Category Archives: música

Raul y Mexia

raulymexia

I discover new music every day but a couple weeks ago when I had one of our Spanish-language satellite music channels playing on the television as background noise while I worked, I heard a song that literally made me stop in my tracks. I had gone to the kitchen to grab a bottle of water – (also known as procrastinating. Funny how thirsty you can get when you have writer’s block) – but I could hear the last song end and a new song begin. After a few notes I stopped and listened. By the time the song got to the hook, I had run to grab a pen and paper to write down the name of the song and artist. I wrote down:

Yo También
Raul y Mexia

After a little research I discovered that the album this song is on, “Arriba y Lejos”, actually came out last year, and the brothers Raul y Mexia are the sons of none other than Hernán Hernández, the bassist for Los Tigres del Norte. They call their music “cumbia campechana” – (“campechana” being a mixed seafood cocktail in Mexico) – which is an excellent description of their unique sound. I ended up loving the whole album, with “Ay Amor” being my second favorite song after “Yo También.”

Here’s a great article about them from the NY Times. I loved this quote:

“I was a skater and into rock music and totally not into what my parents maybe expected me to be into,” said Mexia, 33, who eventually gravitated to hip-hop, memorizing Luke Skyywalker and Gucci Crew records. “My dad would come home from tour speaking Spanish, and I would only want to speak English. He’d be like, ‘Mijo, come over here, let me teach you how to play this song, let me tell you about Mexico,’ and I was like, ‘Aw come on, Dad.’ I just wanted to be out on the streets with my friends.” – source: NY Times

So maybe, I’m a little late on this one, but I’m now a fan of Raul y Mexia.

Who is your new favorite Spanish-speaking music artist?

Calles de Tierra

Image source: Flickr user Mircea Turcan

Image source: Flickr user Mircea Turcan

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Descubrí un hermoso poema escrito por un poeta mexicano sobre la vida en la zona rural de México que quiero compartir. Aquí está:

Calles de Tierra

Nunca voy a olvidarme del rancho
siempre voy a sentirme orgulloso
como extraño sus calles de tierra
cuando bebíamos agua del pozo.

A las cuatro los gallos cantaban
a las cinco ladraban los perros
a las seis el molino da vueltas
y al trabajo van los jornaleros.

Un pedazo de tierra sembrado
Cuatro vacas, un puerco en engorda
Una yunta jalando el arado
y mi apa’ desgranando mazorca.

El comal con la leña del cerro
y mi abuela torteando a las siete
los frijoles hirviendo en la hoya
y mi abuelo afilando el machete.

Un sombrero viejo y maltratado
tres camisas y dos pantalones
los huaraches ya están desgastados
pero no me da vergüenza ser pobre.

Nunca voy a olvidarme del rancho
siempre voy a sentirme orgulloso
como extraño sus calles de tierra
y a las señoras con su rebozo.

Bueno, tengo una confesión. Esta “poema” es en realidad letras escritas por Espinoza Paz. Sé que algunas personas desprecian a Espinoza Paz. Algunas personas lo llaman “naco” y no ven su valor, pero yo quería demostrar que cuando uno lee estas letras como un poema de un poeta anónimo, se puede ver la hermosura de las palabras; uno puede ver que hay corazón y talento detrás de las palabras. Esta es una lección, espero, en no juzgar basada en la superficie de las cosas; mejor buscamos más profundo e intentar una perspectiva diferente.

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

I found a beautiful poem written by a Mexican poet about life in rural Mexico I want to share. Here is my translation of the poem to English (which doesn’t do it justice):

Dirt Roads


I’ll never forget the ranch,
I will always be proud,
How I miss its dirt roads,
When we would drink water from the well.

At four o’clock the roosters crowed,
At five the dogs barked,
At six the mill spins,
and the laborers go to work.

A piece of land sown,
Four cows, a pig being fattened,
Oxen pulling a plow,
And my father threshing corn.

The griddle with the firewood from the hill,
My grandmother making tortillas at 7 o’clock,
The beans boiling in the pot,
And my grandfather sharpening the machete.

A hat, old and battered,
Three shirts and two pants,
Sandals that are already worn out,
but I’m not ashamed to be poor.

I’ll never forget the ranch,
I will always be proud,
How I miss its dirt roads,
And the ladies with their ​​shawls.

Okay, I have a confession. This “poem” is actually lyrics written by Espinoza Paz. I know some people look down on Espinoza Paz. Some people call him “naco” and don’t see his value, but I wanted to show that when one reads these lyrics as a poem by an anonymous poet, you can see how beautiful the words are; one can see that there is heart and talent behind the words. This is a lesson, I hope, not to judge based on surface things; we should instead look deeper and try a different perspective.

#VidaConCricket and Muve Music

muvemusic

Disclosure: Latinaish.com has partnered with Cricket Wireless as a 2014 Blog Ambassador. All opinions are my own.

For those who don’t yet know, my whole family has become 2014 blog ambassadors for Cricket Wireless. I’m really excited about this partnership because this is the first time I’ve owned a smartphone. Figuring out how to do everything on a Samsung Galaxy s4 after years of using the most basic of phones wasn’t easy at first, but after a day or two, I became much more comfortable with it. The first week with a smartphone is learning how to use it and the second week is learning how to put it down and leave it alone for a little while!

One of thing that has surprised me the most with my Cricket Wireless service is the Muve Music feature. I was told that I would have unlimited song downloads from Muve Music with my phone but to be honest, I thought that if they’re being so generous with unlimited downloads, then the music available would be by completely unknown artists, or that there would only be poor quality covers of famous songs. I also expected there to be little music in Spanish – I soon discovered I had been really wrong with my assumptions!

The Muve Music store (which is accessed on my phone through an app that comes pre-installed), has had most songs I have wanted so far. I have downloaded almost every Espinoza Paz song I love, Juanes, Voz de Mando, Shakira, Pitbull, Celso Piña, Calle 13, 3BallMTY, and even Crooked Stilo, Los Hermanos Flores and Pedro Infante. Overall I’m really satisfied with the selection, (and my two teenage sons have also found almost all the songs they wanted in English!) … Carlos is less thrilled about my full Espinoza Paz playlist, but that’s a story for another day.

You can learn more about Muve Music and Cricket Wireless in Spanish here, or in English here. You can also follow the #VidaConCricket hashtag and @MiCricket on Twitter.

Shania Twain, Mexican-style

rogelio-martinez

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

En mi carro tenemos una suscripción gratuita de 3 meses de radio por satélite. Honestamente, la mayoría de las estaciones no me gustan pero hay una que sí me gusta mucho, especialmente porque el tipo de música que tocan, (regional mexicano) no está disponible aquí en las estaciones de radio regulares.

En la estación hay muchas canciones que ya conozco, y también estoy descubriendo nuevas canciones que me encantan. El otro día ellos tocaban una canción que no conocía, pero sí concocía. Pero, ¿cómo es posible no conocer y conocer a una canción?

Bueno, te digo que fue. La canción empezó y sin pensar, empecé a cantar:

Looks like we made it,
Look how far we’ve come my baby,
We might have took the long way,
We knew we’d get there someday…

Pronto me di cuenta de que yo estaba cantando en inglés y la canción estaba en español. Es que este artista mexicano, Rogelio Martínez, hizo una traducción en español de una canción vieja de Shania Twain. Oigan:

Así que, ahora tengo esta canción bien metida y bien mezclada en mi mente.

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

In my car we have a 3-month free subscription to a satellite radio service. Honestly, I don’t like most of the stations but there is one that I do like, especially because the type of music they play (Regional Mexican) isn’t available on the regular radio stations.

On the station there are a lot of songs I know, and I’m also discovering new songs that I love. The other day they played a song that I didn’t know, but I knew. But, how is it possible to not know yet know a song?

Well, I’ll tell you what happened. The song started and without thinking, I began to sing:

Looks like we made it,
Look how far we’ve come my baby,
We might have took the long way,
We knew we’d get there someday…

Soon I realized I was singing in English and the song was in Spanish. It’s that the Mexican singer, Rogelio Martínez, had made a Spanish translation of an old Shania Twain song.

So now I have the song really stuck and really mixed up in my head.

Bohemian Shakira-style Brass Washer Bracelet

bracelet_latinaish_604

As a member of Lowe’s Creative Ideas Network I received gift cards from Lowe’s in order to purchase supplies to complete projects. All opinions are my own.

I don’t know why, but whenever I see an armful of pretty bohemian-style bracelets I think of Colombian singer, Shakira, and she’s the inspiration for this bracelet made of simple yet surprisingly elegant-looking materials. Cotton string and brass washers are re-imagined into a piece of jewelry that will be sure to attract attention and compliments. With the holidays soon upon us, this is an idea you may want to add to your list of crafts to try. It’s affordable and quick to make, plus your favorite amiga, hermana, sobrina or prima will be sure to love it.

Bohemian Shakira-style Brass Washer Bracelet

What you need:

10 to 20 flat brass washers (small #8S, Blue Hawk/HILLMAN)
string (Blue Hawk twisted cotton twine)
scissors
sticky tape

Directions:

1. Cut 4 pieces of twine to 4 feet long.
2. Tie the pieces together at the top leaving about 4 inches above the knot. (See photo below.)
3. Tape the knot to a surface to secure in place.
4. Tie string #1 around strings #2 and #3 in this way: String #1 goes OVER strings #2 and #3 then comes back UNDER strings #2 and #3, then over itself.) Pull gently so the loop moves up and tightens at the top. (See photo below.)
5. Tie string #4 around strings #2 and #3 in the same way as described in step 4. (Note that strings #2 and #3 always remain together in the middle.) Repeat step 4 and step 5 about five to six times.
6. Slide a washer onto string #1 or #4 (alternate) before tying around strings #2 and #3. Repeat step 4 and 5 before adding another washer. Keep repeating steps 4, 5, and 6 until bracelet is long enough to tie around your wrist.
7. Tie the bracelet off the same way you tied the strings together at the top in step 2.
8. Cut off any undesired excess string.
9. Bracelet is worn tied around the wrist, (I double knot it to keep it from falling off.)

The supplies

The supplies

The method.

The method.

Check out more from Lowe’s Creative Ideas Network by subscribing to their Creative Ideas Magazine and E-Newsletter, following them on Pinterest, and by seeing what the other Lowe’s Creative Ideas Network members are up to.

Que Llueva, Que Llueva

cloud

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Recientemente ha estado lloviendo mucho por aquí, hasta que el techo comenzó a gotear. Un día empecé a cantar “It’s Raining, It’s Pouring” – una canción en inglés que casi todos los niños aprenden en los Estados Unidos cuando están chiquitos. Cuando terminé de cantar, Carlos empezó a cantar en español.

“Que llueva, que llueva,
la Virgen de la Cueva,
los pajaritos cantan,
las nubes se levantan.
¡Que sí, que no!
¡Que caiga un chaparrón!”

Nunca he oído la canción “Que Llueva, Que Llueva” pero Carlos me explicó que es la canción que cantan los niños en El Salvador cuando llueve. Me pregunté yo misma si hay una canción infantil para la lluvia en cada idioma – Me encantaría escuchar otras.

Si no conoces como se cantan las canciones, aquí tengo grabado a Carlos cantándola en español, y una grabación de mí cantándola en inglés!

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Lately it’s been raining a lot here, so much so that our roof started to leak. One day I started to sing “It’s Raining, It’s Pouring” – a song in English that almost all children in the United States learn to sing when they’re little. When I finished singing, Carlos started to sing in Spanish.

“Que llueva, que llueva,
la Virgen de la Cueva,
los pajaritos cantan,
las nubes se levantan.
¡Que sí, que no!
¡Que caiga un chaparrón!”

I had never heard the song “Que Llueva, Que Llueva” but Carlos explained that this is the song that children in El Salvador sing when it rains. It made me wonder if there are children’s songs for rain in every language – I would love to hear others.

If you don’t know how to sing these songs, here I have a recording of Carlos singing it in Spanish, and a recording of myself singing it in English!

5 Vídeos Favoritos – Agosto 2013

5vids

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation in italics!

Ya saben que siempre estoy colectando vídeos que me gustan para compartir con ustedes. Estos son mis vídeos favoritos en este momento! // You guys already know that I’m always collecting videos that I like so I can share them with you. Here are my favorite videos at this moment!

#1. No, no es un Justin Bieber Colombiano – es una parodia que hizo un taxista en Medellín. // No, it’s not a Colombian Justin Bieber – it’s a parody made by a taxi driver in Medellin.

#2. Tienes que escapar de los Zetas? Haganles una pizza como este dichoso salvadoreño – ¡Guau! // Need to escape from the Zetas? Make them a pizza like this lucky Salvadoran. Wow!

#3. Miren estas cipotas subiendo el árbol sin miedo y con tanta habilidad! Qué lindas son! // Look at these girls climb the tree without any fear and so much skill! How cute they are!

#4. Conan O’Brien aprende malas palabras en español por Diego Luna. // Conan O’Brien learns bad words in Spanish from Diego Luna.

#5. Mi amiga Maricela me dijo que el documental “Hecho en México” ya está disponible en Netflix. Se ve buenísimo. // My friend Maricela told me this documentary, “Hecho en Mexico” is now available on Netflix. It looks really good.

Do What Makes You Feliz

felicidad

This morning I looked up “Dichos de Lupita” on YouTube because I was in the mood to hear the song, but instead of an official video from Los Tucanes de Tijuana, I came across this video. I don’t know why, but it really made my day.

Maybe it made me happy because I can tell he loves what he’s doing and he’s made time to do it. I don’t know the real story behind why this guy makes accordion videos in what seems to possibly be a closet or very small room inside a brick building (perhaps a school?) while wearing a uniform with his apellido on it, but I imagine he does these videos on his lunch break at work for his own enjoyment. I also imagine people walking by in the hallway must hear him in there sometimes and smile to themselves – at least I would.

Whatever the story is, I like his voice and his accordion playing, and I love that he’s doing something that makes him happy – That’s what life is all about.

On a side note, if any native Spanish-speaker from Mexico could find it in their heart to translate the lyrics to English, I’d be most grateful. When I sing along I don’t understand half the song and I’m not sure if it’s because the words are so very Mexican or if they’re completely invented. “Yuju yuju yuju, chupale pichón, lero lero lero, si chuy como ño” isn’t exactly in the Diccionario Real Academia. All I got out of that whole stanza is “suck a pigeon” which I’m assuming is a colorful idiom not appropriate for polite company?

Club Glee

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

clubglee

Hoy quiero introducirles a mi nueva causa favorita en El Salvador. Glasswing International es una organización independiente, y tienen muchas valiosas iniciativas que estoy planeando apoyar con mi dinero – y ojalá un día cuando regresamas a El Salvador, con mi tiempo. De las iniciativas que tienen, Club Glee es una de mis favoritas. En Club Glee, los jovenes aprenden como cantar y bailar – pero es mucho más que esto. Los jovenes que participaron aprenden cooperación, se sienten aceptados, hacen amigos, y ganan confianza. Al final, programas así no sólo ayudan a los niños, pero también el futuro del pais porque está creando mejores ciudadanos.

Aquí hay un video que realmente me llegó al corazón. Chécalo.

Si quieres apoyar a programas como Club Glee, aprender de sus otras programs, (incluyendo programas en Guatemala y Honduras), o seguir sus perfiles de medios de comunicación social – dale una visita a Glasswing.org [en inglés], o en español AQUÍ.

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Today I want to introduce you to my new favorite cause in El Salvador. Glasswing International is an independent organization, and they have many worthwhile initiatives that I’m planning to support with my money – and hopefully one day when we return to El Salvador, with my time. Of the initiatives they have, Club Glee is one of my favorites. In Club Glee, the youth learn how to sing and dance – but it’s much more than that. The young people who participate in the program learn cooperation, feel accepted, make friends, and gain confidence. In the end, programs such as this not only help the children but also help the future of the country because it’s creating better citizens.

Here is a video that really touched my heart. Check it out.

If you want to support programs like Club Glee, learn about their other programs (including programs in Guatemala and Honduras), or follow them in social media – give them a visit at Glasswing.org [English] or in Spanish HERE.

Helado y La Lambada

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Image source: Flickr user .imelda

Image source: Flickr user .imelda

Yo estaba trabajando en la yarda cuando escuché el camión de helados en la calle. Paré y escuché. La canción me sonaba muy familiar y no fue “Pop Goes the Weasel” – (una canción común utilizado por los camiones de helados en los Estados Unidos.)

Empecé a cantar a mí misma … “Llorando se fue la que un día me hizo llorar…” – Qué qué?! Pero, estos son las letras de la canción de “Taboo” por Don Omar! … Cuando me di cuenta de que el camión estaba tocando La Lambada, (que Don Omar utilizó en su canción), agarré mi teléfono celular y tomé vídeo cuando el camión se fue saliendo de mi barrio. Chécalo!

ENGLISH TRANSLATION

Ice Cream and The Lambada

I was outside working in the yard when I heard the ice cream truck in the street. I stopped and listened. The song sounded familiar but it wasn’t “Pop Goes the Weasel” – (a common song used by ice cream trucks in the United States.)

I started to sing to myself… “Llorando se fue la que un día me hizo llorar…” – What in the world?! But these were the lyrics to the song “Taboo” by Don Omar!… When I realized the truck was playing The Lambada, (which Don Omar sampled in his song), I grabbed my cellphone and took video as the ice cream truck was leaving the neighborhood. Check it out!

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