Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass

yaqui

Piedad “Piddy” Sanchez doesn’t sit at the “Latino lunch table” in her new school’s cafeteria. With her light skin, good grades, and lack of an accent, the girls at the “Latino” table don’t consider her Latina enough. To make things worse, her body has apparently begun to develop and boys are taking notice. Piddy is accused of “shaking her stuff” when she walks, and Yaqui Delgado, a girl with a reputation and a criminal record, lets it be known that she, along with her gang of friends, are going to kick Piddy’s ass.

If this were Piddy’s only problem, life would be difficult enough, but Piddy is dealing with a lot more than that; a father she’s never met, her best friend moving away, juggling a part-time job with her mother’s impossible expectations – all while trying to figure out that inevitable coming-of-age question, “Who am I?”

Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass by Meg Medina is a YA (Young Adult) novel that took me, (as a 30-something year old), right back to the insecure days of the high school hallway. I read this book in one sitting and loved it – If I had a teenage daughter, I would be putting it into her hands right now. (I have a teenage son and I’ll try to convince him to read it, but it seems boys never want to read books with a female protagonist.)

Piddy’s voice feels authentic; her situation and the challenges she faces are ones a lot of teenage girls, (Latina and otherwise), are going to relate to. The diverse cast of characters are equally complex and real. These are the kinds of Latino/a characters we need more of, in YA literature especially.

One word of caution – Piddy is 15 years old, going on 16. There are some mature themes and I would recommend this book for girls no younger than 13 years old.

Want to read this book? Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass by Meg Medina comes out March 2013 – Until then, you can enter the giveaway below!

—THIS GIVEAWAY HAS CLOSED. CONGRATULATIONS TO “SQUEEZE”—

THE GIVEAWAY

Prize description: One lucky winner will receive a copy of the book, Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass by Meg Medina.

Approximate value: $11.00

How to Enter:

Just leave a comment below telling me why you want to read this book, or why you want to win it for someone else. (Please read official rules below.)

Official Rules: No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years of age or older to enter. You must be able to provide a U.S. address for prize shipment. Your name and address will only be shared with the company in charge of prize fulfillment. Please no P.O. Boxes. One entry per household. Make sure that you enter a valid E-mail address in the E-mail address field so you can be contacted if you win. Winner will be selected at random. Winner has 48 hours to respond. If the winner does not respond within 48 hours, a new winner will be selected at random. Giveaway entries are being accepted between January 29th, 2013 through February 12th, 2013. Entries received after February 12th, 2013 at 11:59 pm EST, will not be considered. Realize that the prize can not be shipped until the publish date in late March 2013. The number of eligible entries received determines the odds of winning. If you win, by accepting the prize, you are agreeing that Latinaish.com assumes no liability for damages of any kind. By entering your name below you are agreeing to these Official Rules. Void where prohibited by law.

Buena suerte!

Disclosure: This is not a paid or sponsored post. I received an advance reading copy of this book for review purposes. All opinions are my own.

#101HispanicWaysToDie

#101HispanicWaysToDie was a trending topic on social network Twitter today.

The range of responses to the hashtag was interesting. The vast majority, including myself, had fun with the hashtag – just some light-hearted joking around. Others became nostalgic for childhood, even when it meant remembering being smacked with a chancla. Some people expressed disgust at the hashtag, possibly assuming the worst, and not actually checking it out. Then there were the racists who couldn’t resist jumping in and talking about illegal border crossing – decidedly NOT funny.

One Latina tweeted “say [to your parents] you’re going out with a moreno” – It was unclear whether the person who wrote it meant it seriously, as an honest commentary on their reality, or if they were trying to be humorous. This unfunny tweet which points out the racist tendencies of some parents, was re-tweeted 301 times and favorited 119 times at last count and there were other similar tweets which, perhaps reflect a sad reality that deserves more discussion en la comunidad latina.

Whenever there’s a trending hashtag on Twitter, you’re going to get this diverse mix of funny, honest and offensive. I jumped in and tried to keep my tweets light and funny. Here they are re-purposed for this blog post. Feel free to add your own in comments!

13 Latino Ways to Die

1. Suffocation after too much Vicks Vapo-Rub has been put up your nostrils.

2. Pine-Sol and bleach fumes after your mother cleans the house.

3. Setting off illegal fireworks.

4. Third degree cheese burns from not allowing the pupusa to cool before attempting to consume.

5. Laughing with your siblings during misa.

6. Accidentally telling your Mom that you’re “embarazada” when you actually mean to say you’re embarrassed.

7. Parents use a lesson from the old country. You respond “But we’re not in El Salvador! We’re in the United States!”

8. Empacho

9. Riding in the back of a pickup truck.

10. Laughing when your parent translates a Spanish idiom to English but it makes no sense.

11. Rooting for the U.S. team when they play your parent’s home country in soccer.

12. Kicked in the nalgas by a bota picuda.

13. Making too much noise in the room when your abuela is trying to hear her horoscope from Walter Mercado.

Update! Related Link: #101HispanicWaysToDie Shows True Colors on ModernMami.com

The Cone of Fire – El Cono de Fuego

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation is below!

El otro fin de semana, Carlos tenía dolor de oido, sentía que tenía fluido por dentro, y me pidió una cura. Empecé a enumerar los remedios caseros, pero Carlos no estaba entusiasmado por ninguno de ellos. Entonces me acordé de una pintura de Carmen Lomas Garza llamado Ventosa, que muestra un cono hecho de periódico con fuego en el oído de alguien. Le conté a Carlos y quiso hacerlo.

Hice un poco de investigación y luego decidimos probarlo. La primera vez lo hicimos en el comedor y eso era un gran error. El suelo en nuestra casa es alfombra y algunas cenizas empezaron a caer, creando un peligro de incendio. Cuando el fuego en el cono creció me dio pánico y no sabía cómo apagarlo. Abrí la puerta de atrás y lo tiré al patio.

Después Carlos me dijo que no se sentía mejor y unas horas más tarde quería tratar otra vez. Esta vez lo hicimos en la bañera, pero una vez más cuando el fuego creció un poco fuera de control, me ponía nerviosa. Yo creo que este remedio casero es demasiado peligroso por casas en los Estados Unidos, la mayoría que son hechas de puras cosas inflamables.

Al final, Carlos dijo que el “cono de fuego”, como lo llamamos, realmente no le ayudaba. Intenté uno de los primeros remedios que había mencionado originalmente – gotitas de aceite de oliva en el oído. Ahora se siente mejor.

¿Tienes experiencia con el “cono de fuego”? Funciona para ti?

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

The other weekend, Carlos had an earache – he felt like he had fluid in his ear and he asked me for a cure. I started to list home remedies I knew of, but Carlos wasn’t enthusiastic about any of them. Then I remembered a Carmen Lomas Garza painting called Ventosa, which shows a newspaper cone of fire in someone’s ear. I told Carlos about it and he wanted to do it.

I did a little research and then decided to try it. The first time we did it in the dining room which was a big mistake. The flooring is carpet in our house and some ash began to fall, creating a fire hazard. When the fire grew bigger on the cone I panicked and didn’t know how to put it out. I unlocked the back door and threw it onto the patio.

Afterward Carlos told me he wasn’t feeling better and a few hours later he wanted to try again. This time we did it in the bathtub, but again when the fire grew a little out of control, I got nervous. I think this home remedy is too dangerous for homes in the United States, which are made ​​of purely flammable things.

In the end, Carlos said the “cone of fire”, as we call it, didn’t really help. I tried one of the first remedies that I had originally mentioned – drops of olive oil in the ear. Now he feels better.

Do you have experience with the “cone of fire?” – Does it work for you?

Fiesta DC 2012

Taking photos at Fiesta DC this past Sunday was a challenge for a number of reasons, but one of those reasons was the sheer number of other people trying to photograph and video tape the event. At times I felt like I was in a group of paparazzi fighting for position – and then when I would finally frame the perfect shot, someone would inevitably ruin it by running across with a video camera or sticking their iPhone in front of me.

Some of the people were amateur or hobbyist photographers like me, some were obviously freelance professionals or working for media – And then there were young males, usually equipped with cellphone cameras, who were just trying to photograph the nalgas of the cachiporras to share on their Facebook.

Anyway, here are my favorite shots which I had some fun editing and a video of the general atmosphere.

By the way, speaking of nalgas, at one point during the parade a woman with a very generous backside stood in front of us. Carlos, to his credit, didn’t even seem to notice despite the fact that her “pants” were actually leggings and you could see her thong through the fabric.

“¡Qué bárbara!” a little old man said. The old man, not content to enjoy the view by himself and feeling the need to share, elbowed Carlos. Jutting his chin towards the woman in front of them he said, with a lascivious expression on his face, “Ella es Santa Bárbara, ¿vá?”

Carlos looked confused, “Oh, ¿sí?” he replied.
“Ssssíííííí,” the viejo hissed appraising the woman’s behind, practically licking his lips. Noting the fact that Carlos didn’t understand what he meant, the viejo then asked, “¿No sabes?”

“¿No?” Carlos said, the question on his face.

I rolled my eyes at the predictable dirty old man.

“¡Es santa por delante y bárbara por atrás!” the viejo said, erupting in laughter as if he had said the most clever and original thing in the world.

Carlos laughed politely and I pinched him.

“What?” Carlos said.
“Stand back here, away from the viejo chuco,” I said.

After the parade we had lunch. I wanted pupusas but Carlos made a good point that we eat pupusas all the time and that we should eat something different, so we ended up buying delicious Mexican tortas. (The boys and I had the torta milanesa de pollo with horchata. Carlos had the torta de carnitas with agua fresca de tamarindo.)

Just as we finished eating and were deciding what to do next, I heard “Los Hermanos Lovo” announced on a nearby stage.

“No way!” I said out loud, “Hermanos Lovo!”

Carlos looked at me like I had lost my mind as I pulled his hand in the direction of the stage.

“It’s the Chanchona music I blogged about. Remember?… Hermanos Lovo!”

For three songs I tapped my hand against my side, tapped my feet, and moved my hips, waiting for people to dance, but only a few people were dancing, and they were getting stared at. Everyone else just pretty much stood there and watched the performance. I found this a little strange given that at most Latino dominant events I’ve been too, there’s usually not a lack of dancing. I wonder if most of the people there have become too Americanized in this respect? Too self-conscious?

I couldn’t take it anymore. I leaned toward Carlos and he leaned toward me so he could hear me.

“Want to dance?” I asked, eyes brimming with hope like a child asking for a puppy.

Carlos said nothing, just turned toward me and took me in his arms, and we danced.

Within seconds much of the crowd had turned to look at us and stood gaping. Carlos whispered in my ear, “We’re being photographed and video taped.” I felt a flood of gringa self-consciousness wash through me but we kept dancing, and soon, the people around us, were just a blur of colors.

Stories from el Corazón

On SpanglishBaby I talked about a non-profit organization called Story Corps which records people’s true stories to create a sort of archive of American history for future generations. Some of these stories have been animated, and I shared a really hilarious yet heartwarming video from the Story Corps collection called Facundo the Great – (go check it out on SpanglishBaby!)

While I clicked around on the Story Corps website, I found several other animated stories I loved just as much as Facundo the Great. Here are two more, and if you love them mucho, check out Story Corps for más.

PBS Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

PBS is celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15th to October 15th with some programming you might want to go mark on your calendar!

Title: EL VELADOR (The Night Watchman)
Date: September 27th 2012 / 10:00-11:00 PM ET
Description: “Stand guard with Martin, who watches over the extravagant mausoleums of notorious Mexican drug lords.”

Preview:

Title: HAVANA, HAVANA!
Date: July 27th 2012 / 9:00-10:00 PM ET
Description: “Tap your toes to the beat of this music documentary, which vibrates with the soul and energy of African-Cuban drummers, guajira guitarists and the pulsing melodies of celebrated Cuban musician Raul Paz, who brings together fellow musical stars Descemer Bueno, Kelvis Ochoa and David Torrens for a concert in Havana…”

Preview:

Title: BIBLIOBURRO: The Donkey Library
Date: Check local listings
Description: “A decade ago, Colombian grade-school teacher Luis Soriano was inspired to spend his weekends bringing a modest collection of precious books, via two hard-working donkeys, to the children of Magdalena Province’s poor and violence-ridden interior. As Soriano braves armed bands, drug traffickers, snakes and heat, his library on hooves carries an inspirational message about education and a better future for Colombia.”

Preview:

TALES OF MASKED MEN
Date: September 28th 2012 / 10:00-11:00 PM ET
Description: “…the fascinating, mysterious world of lucha libre and its role in Latino communities in the United States, Mexico and Latin America…”

Preview:

Other programming to check your local listings for:

NOT IN OUR TOWN: LIGHT IN THE DARKNESS
Description: “Witness the efforts of villagers to confront anti-immigrant bias and repair the fabric of community life.”

MARIACHI HIGH
Description: “Spend a year in the life of the champion mariachi ensemble at Zapata High School in South Texas.”

And more!

Mexican Sushi & Other Fusion Foods

I love fusion cuisine – the mixing of the best parts of two different cultures on one plate. It takes a lot of creativity to come up with something that works.

A month or so ago, I came upon this photo of the “Blaxican Food Truck” (Mexican & Soul Food) and this conversation on Reddit.

Image source: Reddit user J_Keezey

There was talk of jalapeño mac-and-cheese, BBQ steak tacos (sounds as crazy as my Fried Chicken & Mashed Potato Tacos!), and collard green quesadillas.

When I saw yesterday that CNN had interviewed the owner of the truck, it reminded me that I wanted to write about this here.

(Here’s CNN’s interview)

However, there are all kinds of Latin American fusion foods to explore.

Taka Taka in New York features Mexican Sushi and Japanese Tacos. On the menu? Cilantro shrimp tempura; Fried rice roll with hamachi, tuna, avocado and jicama with spicy sriracha mayonnaise; and Fried tuna carnitas in a yuzu-soy marinate with guacamole and pico de gallo in corn tortillas.

Chino Bandido in Phoenix allows you to mix various Chinese and Mexican ingredients. Chico & Chang in Atlanta also serves Chinese and Mexican food but they don’t seem to be mixed based on the menu which lists the cuisines separately.

And then most everyone knows about Kogi BBQ which were all anyone talked about a few years ago when people discovered their Korean-style tacos.

I think the most delicious out of all of these is Mexican Sushi. The combination seems like it was inevitable. Carlos and I love sushi and our two favorite local sushi chefs are both Mexican. In fact, Latinos work behind the scenes at all our favorite Asian restaurants – Chinese, Japanese, Korean.

In comments here on Latinaish, I once mentioned that many of the Latino employees at our favorite Korean market speak Korean.

…We have a Korean Market on the outskirts of D.C. where I make regular visits. (I love Korean food and got Carlos hooked on it too.)… Well, almost all the people that work there are Latino. It’s hilarious because one time at the fish counter Suegra told me what she wanted, I turned to the fish counter manager who was Korean. I greeted him in Korean and then told him Suegra’s order in English. He turned to the guys behind him and told them the order in Spanish. I was like, “Wait a minute! Suegra should have just ordered herself?!” …Also, I’ve heard some of the Latinos there respond to the manager in Korean. It’s pretty cool!

I actually read a story about this Honduran guy who came to the U.S. and began working in a Vietnamese restaurant. He started out washing dishes and ended up learning Vietnamese and working as head chef. [Read more here.] Chévere, right?

As for the Mexican Sushi, unfortunately, I’m a little too far from New York to just pop in at Taka Taka for lunch … pero hay esperanza! Our friends at Tiki Tiki posted a video to their Facebook page that teaches you how to make “Sushi Mexicano.” (I recommend giving Tiki Tiki a “Like” – they’re always sharing fascinating and hilarious content.)

Here’s the video by the very amusing “El Guzii“!

This looks like a lot of work but these fusion restaurants seem to be only in major cities, so it’s a good option if you want to try it. Then again, I found this restaurant in our area.

Felicio’s authentic Mexican and Italian food. The nice thing about this one is that the Italian and Mexican flags have the same colors so I’d assume there was no arguing over the logo or the decor. I actually haven’t eaten here yet, (Carlos has refused), but I think that this isn’t actually true fusion and that the menu items are separate.

What fusion restaurants have you seen?