Salvadoran Nuégados

nuegados

Disclosure: Latinaish.com has partnered with Nestlé to bring you recipes using Nestlé products. As always, all opinions are my own.

Known as “buñuelos” in much of Latin America, El Salvador calls these traditional Easter fritters “nuégados” and they’re almost always accompanied by a toasted corn drink called “chilate.” There are many different varieties of nuégados with the most popular one being nuégados de yuca, but a Salvadoran acquaintance recently introduced me to nuégados de guieno (banana nuégados), which are much easier to make. The banana imparts a very delicate taste to the fried donuts which makes them delicious on their own, but they’re even more amazing with homemade Salvadoran “miel” (syrup) drizzled over top.

Here’s my recipe, and then down below, enter for your chance to win a $50 gift card from Nestlé!

For additional recipes, visit ElMejorNido.com.

nuegados con chilate

Salvadoran Banana Fritters / Nuégados Salvadoreños en Miel

Ingredients:
2 cups canola oil, for frying
1 cup flour
2 large ripe bananas, peeled
1/4 cup NESTLÉ® CARNATION® Evaporated Lowfat 2% Milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Directions:

COMBINE flour and bananas in a medium bowl. Use a fork or hands to mash the bananas well and mix them thoroughly into the flour.

ADD the evaporated milk, vanilla extract, and salt. Stir to combine.

DROP spoonfuls of the dough into a large pot of medium-hot oil. Use metal tongs to carefully and continuously splash oil on top of each fritter, and to turn each fritter when it becomes golden brown. Cook only a few at a time so you don’t overcrowd them.

REMOVE each fritter to drain on a paper towel-lined plate when golden brown on both sides.

SERVE warm and with syrup drizzled on top, if desired. (Makes about 1 dozen.)

nuegados salvadorenos

nuégados en miel con chilate

Salvadoran Syrup (“Miel”)

Ingredients:

14 ounces of panela or piloncillo*
3 cups water
10 whole cloves
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

*If you’re unable to find panela, or piloncillo, you can substitute 2 cups of dark brown sugar.

Directions:

COMBINE all ingredients in a medium pot over medium-high heat.

BRING to a boil, stirring occasionally. The panela will melt and break up on its own. No need to force it.

BOIL for a few minutes, stirring when necessary to keep it from boiling over.

LOWER heat and simmer for a few more minutes until the liquid thickens slightly. Dip a spoon in and watch the way it coats the spoon and drips off it. This will give you an idea of whether it has thickened a little.

REMOVE from heat and allow to cool slightly. The syrup will thicken a little bit more upon cooling.

SERVE drizzled over Salvadoran Banana Fritters. Keep any unused portion refrigerated in a jar with a tight-fitting lid.

Salvadoran fritters

Giveaway Details

Prize description: One lucky winner will receive a $50 gift card.

How to enter: Just leave a comment below telling me your favorite Easter food. (Please read official rules below before entering.)

Official Rules: No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years of age or older to enter. You must be able to provide a U.S. address for prize shipment. Your name and address will only be shared with the PR agency responsible for prize fulfillment for that purpose. Please no P.O. Boxes. One entry per household. Make sure that you enter a valid email address in the email address field so you can be contacted if you win. Winner will be selected at random. Winner has 24 hours to respond. If winner does not respond within 24 hours, a new winner will be selected at random. Giveaway entries are being accepted between March 30, 2015 through April 3rd, 2015. Entries received after April 3rd, 2015 at 11:59 pm EST, will not be considered. The number of eligible entries received determines the odds of winning. If you win, by accepting the prize, you are agreeing that Latinaish.com assumes no liability for damages of any kind. By entering your name below you are agreeing to these Official Rules. Void where prohibited by law.

Buena suerte / Good luck!

Torrejas Salvadoreñas en Miel

Torrejas

Torrejas are kind of like French Toast and in El Salvador as well as in other parts of Latin America, they’re eaten during Semana Santa (holy week, Lent, and Easter), with a special homemade syrup. One of the things that make Torrejas more amazing than your average homemade American French Toast is that after it’s fried to a golden brown, it’s cooked a second time in the syrup. The type of bread used is also important, as your common white sandwich bread will not do! Salvadorans use thick slices of a bread called “torta de yema” but it’s difficult to find in the United States. Good substitutes for torta de yema include Challah or “pan de leche” (milk bread.) Challah can be found at some grocery stores and the “pan de leche” I used for this recipe was from a Latina bakery.

Another ingredient I want to explain a little is the “dulce de panela.” Panela is an unrefined brown sugar and it looks like this:

dulce de panela
(Wrapped in plastic)

dulce de panela
(Wrapped in dried corn husks)

dulce de panela
(Salvadoran “panela”)

If you’re unable to find Salvadoran “panela” at your local Mercado Latino or International Market, then you can substitute about two 8 ounce Mexican piloncillos or about 2 cups of dark brown sugar.

Ready for the most amazing French Toast experience of your life? Then you’re ready to make Salvadoran Torrejas en Miel!

Torrejas Salvadoreñas en Miel

Torrejas Salvadoreñas en Miel

First, How to make the “miel” (syrup):

You need:

1/2 of a 28 oz. panela (So, about 14 ounces. For substitutions see post above.)
3 cups water
10 whole cloves
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1. Combine all ingredients in a medium pot over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. (The panela will melt and break up on its own. No need to force it.)

2. Boil for a few minutes, stirring when necessary to keep it from boiling over.

3. Lower heat and simmer for a few more minutes until the liquid thickens slightly. (Dip a spoon in and watch the way it coats the spoon and drips off it. This will give you an idea of whether it has thickened a little. Note that the liquid is a thinner consistency than American-style syrup or honey – that’s okay!)

4. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly. (The liquid will thicken a little bit more upon cooling.)

5. Now this is ready for the Torrejas! Set aside and continue below.

How to make the Torrejas:

You need:

2 tortas de yema (or 2 loaves of Challah, or milk bread/pan de leche)
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons white sugar
2 cups 1% milk
8 eggs

Canola oil for frying
a batch of “miel” (the recipe above)

1. Slice the bread into thick slices, (about 1 inch thick or a little more.)

2. In a large shallow dish, beat the eggs, milk, salt and sugar until well combined. (You can use an electric mixer for about 1 minute.)

3. Dip the bread slices into the egg/milk mixture one-by-one, allowing them a few seconds on each side to soak up the liquid. Fry in oil over medium-high heat in a large frying pan, being careful not to crowd the slices in the pan. (My pan only fit two pieces at a time.) Flip when golden brown and cook the other side the same.

4. When each slice is golden brown on both sides, remove to a large rectangular baking dish or Pyrex lined with paper towels to absorb some of the oil.

5. Preheat oven to 350 F.

6. When the entire batch has been fried, carefully remove the paper towels from beneath the torrejas.

7. Some people cook the torrejas in a frying pan with the miel, but I find baking them works great and is much easier. Pour 1 cup of the miel onto the torrejas in the Pyrex, making sure that all get some of the “miel” on them. (Avoid including any of the cloves.)

8. Bake at 350 F for 5 to 10 minutes.

9. Serve with additional miel to drizzle on top.

Note: You will probably have leftover miel. This can be put into a jar and refrigerated. Use it in other recipes such as Jocotes en Miel or Nuegados!

Torrejas Salvadoreñas

Corazones de Pañito para Día de San Valentín

doily-hearts

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

¿Necesitas una manualidad rapida y accesible para el Día de San Valentín? Estos corazones de papel en forma de pañito sólo cuestan $1 por paquete de 30 en la tienda Dollar Tree. Con un marcador de cualquier color que te guste, puedes escribir cortos mensajes en cada uno y después decorar el carro, oficina o puerta para tu amado.

Aquí hay unas frases que puedes escribir. (¡También sirve como lección de español si quieres hacer la manualidad con los niños!)

Te Quiero
Te Quiero Mucho
TQM
Te Amo
Te Adoro
Nene/Nena
Corazón
Corazón de Melon
Guapo/Guapa
Chulo/Chula
Bonito/Bonita
Amor
Amorcito Corazón
Cielito Lindo
Bésame
Besos
Abrazos
Se Mío
Papi Chulo/Mami Chula
Te Amo Un Chingo
Tú y Yo
Para Siempre

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Title: Doily Hearts for Valentine’s Day

Do you need a fast and affordable craft for Valentine’s Day? These paper doily hearts are only $1 for a pack of 30 at Dollar Tree. With a colored marker you can write short messages on each heart and then decorate the car, office, or door of your beloved.

Here are some phrases in Spanish you can write. (This also serves as a Spanish lesson if you do the craft with the kids!)

Te Quiero
Te Quiero Mucho
TQM
Te Amo
Te Adoro
Nene/Nena
Corazón
Corazón de Melon
Guapo/Guapa
Chulo/Chula
Bonito/Bonita
Amor
Amorcito Corazón
Cielito Lindo
Bésame
Besos
Abrazos
Se Mío
Papi Chulo/Mami Chula
Te Amo Un Chingo
Tú y Yo
Para Siempre

Feliz Navidad 2014

chico-feliz-nav2

Hola people! It’s Christmas week so I’m going to be spending a few days away from the computer eating tamales, taking naps, and making sure our dog Chico doesn’t open gifts under the tree that don’t belong to him. This week you’ll be able to find fresh content on my Facebook, Twitter and possibly Instagram, but as most of you know I write for other places on the internet besides my blog, so here are a few recent holiday pieces I’ve written if you’d like to check those out too.

Wishing you all a Nochebuena and Navidad full of felicidad, familia, and muchos blessings!

10 Facts About Navidad in Latin America

If you think Christmas is celebrated in relatively the same way all over the world, you’ll be surprised by the variation in traditions found in Latin America alone. Here are 10 unique ways the holiday is recognized from Mexico all the way down to Paraguay, and many countries in between. [Read the rest here!]

10 Songs for Your Nochebuena Playlist

We all know and love the classic bilingual Jose Feliciano song, “Feliz Navidad,” but it’s time to play DJ and mix it up a bit for your Nochebuena fiesta. Here are 10 danceable Spanish-language Christmas songs from all over Latin America and the U.S. to get the party started. [Read the rest here!]

Nochebuena vs. Christmas Eve: Same holiday? Kind of — and not at all.

If you’re bilingual and bicultural, you may be saying “Wait a minute, aren’t Christmas Eve and Nochebuena the same thing?” The answer is yes… and no. It’s the same holiday but chances are… [Read the rest here!]

A Holiday Sampler of Treasured Memories on Latin@s in Kid Lit

I was included in this holiday story round-up on Latin@s in Kid Lit. Read my story and others here.

Latinaish Gift Guide 2015

gift-guide-2015

The holidays are here and there’s still time to buy the perfect gift for amigos y familia. Here are a few of my suggestions! (Disclosure: I did not receive any compensation or samples of any of the gift ideas featured – I just love them and think you will too!)

chileanpig

Chilean Good Luck Pig from Hungersite.com, $6.95

spanish-word-a-day

365 Spanish Words a Year 2015 Desk Calendar from Calendars.com, $13.99

mexico-book

Mexico: The Cookbook from Amazon.com, $29.21

socks

Tapatío socks from TapatioHotSauce.com, $15

cuban-food-print

Cuban food poster from Marta Darby / My Big Fat Cuban Family, $38

hot-sauce-gift

Hot Sauce Lovers Gift Pack from MexGrocer.com, $15.95

directo-cafe

Coffee from El Salvador from Directo Caffe, $11-19

hammock

Hammock made in Mexico from NOVICA, $68.99
(If that one has sold out, NOVICA has many other beautiful hammocks.)

travel-bag

Antiqued Leather Travel Bag made in Mexico from NOVICA, $259.99

pandulce

Pan dulce coin purse from VivaMexico.com, $3.96

spanglishkids

Se Habla Spanglish shirt from DosBorreguitas.com, $20 (kid and adult sizes)

MusicAndes

Putumayo Music of the Andes from Putumayo, $14.98 (or any of the Latin American Putumayo CD’s really.)

chavo

Chavo Del 8: Coleccion Inedita from Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble, prices vary (around $20)

turtles

Guatemalan plush turtle toys from Mayanft.com, $5.35

frida-prints

4 Frida Kahlo prints from Etsy / KarenHaringArt, $12.95

chuao

Chuao (Venezuelan chocolatier) chocolate from Chuao (all the chocolate bar flavors are amazing), prices vary

How to make: a Pupusería for your Nacimiento

pupuseria-traisy-1

As a member of Lowe’s Creative Ideas Network I received gift cards from Lowe’s in order to purchase supplies to complete projects. All opinions are my own.

In El Salvador and many other Latin American countries, the nativity scene, or “nacimiento” is not the quiet, traditional scene most Americans are used to. In addition to Joseph, Mary, baby Jesus, barnyard animals, a shepherd and three wisemen, Salvadoran nativity scenes can take up a whole room and look like an entire village complete with soccer players, musicians, and figures of favorite TV characters.

If you wanted a pupusería (restaurant that sells pupusas) for your nativity this year, you’re in luck! Here’s how you can make your own custom pupusería, either for your nacimiento or to gift to someone as a decoration.

How to make: a Pupusería for your Nacimiento

What you need:

1 primed inside corner crown moulding block
1 pack wide hobby [popsicle] sticks (found in hardware in the drawers labeled “hobby”)
scissors
hot glue gun and glue sticks
Valspar paint samples and/or craft paint in various colors
hobby-size craft paint brushes
cutting pliers
ruler
painter’s tape
newspaper (to protect the surface you’re working on)
paper towels

Optional (to make people or animal figures):
craft board (light, thin wood)
pencil
jigsaw
sandpaper

Directions:

painting-pupuseria-craft-1

First you’re going to want to place some painter’s tape halfway up the “walls” as shown so that you’ll have a clean line when you paint. Many Salvadoran houses are painted in two colors like this, but you can paint it just one color if you wish. You will also want to paint the “roof” a brownish color so that any spots that show through won’t be obvious when you’re done with the roof tiles.

cut-popsicle-sticks

To make the traditional looking “tejas” roof tiles which are popular in parts of El Salvador, you’ll be using the wide popsicle sticks (also called “hobby sticks.) Cut as many as you need with the pliers for the first row which you’ll hot glue to the roof. Mine were about 1 1/2 inches long, but I think it would have worked better if I cut them slightly shorter.

popsicle-stick-edges

For the corners, you may need to cut your roof tiles with the scissors so they’re beveled (see photo.)

starting-roof-1

Once you hot glue the first row, you may find it necessary to put a few layers of hot glue and allow it to harden on parts of the roof before you add the next row to give yourself a more even surface to work on.

roof-teardrop-shape

You may also find that cutting some of the roof tiles in a “tear drop” shape, as shown, will work better in some areas.

roof-complete-before-paint

I’m not going to lie – the roof took a long time and it was far from perfect. I’m definitely not going to be hired as a roofer anytime soon! However, once you have it all tiled, you’re ready to paint it.

roof-complete-with-details

I didn’t have a specific Valspar color on hand that I felt was the right shade so I ended up mixing my own color. You want sort of a dark reddish-orange. After I painted them that color, I used a dry brush in dark brown paint to add a little more detail.

pupuseria-2

Feel free to get creative with whatever details you want to add. As you can see, I painted a little potted plant on the outside wall near the entrance.

As for the figures of the woman and the dog, I just traced their shapes on craft board and cut them out with a jigsaw. Sand the edges until they’re smooth and then you can paint them as you wish.

If you look closely, you can see a little plate of pupusas inside. For that I used a wooden nickel (available in the “hobby” drawer in the Hardware department), which I painted blue. For the pupusas, I used a knife to slice a rubber cork from a wine bottle into little discs and painted them. Once dry, I hot glued the pupusas to the plate and hot glued the plate to the little triangular ledge on the inside.

pupuseria-traisy-1

When I went to paint the pupusería’s sign on a popsicle stick to hot glue to the outside wall, my younger son walked by the table. He pointed to the figure of the woman which I had already painted and he said, “Is that you?” … I decided then that it would be my pupusería. (And yes, I spelled my name the Salvadoran way!)

Want more creative ideas?

Holiday-14-Blogger-Badge_200x200

 

Check out more from Lowe’s Creative Ideas Network by subscribing to their Creative Ideas Magazine and E-Newsletter, following them on Pinterest and by seeing what the other Lowe’s Creative Ideas Network members are up to.

Si buscas inspiración, ¡ven y visita nuestra página de Facebook en español Lowe’s Ideas Creativas!

Relajo Giveaway!

relajo

This spice packet may have cost me less than $3 but don’t be deceived! This imported spice mixture from El Salvador is extremely valuable to anyone who doesn’t have access to it, but who longs to make Salvadoran Panes con Pavo for Thanksgiving. I decided to do this giveaway for those of you who live in parts of the United States where Salvadoran relajo is difficult or impossible to find – so just leave a comment on this post for your chance to win!

====Giveaway Closed! Congratulations to Angie!====

GIVEAWAY DETAILS

Prize description: One lucky winner will receive the item pictured in the photo at the very top of this post: One 3 oz. packet of Mi Canton brand Relajo seasoning.

Approximate value: $3

- How to Enter -

Just leave a comment below! (Please read official rules below before entering.)

Official Rules: No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years of age or older to enter. You must be able to provide a U.S. address for prize shipment. Your name and address will not be shared with any third party. Please no P.O. Boxes. One entry per household. Make sure that you enter a valid email address in the email address field so you can be contacted if you win. Winner will be selected at random. Winner has 24 hours to respond. If winner does not respond within 24 hours, a new winner will be selected at random. Giveaway entries are being accepted between November 11th, 2014 through November 13th, 2014. Entries received after November 13th, 2014 at 11:59 pm EST, will not be considered. The number of eligible entries received determines the odds of winning. If you win, by accepting the prize, you are agreeing that Latinaish.com assumes no liability for damages of any kind. By entering your name below you are agreeing to these Official Rules. Void where prohibited by law.

Buena suerte / Good luck!

Disclosure: I did not receive any product or payment to run this giveaway. Item for giveaway was purchased by me.