USA – 8th
Domingo de Ramos – 13th
Jueves Santo – 17th
Viernes Santo – 18th
Domingo de Resurrección – 20th
Día de los Niños, US and Mexico – 30th

May

Cinco de Mayo, USA and part of Mexico – 5th
Mother’s Day – 11th for US and most of Latin America, 10th for El Salvador, Guatemala and Mexico
Independence Day, Paraguay – 15th

June

The beginning of FIFA World Cup 2014 in Brazil – 13th
Father’s Day – 15th for US and most of Latin America, 17th for El Salvador and Guatemala
El Día E (Spanish language appreciation day) – 22nd

July

Independence Day, USA and Puerto Rico – 4th
Independence Day, Venezuela – 5th
Independence Day, Argentina – 9th
Independence Day, Colombia – 20th
Día del Amigo, Argentina – 20th
Día Internacional del Perro Callejero – 27th
Independence Day, Peru -28th

August

Fiestas Agostinas, El Salvador – 5th to 11th
Salvadoran American Day, USA – 6th
Independence Day, Bolivia – 6th
Independence Day, Ecuador – 10th
Independence Day, Uruguay – 25th

September

Independence Day, Brazil – 7th
Independence Day, El Salvador, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Honduras, Nicaragua – 15th
Hispanic Heritage Month – 15th (to October 15th)
Independence Day, Mexico – 15th & 16th
Independence Day, Chile – 18th

October

National Taco Day, USA – 4th
Halloween, USA – 31st

November

Día de Todos los Santos – 1st
Día de los Muertos/Difuntos – 2nd
Independence Day, Panama – 3rd
National Pupusa Day, El Salvador – 9th
Universal Children’s Day – 20th (Countries throughout Latin America celebrate it different days)
Thanksgiving, USA – 27th

December

Giving Tuesday (donate to charity) – 2nd
Día de la Virgen de Guadalupe – 12th
Las Posadas (to Nochebuenda) – 16th
Nochebuena – 24th
Navidad – 25th
Día de los Inocentes, Latin America – 28th

Did I miss an awesome holiday celebrated in Latin America or by Latinos in other parts of the world? Leave a comment so we can celebrate, too!

Organízate!

get-organized

As a member of Lowe’s Creative Ideas Network I received gift cards from Lowe’s in order to purchase supplies to complete projects. All opinions are my own.

Carlos wouldn’t describe me as an organized person but it seems to me I’m always organizing something, and this past month I tackled an area of our casita we were both unhappy with – the laundry room.

laundry-room-before

First let me explain, our house is small – So small in fact that we don’t have a basement, garage, attic or extra bedroom, (also known as the places most people stash all kinds of random, little-used and seasonal things.) Because of this lack of storage space, the laundry room has become our “catch all” area – specifically, the shelf hidden behind the blue curtain.

The level of disorganization behind that curtain was so horrible that I was too ashamed to even take a photo of it. Something had to be done.

We took down the curtain (which is on an adjustable rod), and then sorted everything into categories. Some of the things we kept, some we donated and some went into the trash.

Next we removed the wire shelving so we could give the scratched up wall a much needed coat of paint after first repairing emergency “access doors” that had been haphazardly cut into the drywall to fix leaks years ago.

Taping off the trim with painter’s tape made the job easier. I let my younger son choose the paint color and he chose “Green Supreme” by Valspar.

Once the paint had dried, we had a decision to make. We could install cabinets which is more difficult and much more expensive, or we could put the wire shelving back and organize our things into baskets. I chose the basket route which I think was the right choice since a lot of important pipes are inside that wall and putting up cabinets would make it difficult to access them in an emergency.

I also decided not to get rid of the curtain entirely as I had originally planned – reinstalling it under the shelf meant I could hide the unsightly washer hoses, (and this also helps prevent the loss of runaway calcetines that somehow get flung back there.)

laundry-room-after

We’re much happier with the way it looks and being organized is a great way to start the new year.

¡Feliz Año Nuevo!

Want more creative ideas?

Winter Badge '13 280x200

 

Check out more from Lowe’s Creative Ideas Network by subscribing to their Creative Ideas Magazine and E-Newsletter, following them on Pinterest, and by seeing what the other Lowe’s Creative Ideas Network members are up to.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 557 other followers