Similitudes Inesperadas

carlos-tracy-kinder

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Cuando uno se casa con alguien que nacio en otro país hay un millón de cosas que no tienen en común, pero descubriendo las similitudes inesperadas es muy divertido. Aquí hay 10 cosas Carlos y yo tuvimos en común aunque él nació y se crió en El Salvador y mi niñez fue aquí en los Estados Unidos.

Similitudes Inesperadas Entre Carlos y Yo

1. Ambos intentamos (sin éxito) aprender a tocar la guitarra.

2. Nosotros dos tenemos una hermana mayor que es mayor por varios años.

3. Ambos tuvimos un perro mascota.

4. Ambos tenemos las letras “CAR” en nuestro nombre: CARlos e invertido en mi nombre: TRACy.

5. Nuestros padres jugaron fútbol. (Mi padre jugó en la universidad. El padre de Carlos jugó y más tarde fue el director de un equipo.)

6. Garbage Pail Kids. Nos gustaban mucho las tarjetas, pero sólo pudimos admirar las tarjetas de nuestros amigos. Carlos no podía comprarlas por falta de dinero y yo no podía comprarlas porque mi mamá dijo que eran asquerosas. (Pero tal vez yo tenía algunas escondidas en mi escritorio en la escuela.)

7. Champú Prell. Sentí nostalgia un día y compré champú Prell – un producto que era a menudo en mi ducha cuando yo era niña. Cuando Carlos lo olió, lo reconoció inmediatamente como el champú también había utilizado a menudo cuando era niño.

8. Arroz con Leche.

9. Nos gustaba mucho los ThunderCats, Knight Rider, Los Picapiedras, Scooby Doo, Looney Tunes, y varios otros programas de televisión.

10. Cada domingo pasabamos la mañana en la iglesia. Imagínese, yo en mi vestido y zapatos oxford, él en su trajecito. Aunque estuvimos sentados en bancos de madera a miles de kilómetros de distancia, estabamos destinados a encontrarnos un día.

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

When one marries with someone from another country there are a million things they won’t have in common, but discovering the unexpected similarities is really fun. Here are 10 things Carlos and I had in common even though he was born and raised in El Salvador and my childhood was here in the United States.

Unexpected Similarities Between Carlos and Myself

1. We both tried (unsuccessfully) to try to learn to play the guitar at one point or another.

2. We both have an older sister who is older by several years.

3. We both had a pet dog.

4. We both have the letters “CAR” in our names: CARlos and reversed in my name: TRACy.

5. Our fathers both played soccer. (My dad played in college. Carlos’s father played and was later the manager of a team.)

6. Garbage Pail Kids. We both loved the cards but could only admire the cards of our friends. Carlos couldn’t afford them and I wasn’t allowed to have them because my mom said they were disgusting. (I may or may not have had a few hidden in my desk at school though.)

7. Prell shampoo. I felt nostalgic one day and bought some Prell shampoo – a product that was often in my shower growing up. When Carlos smelled it, he recognized it immediately as the shampoo he had also often used as a child.

8. Arroz con Leche.

9. We both loved ThunderCats, Knight Rider, The Flintstones, Scooby Doo, Looney Tunes, and several other TV shows.

10. We spent each Sunday morning in church. Imagine, me in my dress and saddle shoes, him in his little suit. Seated on wooden pews thousands of miles away, but destined to meet one day.

Real Amas de Casa de Soyapango (y otros programas que quiero ver)

Image adapted from photo by Christian Dory/Wikipedia

Image adapted from photo by Christian Dory/Wikipedia

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Cuando compartí en Facebook la noticia de que va a salir un programa que se llama “Acapulco Shore” (basado en el famoso programa “Jersey Shore”), un amigo mío que se llama Jaime me dijo, sería mejor si hicieran un programa “Real Amas de Casa de Soyapango” (basado en el programa “Real Housewives of Orange County.”)

No soy fan de muchos programas de televisión, pero si tuvieran un “toque” salvadoreño, yo estaría mucho más interesada en verlos, entonces, se me occurió la idea de hacer esta lista.

Programas Populares (si los hubieran realizado en El Salvador)

En vez de Real Housewives of Orange County – Real Amas de Casa de Soyapango
En vez de Jersey Shore – La Libertad Shore
En vez de Law & Order: SVU – Ley & Orden: PNC
En vez de Iron Chef – La Mejor Pupusera
En vez de American Idol – Idol Salvadoreño (con jueces Álvaro Torres, Mr. Pelón 503 y Allison Iraheta)
En vez de America’s Got Talent – El Salvador Tiene Talento (con jueces Cocolito, La Tenchis, y Cipitío)
En vez de Keeping Up with the Kardashians – Mantenerse al Tanto con Los Pomas
En vez de Deadliest Catch – Los Pescadores Futbolistas
En vez de 19 Kids and Counting – 19 Primos y Contando
En vez de Pawn Stars – Mercado Central
En vez de Pit Bulls and Parolees – Chuchos Aguacateros y Mareros
En vez de Mad Money – Locas Remesas
En vez de America’s Secret Slang – Caliche
En vez de What Would You Do? – ¿Qué Harías Vos?
En vez de Ice Road Truckers – Microbúseros

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

When I shared on Facebook that a T.V. show called “Acapulco Shore” (based on the famous “Jersey Shore”) would be coming out, a friend of mine named Jaime commented that it would be better if they made a show called “Real Amas de Casa de Soyapango” (based on the show “Real Housewives of Orange County.”)

I’m not a fan of many T.V. shows but if they had a Salvadoran “twist”, I would be much more interested in watching them, so it occurred to me to make this list.

Popular T.V. programs (if they had been made in El Salvador)

Instead of Real Housewives of Orange County – Real Amas de Casa de Soyapango
Instead of Jersey Shore – La Libertad Shore
Instead of Law & Order: SVU – Ley & Orden: PNC
Instead of Iron Chef – La Mejor Pupusera
Instead of American Idol – Idol Salvadoreño (with judges Álvaro Torres, Mr. Pelón 503 y Allison Iraheta)
Instead of America’s Got Talent – El Salvador Tiene Talento (with judges Cocolito, La Tenchis, y Cipitío)
Instead of Keeping Up with the Kardashians – Mantenerse al Tanto con Los Pomas
Instead of Deadliest Catch – Los Pescadores Futbolistas
Instead of 19 Kids and Counting – 19 Primos y Contando
Instead of Pawn Stars – Mercado Central
Instead of Pit Bulls and Parolees – Chuchos Aguacateros y Mareros
Instead of Mad Money – Locas Remesas
Instead of America’s Secret Slang – Caliche
Instead of What Would You Do? – ¿Qué Harías Vos?
Instead of Ice Road Truckers – Microbúseros

La Vida Puede Ser Simple

Monica-Giraldo

Disclosure: Latinaish.com has partnered with Cricket Wireless as a 2014 Blog Ambassador. All opinions are my own.

Perhaps it’s a normal progression, but I find that as I’m getting older the “get the party started” type of songs just sound… loud. There are still days when that’s the sort of mood I’m in and those songs are appropriate, but more and more often I’m seeking quiet yet happy songs, and when I find an entire album that is suitably quiet yet happy, I get really excited.

On the unlimited music service called Muve Music, which I have with my Cricket Wireless plan, I’ve been fortunate to find some new music I may never otherwise have discovered, which includes my new favorite quiet yet happy album at the moment by a Colombian singer named Mónica Giraldo. If I had to describe her music, the vocal qualities are a mix of Shakira and Sarah McLaughlin, while the sound reminds me very much of quieter songs by Brazilian group Kid Abelha. Sound perfect? Check out Mónica Giraldo’s album, Todo Da Vueltas on Muve Music. Here’s my favorite song on the album, “La Vida Puede Ser Simple.” I really love the lyrics.

If you love it, you can check out her other albums on her website, including her newest, Que Venga la Vida.

For more from Cricket Wireless ambassadors, follow the #VidaConCricket hashtag and @MiCricket on Twitter. Note: If you are not currently a Cricket Wireless customer and wish to sign up with Cricket, due to the AT&T buyout Muve Music may not come with your device. You can read more about that here. When I have more information about what music options new Cricket customers will have, I’ll be sure to let you all know!

Recycled Soda Can Luminary

can-lantern-finished-project

As a member of Lowe’s Creative Ideas Network I received gift cards from Lowe’s in order to purchase supplies to complete projects. All opinions are my own.

September is a beautiful time of year to be outside at all hours. If you have a nice patio, it’s the perfect season to have an evening dinner party with friends or familia – but what’s a patio dinner party without a little mood lighting? Luminaries hung on a string or from trees can be so pretty. Here’s a method for making little lanterns out of recycled soda cans.

Do-it-Yourself Recycled Soda Can Luminary

What you need:

empty soda cans
x-acto knife
paper towels
screwdriver
string or wire
tealights (I highly recommend battery-operated tealights to ensure there’s no fire hazard)

Note: I do not consider this a safe craft for kids. The x-acto knife is obviously sharp but so is the soda can once it’s cut. Please be very careful.

Directions:

can-project-cans

1. Fill empty soda cans a little more than 3/4 of the way with water. Place in the freezer for a few hours, until water inside has frozen. Do not leave any longer than necessary as the water will expand and the can will bust and become unusable.

can-project-fill-w-water

2. Take the can out of the freezer and place on top of a few paper towels. Being extremely careful, use the x-acto knife to cut slits in the can as shown. The lines must be elongated ‘S’ shapes. Do not cut straight lines or it won’t turn out right. The more slits you make, the more intricate the design will be. You need at least 8.

can-project-S-shape-cuts

3. Use warm water to melt the ice inside the soda can, (or allow to melt in the sink.) Gently shake dry.

4. Insert the screwdriver into the inside of the can and use it to push the strips outward. Gently push down on the top of the can to help push them out. Take your time and work at the strips until they’re rounded and look nice.

can-project-push-down

can-project-round-it-out

can-project-top-view

5. Pull the tab of the soda can up, being careful not to snap it off. Tie a string or bit of wire to it as a hanger or run a length of string through several lanterns to hang.

6. Being careful not to cut your fingers, insert a tealight inside. (Battery operated highly recommended.)

can-project-with-battery-light

soda-can-lantern

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Tienes un hijo salvadoreño si…

abuela-cookies-pupusas

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Hay muchas señales que uno está criando un hijo salvadoreño en los Estados Unidos, (aquí hay 15!) pero el fin de semana pasado, mi hijo menor me hizo reír mucho con un comentario que reveló cómo muy salvadoreño que es.

Mi hijo mayor trabaja en un museo para niños y él trajo a casa un papel con actividades para niños por su hermanito, (aunque su hermanito ya es demasiado mayor para este tipo de actividades.) En el papel hay fáciles crucigramas y cosas así. En una parte del papel hay un dibujo de una abuela con un plato de galletas, y el niño debe completar un laberinto para que la abuela puede traer las galletas a sus nietos, (o algo así.)

Sin leerlo, mi hijo menor me mostró el dibujo y me dijo, “Mira, qué gran plato de pupusas tiene la abuela.”

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

There are a lot of signs that you’re raising a Salvadoran child in the United States, (here are 15!) but this past weekend, my younger son made me laugh a lot with a comment he made which revealed how very Salvadoran he is.

My older son works at a children’s museum and he brought home an activity sheet for kids to give to his little brother, (even though his little brother is already too old for these types of activities.) On the activity sheet there are easy crossword puzzles and things like that. On one part of the paper, there’s a drawing of a grandmother holding a plate of cookies, and the child is supposed to complete a maze so the grandmother can bring the cookies to her grandchildren, (or something like that.)

Without reading it, my younger son showed me the drawing and said, “Look, what a big plate of pupusas the grandmother has.”

Recipe: Batido de Leche con Guineo (Banana Smoothie) + Giveaway!

Batido de Guineo

This post is sponsored by Nestlé Nido. Product for review and recipe development have been received as well as compensation for my time. As always, all opinions are my own.

Carlos doesn’t cook much at all, but the thing he feels most comfortable making is his Batido de Leche con Guineo. Over the years he has made banana smoothies for himself and our boys many times, so much so that when the boys want one, they ask him instead of me. While he makes them year round, he tends to make the batidos during the summer as a refreshing treat. Our family depends on simple everyday things like that because most years we can’t afford to travel or vacation like we want to. Summer memories for my sons are things like lying in the hammock and watching puffy, white clouds sail by; running barefoot through cool grass in our yard to catch lightening bugs, and sipping batidos de guineo that their father made for them.

So, when given the opportunity to develop a recipe with the Nestlé Nido Kinder 1+ (a vitamin-fortified powdered milk), I knew immediately I’d be using Carlos’s smoothie recipe and changing it up a little. What I love about Nestlé Nido is that it adds over a dozen vitamins and minerals, but it also adds a really good flavor.

(Even our dog Chico wants a sip.)

(Even our dog Chico wants a sip.)

(On a hilarious side note, Carlos eats the powder straight. He says one of his cousins in El Salvador used to have a powder like this in their kitchen growing up and he used to steal spoonfuls of it as a kid and eat it. I tasted it straight to see if he was being crazy and strangely enough, it really is good like that.)

Anyhow, when the boys saw me experimenting with the Nestlé Nido in the kitchen they were reluctant to try what I was making because it’s “baby formula for babies” according to them, but they ended up loving it and begging me to make more. Smoothies made with Nestlé Nido are perfect for back-to-school, either for breakfast when your child claims they “aren’t that hungry” or for an after school snack before they get down to doing homework.

nestle-nido-batido

Try the recipe below and then enter the giveaway to win your own Nestlé Nido products plus a $50 gift card!

Batido de Leche con Guineo (Banana Smoothie)

You need:
8 oz. cold water
4 scoops Nestlé Nido Kinder 1+
1 ripe banana
1 teaspoon Mexican vanilla extract
4 ice cubes

Directions: Place all ingredients in the blender. Blend for 30 seconds to one minute. Pour into glasses and serve. Serves about 2. (Optional: You can add sugar, which is what Carlos does, but the boys and I prefer it without added sugar.)

========GIVEAWAY CLOSED=======

Congratulations, Cerrie!

=============================

GIVEAWAY DETAILS

Prize description: One lucky winner will receive 4 trial size cans of Nestlé Nido Kinder 1+ and a $50 gift card.

How to enter: Just leave a comment below telling me the flavor of your favorite smoothie/batido. (Please read official rules below before entering.)

Official Rules: No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years of age or older to enter. You must be able to provide a U.S. address for prize shipment. Your name and address will only be shared with the PR agency responsible for prize fulfillment for that purpose. Please no P.O. Boxes. One entry per household. Make sure that you enter a valid email address in the email address field so you can be contacted if you win. Winner will be selected at random. Winner has 24 hours to respond. If winner does not respond within 24 hours, a new winner will be selected at random. Giveaway entries are being accepted between August 26th, 2014 through August 31st, 2014. Entries received after August 31st, 2014 at 11:59 pm EST, will not be considered. The number of eligible entries received determines the odds of winning. If you win, by accepting the prize, you are agreeing that Latinaish.com assumes no liability for damages of any kind. By entering your name below you are agreeing to these Official Rules. Void where prohibited by law.

Buena suerte / Good luck!

Sopa de Pollo Salvadoreña

Sopa de Pollo Salvadoreña

Carlos has been sick for a week, and on Friday he was so sick that he even took off work. I’ve been doing every home remedy I know of to make him better – Vicks Vaporub on the feet before bed, honey lemon tea, vaporizers, vitamin C, and just plain old bed rest, but nothing seemed to help very much. (I did all these remedios caseros on myself too for prevention and so far, so good.)

On Saturday Carlos asked me to make him Sopa de Pollo, but he didn’t want the Bolivian Chicken Soup recipe I always use. He asked if I’d try to make Salvadoran Chicken Soup “with lots of vegetables” this time. Obviously he was needing a little extra apapachamiento! Of course I always love making a new Salvadoran dish and seeing the way his eyes light up when it’s a success, so I did some research, looked at a handful of recipes, and then headed to the grocery store to get what I needed.

Before the soup was even ready, Carlos was getting excited. He kept calling out to me from the living room where he was on the sofa covered in a blanket, “It smells so good. It smells like I remember…” Then when it was ready, I put the bowl before him at the table and he smiled, “It looks like how I remember!” … Then he tasted it, and I’m not exaggerating, he stood up, kissed me (on the neck so I wouldn’t get his germs) and told me he loved me. Jajaja.

Here’s my recipe in case you know a sick salvadoreño or salvadoreña who could use a little “TLC”, (Cuidado amoroso y tierno.)

Sopa de Pollo Salvadoreño

You need:

10 chicken thighs (boneless, skinless)
2 medium tomatoes, quartered
3 corn cobs, broken in half
1/2 1 small cabbage, cut in chunks
cilantro
basil, (fresh, not dry)
2 to 3 celery stalks with leaves
2 cups baby carrots, (or cut up carrots)
3 green onions, (roots cut off)
2 tablespoons minced garlic
2 small potatoes, cut into bite-size chunks
1 small zucchini, skin removed and chopped in bite-size pieces
1/2 cup uncooked rice or small pasta like “conchitas” (little shells)
1 tsp. salt, plus to taste
1/4 tsp. black pepper
1/2 tsp. cumin
1 tsp. achiote (ground annatto)

Directions:

1. Assemble and prepare all your ingredients, (wash and chop vegetables, etc.)

Note: I used all boneless, skinless chicken thighs because Carlos prefers dark meat and it gives the stock a better flavor, but you can use a whole chicken cut in pieces (remove skin – bones optional as some people like to “chupar el hueso”), or substitute some chicken breasts. As for the vegetables, feel free to experiment. For example, some people use yucca instead of potatoes, and some add chayote/güisquil, broccoli, cauliflower, and/or green pepper.

2. In a large stock pot over medium high heat, add the chicken plus enough water to cover by about 2 inches.

3. Add to the pot: a handful of cilantro, a handful of basil, celery stalks with leaves, garlic, tomatoes, green onions, 1 tsp. salt, cumin, pepper, and achiote.

4. Simmer for 20 minutes or until chicken is completely cooked. Use a slotted spoon to remove and then discard the cilantro, basil, celery, tomatoes and green onions. Use a small sieve to skim off any foam.

5. Add the rice (or pasta), corn cobs, potatoes, and carrots. Cook covered until rice is cooked and vegetables are tender.

6. Remove cover. Add cabbage and zucchini. Simmer for a minute or two and then remove from heat. Allow to cool slightly and then taste. Add additional salt as desired. (I prefer to let each person add more salt to their own individual portion.)

7. Ladle into bowls and top with cilantro if desired. (I like to eat all the meat and vegetables out of it and then eat the broth with crushed Ritz crackers.)

Buen provecho!