Category Archives: Language

16 años

Tracy, Carlos y nuestro hijo mayor - 1999, La Playa Libertad, El Salvador

Tracy, Carlos y nuestro hijo mayor – 1999, La Playa Libertad, El Salvador

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation in italics!

Este fin de semana, Carlos y yo celebramos nuestro decimosexto aniversario. A veces no sé como hemos llegado a este punto juntos con todas las complicaciones de nuestro matrimonio, pero estoy super agradecida.

This weekend, Carlos and I celebrate our sixteenth anniversary. Sometimes I don’t know how we’ve reached this point together with all the complications of our marriage, but I’m super grateful.

Carlos y Tracy - San Salvador, El Salvador 2011

Carlos y Tracy – 2011, San Salvador, El Salvador

Pon el huevo en el agua

huevo-agua

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Tenemos varias tradiciones por comenzar el año nuevo pero este año Carlos me presentó a una nueva. Después de hablar por telefono con su hermana, Carlos me dijo que quería enseñarme algo que algunas personas hacen en El Salvador. Sacó un huevo del refrigerador, llenó un vaso con agua, y los dejó en la mesa para que pudieran llegar a temperatura ambiente.

“¿Pero qué es eso?” le pregunté.
“Es una manera en que uno puede predecir que viene en el año nuevo. Después de romper el huevo en el agua, la parte blanca del huevo hace formas.”

Le pregunté a Carlos, “¿Cómo se llama esta tradición?”
“Espera”, me dijo y mandó un mensaje de texto a su hermana para preguntar.
Un minuto más tarde, su teléfono sonó.
“¿Qué dijo?” le pregunté. “¿Cómo se llama la tradición?”
“Simplemente se llama ‘Pon el huevo en el agua’”, respondió Carlos. (Lo cual me hizo reír por unos minutos).

Cuando estaban a temperatura ambiente, Carlos rompió el huevo en el agua.

cracking-huevo

Y esperamos.

Y esperamos.

egg-in-water

Hasta que por fin…

volcano-egg

Pienso que parece al volcán de San Salvador. Ojalá significa que vamos a visitarlo este año.

Image source: Wikipedia author, Xtremesv

Image source: Wikipedia author, Xtremesv

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

We have several traditions to start the new year but this year Carlos introduced me to a new one. After talking on the phone with his sister, Carlos told me he wanted to show me something that some people do in El Salvador. He took an egg from the fridge, filled a glass with water, and then left them on the table to come to room temperature.

“But what is that?” I asked.
“It’s a way to predict what will come in the new year. After breaking the egg into the water, the white of the egg makes shapes.”

“What is the tradition called?” I asked.
“Hold on,” he said and sent a text message to his sister to ask.
A minute later, his phone rang.
“What did she say?” I asked. “What’s the tradition called?”
“It’s just called ‘Put the egg in the water,’” Carlos said, (Which made ​​me laugh for a few minutes.)

When they were at room temperature, Carlos broke the egg into the water.

Then we waited.

And waited.

Until finally…

I think it looks like the San Salvador volcano. Hopefully this means we’ll visit this year.

Arroz con Leche

arroz con leche - latinaish.com

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

A pesar de nuestras diferentes crianzas, Carlos y yo tenemos algunas cosas sorprendentes en común – arroz con leche (o “rice pudding” en inglés) es uno de ellos. Al crecer casi nunca comimos arroz en mi casa para cenar, pero de vez en cuando mi madre calentaba arroz blanco en un recipiente con leche, luego añadió la canela y el azúcar para un deleite especial. Esta es una receta antigua de mi familia, pero es algo que Carlos comió en su casa en El Salvador, también.

Arroz con Leche

1 taza de arroz cocido
3/4 taza de leche (1%)
2 1/2 cucharaditas de azúcar
canela molida
una pizca de sal

En una olla mediana, combine el arroz y la leche. Revuelva hasta que esté caliente. Agregue la sal y el azúcar. Retire del fuego. Sazone con canela al gusto y servir. Rinde 2 porciones.

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Despite our different upbringings, Carlos and I have some surprising things in common – rice pudding (arroz con leche) is one of them. Growing up we almost never ate rice at my house for dinner, but occasionally my mother warmed white rice in a bowl with milk, then added cinnamon and sugar for a special treat. This is an old recipe from my family, but it’s something that Carlos ate at his home in El Salvador, too.

Arroz con Leche

(Rice Pudding)

1 cup cooked rice
3/4 cup milk (1%)
2 1/2 teaspoons sugar
ground cinnamon
a pinch of salt

In a medium pot, combine rice and milk. Stir until warm. Add salt and sugar. Remove from heat. Season with a sprinkling of cinnamon and serve. Makes 2 servings.

arroz con leche - latinaish.com

Palabras que no me gustan

pantoufles

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation in italics!

Soy una amante de los idiomas. Puedo hablar con mucho cariño sobre las palabras que me encantan tanto en inglés como en español… Pero, igual que tengo palabras favoritas, tengo palabras que me molestan (a veces sin ninguna buena razón) – Aquí hay unas de ellas:

I’m a language lover. I can talk with a lot of affection for the words I love in both English and Spanish… But, just as I have favorite words, I have words that annoy me (sometimes without good reason) – Here are a few of them:

Pantuflas – Slippers
Jaiba – Crab
Mondongo – Tripe
Pompis – Butt
Barbaridad – Barbarity

¿Qué palabras no te gustan en español o inglés?

What words do you dislike in English or Spanish?

¡Viva la Nieve!

worx-snowthrower-assembly1

Disclosure: This is not a paid or sponsored post. A WORX 13-Amp 18-in Electric Snow Blower was provided for review purposes. No other compensation was or will be received. All opinions are my own.

The day after we had already shoveled out of our first snow of the season, the new snow blower arrived at our door, (Carlos didn’t find that as amusing as I did.) Nevertheless, he got to work assembling the snow blower right away to prepare for the storm forecast for the next day.

worx-snowthrower-directions-spanish

The assembly instructions that come with it are in both English and Spanish. In our experience, Spanish instructions often aren’t as good as the English, but these seemed to be equally accurate and included the same illustrations for each. That being said, despite Spanish being his first language, Carlos used the English version as he almost always does to assemble things. My theory as to why he does this? He learned vocabulary for tools, hardware and the verbs associated with those words in English through various labor jobs he’s had over the years in the United States, not in Spanish while growing up in El Salvador. Interesting, isn’t it? Are there any situations in which you prefer to use your second language rather than your native language?

It took no more than 30 minutes for Carlos to put the snow blower together and then we waited for the flakes to fall. We didn’t have to wait long as several inches of heavy, wet snow piled up the next day.

The snow blower instructions encourage you to set it outside for a few minutes so it can adjust to the temperature, so once the snow stopped, we did that and later brought it out to our driveway where we plugged the extension cord into it. (We purchased a blue-colored outdoor extension cord especially designed for cold weather at Lowe’s.)

Carlos used it first before showing me how. I liked how easy it was to start. You push the button and squeeze the handles to start it. To stop it, you just let the handles go, (which is an excellent safety feature in case you slip on the icy pavement.)

worx-snowthrower-handle

I found the snow thrower to be really lightweight and easy to handle. We were impressed with how far it threw the snow and how simple it was to turn the little crank and change the direction in which it throws the snow. As far as noise level – it wasn’t whisper quiet, but it wasn’t louder than expected either. You can see and hear it in action for yourself in the video below.

As for the actual job it did of clearing the snow – we were satisfied given the fact that our driveway is over a decade old and has never been properly sealed or re-paved. In other words, the texture of our driveway is really rough, so it’s difficult to get it perfectly clean regardless of what we use.

worx-snowthrower-clear-path-1

We used a snow shovel in one section to compare and the shovel didn’t do any better than the snow blower, at least with this particular type and amount of snow.

shovel-snow

A week later it snowed again, another few inches of the same type of snow, and the snow blower worked again without any problems whatsoever. While we didn’t feel the snow blower sped up the process of removing the snow, and may actually have taken a little longer than a shovel due to setting it up, the benefit of not waking up the next morning with back pain made it worth it. Using the snow blower also means we have energy left after we clear our own driveway and so we’re better able to help our elderly neighbors. (Which is not a totally unselfish act. Sometimes they give us cookies to thank us. I find cookies motivating.)

Interested in learning more? Check out information and reviews of this snow blower at Lowes.com, or on the the WORX website. You can follow WORX tools on social media, including Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

Desafío aceptado: Tamales Salvadoreños

Image source: Flickr user Doran

Image source: Flickr user Doran

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation in italics!

La primera vez que comí un tamal salvadoreño de gallina, te digo la verdad, no me gustó. Si uno está acostombrado a los tamales mexicanos, los tamales salvadoreños se sienten muy ligosos y mojados en comparación. Con masa que tiene una textura que me recuerda a gelatina, y un olor único gracias a las hojas de plátano en que están doblados, nunca me enamoré de los tamales salvadoreños y entonces, tampoco traté de hacerlos… hasta ahora.

No sé por qué pero por unas semanas he tenido un antojo por los tamales salvadoreños de gallina que hace mi suegra, llenos de pollo, papas, y garbanzos. Ya que mi suegra no está aquí con nosotros, tengo que tratar de hacerlos solita. Entre las memorias de Carlos y yo, más unas recetas para guiarnos, vamos a hacer tamales este fin de semana. ¡Deséenos suerte!

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Challenge Accepted: Salvadoran Tamales

The first time I ate a Salvadoran chicken tamal, I’ll tell you the truth, I didn’t like it. If one is accustomed to Mexican tamales, the Salvadoran tamales feel slimy and wet in comparison. With a texture that reminds me of Jell-O, and a unique smell thanks to the plantain leaves they’re folded into, I never fell in love with Salvadoran tamales, and so I never tried to make them… until now.

I don’t know why but for the past few weeks I’ve had a craving for the Salvadoran chicken tamales my mother-in-law used to make, full of chicken, potato and garbanzo beans. Since my mother-in-law isn’t here with us, I have to try to make them myself. Between Carlos and my memories, plus some recipes to guide us, we will try to make tamales this weekend. Wish us luck!

10 Vídeos Favoritos – Diciembre 2013

10vids

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation in italics!

Estos son mis vídeos favoritos en español en este momento. La mayoría son “Vines” y por eso son bien cortitos. Chécalos! // Here are my favorite videos in Spanish at the moment. Most of the videos are “Vines” – that’s why they’re so short. Check them out!

1.

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8.

9.

10.

T.V. en Spanglish

inglesespanol

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Carlos estaba mirando la televisión y yo estaba escribiendo, cuando escuché este anuncio bilingüe. Yo grabé el anuncio para que todos ustedes pudieran verlo también. ¿Tal vez algún día todos los anuncios en los Estados Unidos serán bilingües?

¿Qué opinas tú? ¿Te gusta ver los anuncios de televisión bilingües más que los anuncios monolingües?

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Carlos was watching television and I was writing, when I overheard this bilingual commercial. I videotaped the commercial so all of you can see, too. Maybe some day all commercials in the United States will be bilingual?

What do you think? Do you like to watch bilingual television advertisements more than monolingual advertisements?

All You – Celebraciones!

AYCover1213_HispanicBooklet_lr[1]

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

¿Has visto esta revista en tu tienda WalMart? En esta edición de diciembre 2013, “All You” empezó a publicar un folleto dentro de la revista que se llama “All You Celebraciones” que oferece contenido especialmente para latinas en inglés. Tengo el honor de ser incluida en la primera edición de “Celebraciones” con otras blogueras latinas, compartiendo como celebramos y mantenemos nuestras tradiciones vivas. Chécalo!

celebraciones_allyou

allyou_december2013

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Have you seen this magazine at your WalMart store? In this December 2013 issue, “All You” began publishing an insert within the magazine called “All You Celebraciones” which offers content especially for Latinas in English. I have the honor of being included in the first issue of “Celebraciones” with other Latina bloggers, sharing how we celebrate and keep our traditions alive. Check it out!

El Mejor Chocolate del Mundo

chuao

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Muchos de ustedes saben que he estado muy ocupada creando una “guía de regalos” para ustedes, pero hoy quiero darles un vistazo a uno de mis regalos favoritos que estará en la guía.

Chuao Chocolatier está basado en San Diego por el venezolano Chef Michael, y los chocolates que él crea son fuera de este mundo. He sido un fan de la variedad que se llama “Spicy Maya” entre otros por muchos años, pero hoy probé otras variedades y no estoy exagerando cuando digo que es el mejor chocolate que he comido.

Las combinaciones de sabores creativos y la calidad del chocolate no se puede comparar con cualquier otro que he probado. Sabores que uno puede creer ser demasiado extraños, en realidad son deliciosos, (por ejemplo, la barra de “Maple bacon” o la barra de “Pop Corn Pop”.)

Los animo a encontrar un distribuidor cerca de ustedes o ustedes pueden ordenarlos en internet – para ustedes mismos, o para algún miembro de la familia que ama el chocolate. Echa un vistazo a todas las variedades y déjeme saber cuál es su favorito!

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Many of you know I’ve been busy creating a “gift guide” for you guys, but today I want to give you a sneak peek at one of my favorite gifts that will be in the guide.

Chuao Chocolatier is based in San Diego by Venezuelan Chef Michael, and the chocolates he creates are out of this world amazing. I’ve been a fan of the “Spicy Maya” variety, among others, for a number of years, but today I tasted other varieties and I’m not exaggerating when I tell you, it’s the best chocolate I’ve ever eaten.

The creative flavor combinations and the quality of the chocolate cannot be compared to anything else I’ve tried. Flavors you think might be too strange are in fact delicious, (for example, the “Maple Bacon” bar or the “Pop Corn Pop” bar.)

I encourage you to find a retailer near you or you can order online – for yourself, or for a family member who loves chocolate. Check out all the varieties and let me know which one you most want to try!

Disclosure: This is not a paid or sponsored post. A sample of Chuao chocolate was received for review purposes. All opinions are my own.

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