Flor de Toloache

flor

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Durante el último par de años Jenny Schweitzer ha trabajado en la creación de Rhythm in Motion, una serie documental en 10 partes cortas que retrata a músicos del metro de Nueva York en colaboración con la Autoridad Metropolitana de Transporte. Las películas están siendo publicadas en The Atlantic. La primera película, Flor de Toloache, cuenta con una banda de mariachis exclusivamente femenina que desafía las normas tradicionales del género. Me encanta!

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

For the past couple of years Jenny Schweitzer has worked on creating Rhythm in Motion, a 10-part short documentary series portraying NYC’s subway musicians in collaboration with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. The films are now being published on The Atlantic. The first film, Flor de Toloache, features an all-female mariachi band that challenges traditional gender norms. I love this so much!

Fresqui-Top

Fresqui-Top

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Recibí un email de una lectora con la pregunta: “¿Qué es fresqueto? Mi esposo salvadoreño me dijo que es una bebida popular con los niños en El Salvador pero cuando fuimos a la tienda él me enseñó un bote de Kool-Aid.”

Bueno, primero pensé que ella malentendió la palabra “refresquito” pero para asegurarme, pregunté a Carlos. Inmediatamente Carlos respondió, “Ah, ella quiere decir Fresqui-Top.”

Aparentemente es una bebida con sabores de fruta que viene en paquetes de polvo igual que Kool-Aid. Eso bebía Carlos en El Salvador cuando era niño.

¿Recuerdas Fresqui-Top?

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

I received an email from a reader with the question: “What’s ‘fresqueto’? My Salvadoran husband told me it’s a popular drink with kids in El Salvador but when we went to the store he showed me a canister of Kool-Aid.”

Well, at first I thought she had misunderstood the word “refresquito” (a little refreshment/drink) but to make sure, I asked Carlos. Immediately Carlos responded, “Oh, she means Fresqui-Top.”

Apparently Fresqui-Top is a powdered drink that comes in packets of various fruit flavors just like Kool-Aid. This is what Carlos drank in El Salvador when he was a boy.

Do you remember Fresqui-Top?

(Image source)

Pingüino Rodríguez

notes

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Ustedes ya saben cuanto me gusta el tema de malentendidos entre lenguajes, entonces les presento este video bien chistoso sobre hispanohablantes que cantan mal las letras de canciones en inglés. ¡Disfrutenlo!

(Gracias a Nyn Vasquez por mandarme el video!)

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

You guys already know how much I like the topic of misunderstandings between languages, and so I present this really humorous video about Spanish-speakers singing incorrect lyrics to songs in English. Enjoy!

(Hat tip to Nyn Vasquez!)

Multiracial Kids, Latino Lit, Jane the Virgin Quiz, and Latin American Foods to Eat Before You Die

Well, that might be the longest and most inelegant title I’ve ever written for a blog post, pero no quería marear la perdiz. (If you didn’t know, that’s a Spanish-language idiom for “I didn’t want to beat around the bush.” It literally means “I didn’t want to make the partridge dizzy.” How much cuter is that?)

Anyway, I just wanted to put up a quick post with links to all my latinamom.me posts for the month of February in case you missed any of them. I hope you’ll check them all out and let me know which you liked best so I have an idea of which stories I should write more of in the future. Here we go!

8 Things Moms of Multiracial Kids Are Tired of Hearing

The first is an animated gif post which is a little controversial! My editor asked who wanted to write on the topic of stupid things people say to the parents of biracial or multiracial children, and I volunteered. I usually try to steer clear of topics that get people steamed in any way because I prefer to focus on the positive, but I knew I had some important things to say on this issue so I’m happy I wrote it. [Read it here.]

Latino Lit to Warm Up the Winter

latino-books-2015-2

The second post is book recommendations. I’ve been in kind of a reading rut so I can’t wait for some of the soon-to-be-published Latino Lit to finally be available! (What’s on your “to read” list that you’re most looking forward to right now?) [Read it here.]

Which Jane The Virgin Character Are You?

which-jane-character

This third post was incredibly fun to create because it was the first quiz I designed and it’s all about “Jane The Virgin” – which is my favorite show right now. (A close second would be “Fresh Off the Boat.” Are you watching that, too?) Anyway, let me know which result you got on this quiz and if you felt it was accurate! [Take the quiz here!]

Latin American Foods to Eat Before You Die

143-93709-6-mixto-joel-sowers-1424388693(Image source: Joel Sowers)

My last piece for latinamom.me for the month of February is “Latin American Foods to Eat Before You Die” – (I know, the title is just a tiny bit dramatic.) It was difficult to choose just 10 foods though and the hunger I felt while putting that post together was painful. If you could have any of the foods mentioned in the post magically appear before you right now, (but just one!) – which would it be? [Read it here.]

Una gata, un sapito, y un perico

gaty

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Ayer Carlos me enseño un vídeo para la canción “Gaty Zumbao” por Las Nenas de Caña, un grupo musical salvadoreño.

Después de verlo, desafié a Carlos – “Piensa en dos más vídeos musicales de El Salvador que cuentan con la tema de los animales.”

¡Se tomó menos de cinco minutos!

El Baile del Sapito – Grupo Bongo

(¿Quién necesita CrossFit? El Baile del Sapito es buen ejercicio.)

El Perico Preguntón – Los Caballeros del Sabor

¿Puedes pensar en otra canción salvadoreña acerca de los animales?

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Yesterday Carlos showed me a video for the song “Gaty Zumbao” by Las Nenas de Caña, a Salvadoran music group.

After seeing it, I challenged Carlos – “Think of two more music videos from El Salvador that are also about animals.”

He took less than five minutes!

El Baile del Sapito – Grupo Bongo

(Who needs CrossFit? “The Little Toad Dance” is good exercise.)

El Perico Preguntón – Los Caballeros del Sabor
[Rough translation: “The Nosey Parakeet” by Los Caballeros del Sabor.]

Can you think of another Salvadoran song about animals?

Corazones de Pañito para Día de San Valentín

doily-hearts

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

¿Necesitas una manualidad rapida y accesible para el Día de San Valentín? Estos corazones de papel en forma de pañito sólo cuestan $1 por paquete de 30 en la tienda Dollar Tree. Con un marcador de cualquier color que te guste, puedes escribir cortos mensajes en cada uno y después decorar el carro, oficina o puerta para tu amado.

Aquí hay unas frases que puedes escribir. (¡También sirve como lección de español si quieres hacer la manualidad con los niños!)

Te Quiero
Te Quiero Mucho
TQM
Te Amo
Te Adoro
Nene/Nena
Corazón
Corazón de Melon
Guapo/Guapa
Chulo/Chula
Bonito/Bonita
Amor
Amorcito Corazón
Cielito Lindo
Bésame
Besos
Abrazos
Se Mío
Papi Chulo/Mami Chula
Te Amo Un Chingo
Tú y Yo
Para Siempre

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Title: Doily Hearts for Valentine’s Day

Do you need a fast and affordable craft for Valentine’s Day? These paper doily hearts are only $1 for a pack of 30 at Dollar Tree. With a colored marker you can write short messages on each heart and then decorate the car, office, or door of your beloved.

Here are some phrases in Spanish you can write. (This also serves as a Spanish lesson if you do the craft with the kids!)

Te Quiero
Te Quiero Mucho
TQM
Te Amo
Te Adoro
Nene/Nena
Corazón
Corazón de Melon
Guapo/Guapa
Chulo/Chula
Bonito/Bonita
Amor
Amorcito Corazón
Cielito Lindo
Bésame
Besos
Abrazos
Se Mío
Papi Chulo/Mami Chula
Te Amo Un Chingo
Tú y Yo
Para Siempre

“Growing Up Pedro” and “20 Camiones Grandes” (giveaway!)

book-giveaway-pedro-3

Disclosure: I received copies of these books for review purposes. No other compensation was given. As always, all opinions are my own.

Veinte camiones grandes en medio de la calle” by Mark Lee and illustrated by Kurt Cyrus, is a Spanish-language board book aimed at children ages 2 to 5 years old, but I will admit something to you – as a non-native speaker, I learned a lot of new words in this book! I feel like the vocabulary is pretty advanced given the audience, but I see that as a positive thing as there are plenty of children’s books with much more basic language. (An example of a sentence that tripped me up: “El 17 arrastra un tambor de alquitrán.” Apparently “arrastrar” means to drag or haul, and “alquitrán” is tar.)

The book has a good rhythm and rhyming words which make it fun to read aloud, and kids who love vehicles will be completely enthralled by the illustrations of all the different types of cars and trucks caught up in a traffic jam.

As for “Growing up Pedro” by Matt Tavares – I really loved this book. I’m not a big baseball fan and honestly didn’t know who Pedro Martínez was, (now I do!) but this is a really beautifully written story about a Dominican-born baseball player who grows up admiring his brother Ramón. Both brothers end up making history in American major league baseball but it’s the touching glimpse into their personal lives behind their careers and the gorgeous illustrations that make this book so appealing. “Growing up Pedro” is aimed at children ages 8 to 12, but I can see children who are a little younger enjoying it as well, (although because of the length they may not be able to listen to it in one sitting.)

Want to win a copy of each of these books? Check out the giveaway below!

—GIVEAWAY CLOSED!—

GIVEAWAY DETAILS

Prize description: Two lucky winners will each receive a prize pack which includes a copy of GROWING UP PEDRO by Matt Tavares and a copy of 20 CAMIONES GRANDES EN MEDIO DE LA CALLE by Mark Lee, illustrated by Kurt Cyrus.

Approximate value: $25.00 per prize pack

How to Enter:

Just leave a comment below telling me your child’s favorite book right now! Alternately, you can tell me one of YOUR favorite children’s books. (Please read official rules below.)

Official Rules: No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years of age or older to enter. You must be able to provide a U.S. or Canada address for prize shipment. Your name and address will only be shared with the company in charge of prize fulfillment. Please no P.O. Boxes. One entry per household. Make sure that you enter a valid E-mail address in the E-mail address field so you can be contacted if you win. Winner will be selected at random. Winner has 24 hours to respond. After 24 hours, a new winner will be selected at random. Giveaway entries are being accepted between February 9th, 2015 through February 13th, 2015. Entries received after February 13th, 2015 at 11:59 pm ET, will not be considered. The number of eligible entries received determines the odds of winning. If you win, by accepting the prize, you are agreeing that Latinaish.com assumes no liability for damages of any kind. By entering your name below you are agreeing to these Official Rules. Void where prohibited by law.

Buena suerte! Good luck!