10 Gifs For Parents Raising Bilingual Kids

Parenting is one of the biggest challenges there is, and bilingual parenting can be twice as hard. Here are 10 animated gifs only parents raising bilingual kids will understand. Laugh, cry, be entertained – I know you feel me.

#1. When your bilingual child is just a baby everything is new and awesome. Mixing the languages together is totally normal and totally adorable. So your reaction when your baby speaks Spanglish is something like:

so-cute

#2. Fast forward 10 years though and your child is still not fluent. Your child’s Spanglish at this stage of the game may have become somewhat less enchanting.

weep-die

#3. But then one day your child says their first curse word in Spanish, (and you know they learned it from you.)

amazing

Hey, at least they’re speaking Spanish.

#4. And then comes that magical age when they get to pick a foreign language at school. The child you’re raising English/Spanish bilingual tells you they want to take… French.

wait-what

#5. Okay, okay. We must embrace all language learning. It’s fine, they can learn French. Maybe they’ll be trilingual you say to yourself. But then they ask for help with their French homework and you discover your mouth will only pronounce French words following Spanish-language rules so you’re completely unhelpful.

blooblah

#6. At some point you realize hey, we’re not speaking enough Spanish at home, so you try the famous “I won’t acknowledge you unless you speak Spanish” tactic.

wont-hear-it

#7. However your child’s reaction to the “I won’t acknowledge you unless you speak Spanish” tactic is:

ok

#8. Time to get stealthy. You decide you’ll try to sneak Spanish into your child’s life by listening to Spanish-language music in the car.

botas-picudas

#9. However, this is your child’s reaction when you listen to Spanish-language music in the car right before they put their earbuds in.

dont-want-to-hear

#10. You’ve all but given up until one day your teenager develops a crush on a native Spanish speaker at school and suddenly takes a renewed interest in learning the language.

Frank-Underwood-Saying-Welcom-Back-House-of-Cards-S2-E1

13 Gifs Only Latinos Married to Gringas Will Understand

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation is in italics!

Aunque estos gifs estan basados en la experiencia personal de Carlos, si eres un Latino/a casado con una gringa/o, tal vez identificas con algunos de ellos. (Y si eres una gringa/o casado con Latino/a, chequea este post: 20 Gifs Only Gringas Married to Latinos Can Understand.)

Although these are based on Carlos’s personal experience, if you’re a Latino/a married to a gringa/o, you may identify with some of these. (And if you’re a gringa/o married with a Latino/a, check out this post: 20 Gifs Only Gringas Married to Latinos Can Understand.)

#1. borednow

Cuando vas a una “fiesta” de tus suegros gringos y no hay música o baile.

When you go to your gringo in-laws “parties” and there’s no music or dancing.

#2. nothing-can-do

Cuando estás tratando de ver las noticias en español y tu esposa quiere saber por qué hay mujeres semidesnudas en la pantalla.

When you’re just trying to watch the Spanish-language news and your wife wants to know why there’s half-naked women on the screen.

#3. shock

Cuando tu esposa usa palabras en español que aprendió de la música de Pitbull en compañía educada o delante de tu abuela.

When your spouse uses Spanish words she learned from Pitbull’s music in polite company or in front of your abuela.

#4. does-not-get-it

La reacción de tu esposa cuando explicas algo cultural que ella simplemente parece que no puede aceptar, como la necesidad de dar rosas a tu madre en el Día de San Valentín.

Your spouse’s reaction when you explain something cultural to her that she just can’t seem to accept, like the necessity of giving your mother roses on Valentine’s Day.

#5. fight-for-me

Las consecuencias de no defender a tu esposa cuando tu madre criticó a ella.

The aftermath of not defending your spouse when your mother criticized him/her.

#6. naah

La reacción de tu madre cuando le dices que te vas a casar con la gringa.

Your mother’s reaction when you tell her you’re marrying the gringa.

#7. no-michael-scott

Cuando preguntas qué hay de comer y ella dice peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.

When you ask what’s for lunch and she says peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.

#8. Huh_wtf_uhm

Tu reacción cuando tu esposa o suegros gringos permiten que el perro lame la cara.

Your reaction when your spouse or gringo in-laws let their pet dog lick them all over the face.

#9. sad-cold

En Nochebuena, cuando hace frío, tranquilo y solitario y comienzas a sentirte nostálgico por tu país de origen.

On Nochebuena when it’s cold, quiet and lonely and you start feeling nostalgic for home.

#10. who-am-i

Cuando por fin regresas a visitar tu país natal y todos tus familiares te dicen que hablas divertido porque has perdido el acento local y no conoces las últimas palabras coloquiales.

When you finally go back to visit your native country and all your relatives tell you that you speak funny because you’ve lost the local accent and aren’t up on the latest slang.

#11. cool

Cuando la gente se entera de dónde eres y empieza a nombrar todas sus comidas favoritas de tu país.

When people find out where you’re from and start naming all their favorite foods from your country.

#12. calm-down-children

Cuando tu esposa no cree en disciplina corporal y no puedes utilizar la chancla.

When your spouse doesn’t believe in physical discipline so you can’t use the chancla.

#13. imfine

Cuando tienes una discusión con tu esposa y te acusa de gritar.

When you’re having a discussion with your spouse and they accuse you of yelling.

20 Gifs Only Gringas Married to Latinos Can Understand

Well, okay, the title of this post is a little bit specific to my personal experience, but truthfully, a lot of bilingual and/or bicultural people will relate. Which ones ring true for you?

#1. awkward-get-together

When you have a family get-together and you’re sitting between your monolingual English-speaking family and monolingual Spanish-speaking in-laws.

#2. bad-accent-reaction

When you overhear other gringos mispronounce Spanish words, such as “jalapeño” so it sounds like “hala-pee-no.”

#3. do-you-speak-spanish-telemarketer

When telemarketers call your house and ask, “¿Habla español usted, señora?”

#4. yeah-i-understand

When a native Spanish speaker seriously overestimates your fluency and starts talking crazy fast in a dialect or accent you aren’t used to but you have too much pride to ask them to slow down.

#5. husband-likes-your-cooking-better

When your spouse says you cook his/her native food better than your suegra.

#6. i-have-a-right

When you and your spouse get into an argument brought on by cultural differences and you suddenly feel very patriotic.

#7. im-bilingual-girl

When another chick tries to flirt with your spouse right in front of you.

#8. jacksparrow-spying

When you’re in an aisle at the grocery store and people start having what they think is a private conversation out loud in Spanish, not realizing you understand every word.

#9. pigs-feet

When you’re eating at an in-law’s house and they tell you what parts of the animal the food is made from.

#10. should-i-intervene

When you see a native Spanish-speaker struggling to communicate with an impatient cashier in English and you aren’t sure if you should intervene/help them out because you don’t want to offend them.

#11. spanish-genius

When your spouse forgets a word in their native Spanish, and you remember it before they do.

#12. when-suegra-says

When your suegra says something to you in Spanish that has a double meaning and after a few seconds, you realize it was a backhanded compliment meant to insult you.

#13. witch-eyes

When you visit your spouse’s native country and people compliment your eye color.

#14. waitwhat

The way people look at you in a doctor’s waiting room when they call out your Spanish last name and you stand up.

#15. muy-excited

When you forget a Spanish word mid-sentence and you’re like, screw it.

#16. not-sure-gif

When you fill out paperwork and come to the “Are you Hispanic or Latino/a?” question.

#17. do-i

When someone says, “¡Guau! Hablas muy bien el español.”

#18. glam

When you get ready to go to a party or event hosted by Latino friends or family… (or go out for tacos.)

#19. personal-space

When, even after all these years, you still have very strong gringo/a preferences for personal space.

#20. shrug-seinfeld

When newly married bicultural couples ask you and your spouse how you’ve managed to stay together so long and are hoping for some really wise words to guide their marriage.

Silbar La Vieja

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Mirando “Domingo Para Todos” Carlos empezó a reír cuando gente en la audiencia estaban silbando. El silbido fue muy distino y de tres latidos – dos cortos y uno un poco más largo. Como “¡Fi-Fi Ffuuu!”

“¿Qué significa este silbido?” pregunté yo.

Carlos me explicó que este silbido se llama “la vieja” y en El Salvador es igual a decir “tu madre.” (O sea, es un insulto.) El silbido es muy utilizado en los estadios por insultar al árbitro cuando él hace una mala decisión, o si tienes la necesidad de insultar a alguien que está lejos. Si uno está manejando un carro y quiere utilizar el silbido con otro conductor, también se puede hacer “la vieja” con la bocina.

Carlos aceptó gentilmente a dar una demostración.

Parece una habilidad útil. Tal vez debería empezar a usar el silbido con gente que me enojan si no son salvadoreños. Silbar “la vieja” me ofrece la oportunidad de expresar lo que estoy pensando y la otra persona sólo pensará que estoy loca. Ningún daño hecho!

(Image source: Steven Depolo)

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

While watching “Domingo Para Todos” Carlos started to laugh when people in the audience were whistling. The whistle was very distinctive and had three beats – two short beats, followed by one a little bit longer. Like, “Sss-Sss Srrr!”

“What does that whistle mean?” I asked.

Carlos explained to me that the whistle is called “la vieja” [the old lady] and in El Salvador it’s the same as saying “tu madre” [your mother/yo mama]… In other words, it’s an insult. The whistle is very useful in soccer stadiums to insult the referee when he makes a bad call, or if you need to insult someone from a distance. If you’re driving in a car and want to make use of the whistle when angry with another driver, you can even imitate the sound with your car horn.

Carlos graciously agreed to give a demonstration.

Seems like a useful skill. Maybe I should start using the whistle with non-Salvadorans who make me angry. Whistling “la vieja” offers me the opportunity to express what I’m thinking and the other person will only think that I’m crazy. No harm done!

(Image source: Steven Depolo)

SUN BELT EXPRESS – immigration, humor and corazón

Screen Shot 2014-09-17 at 4.31.07 PM

When I was contacted two years ago by producer Evan Buxbaum about his script for SUN BELT EXPRESS, I was hesitant. He wanted to make a film about undocumented immigrants that “could find some of the humor and light, in what is typically a very dark subject.” I asked myself, is that possible? Can one mix humor and such a serious topic?

In the end I agreed to be a beta-reader because Evan seemed very sincere and I thought it was wise of him to verify authenticity in the dialogue and seek opinions of those close to the topic at hand.

I read his script in its entirety and ended up loving it. Evan thanked me for the feedback and I hadn’t really thought much about his project since then, but this week Evan contacted me again – the film has been completed and will be premiering in the U.S. this October. (Check www.sunbeltexpressmovie.com for locations and dates.)

Today I had the opportunity to watch the full-length finished film and found it very much worth sharing with all of you. My review is below, but in short, I encourage you all to support the film and go see it if you’re able to. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

(Full disclosure: As stated, I was a beta-reader for the SUN BELT EXPRESS script and as such you can see my name in the film credits under general “thanks”, however this review reflects only my honest opinion.)

Review – SUN BELT EXPRESS

Allen King (Tate Donovan) is a divorced Ethics professor in southern Arizona who, accused of plagiarism and fired, is forced to commute daily to his new teaching job across the border in Mexico. The money he makes isn’t enough to keep up with his own bills or car maintenance, let alone meet the financial demands of his ex-wife (Rachel Harris) or pay his teenage daughter’s private school tuition. To supplement his income, Allen gets wrapped up in smuggling Mexican immigrants across the border in the trunk of his beat up 1972 Volvo.

Things get complicated when his teenage daughter (India Ennenga) mistakenly thinks her father is doing something altruistic and unexpectedly tags along for the ride. Add in a pregnant ex-girlfriend (Ana de la Reguera), three Mexican men in the trunk, two corrupt U.S. Border Patrol agents, and an overheated car that breaks down at the worst possible moment, and you have a situation that would seem to be no laughing matter – but that’s where you’d be wrong.

Mexicans have a dicho – “Al mal tiempo, buena cara” – which means put on a good face during bad times. Be positive; it’s an attitude shared by many Latin Americans. And while most films on immigration show the heartbreaking reality, the difficult choices made, the perilous journey – SUN BELT EXPRESS is a rare exploration into the humor of this mostly solemn situation.

Talk long enough to a person who immigrated illegally to the United States – more often than not, they will have a funny story or two to tell about their journey. My own husband has told me stories about a guy who accompanied him and carried a bottle of Pepto-Bismol like a hip flask which he regularly took sips from “to help with his nerves.” During another part of his journey, he wasn’t able to turn off a broken sink in a motel bathroom and chaos ensued.

For me, the brilliance of the film SUN BELT EXPRESS is found in moments like this. The dialogue between “passengers” Rafi and Miguel in the trunk is the main highlight. Rafi (Oscar Avila), who is somewhat fat, makes a stressful situation even more stressful for Miguel (Arturo Castro), who happens to be claustrophobic. If lack of space wasn’t enough of a problem, Rafi is quite generous with stories about all the adventures he’s had trying to cross the border before, although he’s only been caught “cinco, seis veces…o lo mucho siete.” The chemistry between these two actors is fantastic, and the friendship that blooms between them on screen made me smile as much as the well-acted humorous lines which are never crass but full of corazón.

SUN BELT EXPRESS contains plenty of entertainment in the form of humor, but it’s well-balanced by a bigger message. Serious themes including morality and political corruption are an essential part of the plot but the film never comes across as preachy. In the end, the deeply flawed protagonist redeems himself and the film succeeds at traversing the difficult border between heartfelt humor and hurtful ridicule when dealing with extremely sensitive subject matter. SUN BELT EXPRESS is a daring, fresh take on the immigration journey which is just as likely to spark important conversation as it is laughter.

Real Amas de Casa de Soyapango (y otros programas que quiero ver)

Image adapted from photo by Christian Dory/Wikipedia

Image adapted from photo by Christian Dory/Wikipedia

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Cuando compartí en Facebook la noticia de que va a salir un programa que se llama “Acapulco Shore” (basado en el famoso programa “Jersey Shore”), un amigo mío que se llama Jaime me dijo, sería mejor si hicieran un programa “Real Amas de Casa de Soyapango” (basado en el programa “Real Housewives of Orange County.”)

No soy fan de muchos programas de televisión, pero si tuvieran un “toque” salvadoreño, yo estaría mucho más interesada en verlos, entonces, se me occurió la idea de hacer esta lista.

Programas Populares (si los hubieran realizado en El Salvador)

En vez de Real Housewives of Orange County – Real Amas de Casa de Soyapango
En vez de Jersey Shore – La Libertad Shore
En vez de Law & Order: SVU – Ley & Orden: PNC
En vez de Iron Chef – La Mejor Pupusera
En vez de American Idol – Idol Salvadoreño (con jueces Álvaro Torres, Mr. Pelón 503 y Allison Iraheta)
En vez de America’s Got Talent – El Salvador Tiene Talento (con jueces Cocolito, La Tenchis, y Cipitío)
En vez de Keeping Up with the Kardashians – Mantenerse al Tanto con Los Pomas
En vez de Deadliest Catch – Los Pescadores Futbolistas
En vez de 19 Kids and Counting – 19 Primos y Contando
En vez de Pawn Stars – Mercado Central
En vez de Pit Bulls and Parolees – Chuchos Aguacateros y Mareros
En vez de Mad Money – Locas Remesas
En vez de America’s Secret Slang – Caliche
En vez de What Would You Do? – ¿Qué Harías Vos?
En vez de Ice Road Truckers – Microbúseros

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

When I shared on Facebook that a T.V. show called “Acapulco Shore” (based on the famous “Jersey Shore”) would be coming out, a friend of mine named Jaime commented that it would be better if they made a show called “Real Amas de Casa de Soyapango” (based on the show “Real Housewives of Orange County.”)

I’m not a fan of many T.V. shows but if they had a Salvadoran “twist”, I would be much more interested in watching them, so it occurred to me to make this list.

Popular T.V. programs (if they had been made in El Salvador)

Instead of Real Housewives of Orange County – Real Amas de Casa de Soyapango
Instead of Jersey Shore – La Libertad Shore
Instead of Law & Order: SVU – Ley & Orden: PNC
Instead of Iron Chef – La Mejor Pupusera
Instead of American Idol – Idol Salvadoreño (with judges Álvaro Torres, Mr. Pelón 503 y Allison Iraheta)
Instead of America’s Got Talent – El Salvador Tiene Talento (with judges Cocolito, La Tenchis, y Cipitío)
Instead of Keeping Up with the Kardashians – Mantenerse al Tanto con Los Pomas
Instead of Deadliest Catch – Los Pescadores Futbolistas
Instead of 19 Kids and Counting – 19 Primos y Contando
Instead of Pawn Stars – Mercado Central
Instead of Pit Bulls and Parolees – Chuchos Aguacateros y Mareros
Instead of Mad Money – Locas Remesas
Instead of America’s Secret Slang – Caliche
Instead of What Would You Do? – ¿Qué Harías Vos?
Instead of Ice Road Truckers – Microbúseros

Tienes un hijo salvadoreño si…

abuela-cookies-pupusas

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Hay muchas señales que uno está criando un hijo salvadoreño en los Estados Unidos, (aquí hay 15!) pero el fin de semana pasado, mi hijo menor me hizo reír mucho con un comentario que reveló cómo muy salvadoreño que es.

Mi hijo mayor trabaja en un museo para niños y él trajo a casa un papel con actividades para niños por su hermanito, (aunque su hermanito ya es demasiado mayor para este tipo de actividades.) En el papel hay fáciles crucigramas y cosas así. En una parte del papel hay un dibujo de una abuela con un plato de galletas, y el niño debe completar un laberinto para que la abuela puede traer las galletas a sus nietos, (o algo así.)

Sin leerlo, mi hijo menor me mostró el dibujo y me dijo, “Mira, qué gran plato de pupusas tiene la abuela.”

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

There are a lot of signs that you’re raising a Salvadoran child in the United States, (here are 15!) but this past weekend, my younger son made me laugh a lot with a comment he made which revealed how very Salvadoran he is.

My older son works at a children’s museum and he brought home an activity sheet for kids to give to his little brother, (even though his little brother is already too old for these types of activities.) On the activity sheet there are easy crossword puzzles and things like that. On one part of the paper, there’s a drawing of a grandmother holding a plate of cookies, and the child is supposed to complete a maze so the grandmother can bring the cookies to her grandchildren, (or something like that.)

Without reading it, my younger son showed me the drawing and said, “Look, what a big plate of pupusas the grandmother has.”