A Trip to: Colombia

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Editor’s note: Welcome to the Hispanic Heritage Month “A Trip to” series here on Latinaish. Join us as we virtually visit different Latin American countries through the photos and words of people who live there, have lived there, or have visited and have a lot of love for that particular place. Today Diana of Speaking Latino shows us around Colombia!

Bogota is the capital city of Colombia where cachacos, the name given to the people from Bogota, are extremely kind and love both salsa and their traditional music. Bogota is at 8,612 ft. above sea level and, for those that aren’t used to those heights, that will make you literally “feel” the city.

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The historical center of Bogota is located in La Candelaria. Among the government buildings and plazas you will find a busy Plaza de Bolivar where on one side the Palacio Liévano or Lievano Palace is located. This is the seat of the mayor of Bogota. Passing by the Plaza de Bolivar is the Carrera 7, a busy street that has undergone the process of becoming a pedestrian walkway in some segments.

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One of the obligatory stops while in Bogota is the Gold Museum or Museo del Oro that is located in the historical center of the city. It displays a pre-Hispanic collection of gold artifacts made by the indigenous cultures in Colombia before the colonization period.

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Monserrate is a mountain that has become a symbol of Bogota. After a short funicular or cable car ride you will get to the top which is at 10,341 ft. above sea level. While there you will be able to eat at one of the restaurants or kiosks and visit the church.

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An amazing view of Bogota can be seen from Monserrate. There you will notice how big the city is. In fact, it is the largest city in Colombia and one of the most populated in Latin America.

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The T Zone or Zona T is a pedestrian intersection in the form of a T located in the Zona Rosa. In this area are dining options, fashion designer stores, and malls. It is a lively place to hang out.

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One of the most impressive things that I’ve seen in my life is the Salt Cathedral or Catedral de Sal constructed inside of an active salt mine in Zipaquirá. It includes all the elements to be labeled as a Catholic cathedral with regular religious activities and a mass celebrated every Sunday. They have enhanced the experience with color changing LED lights and even a retail area where you can find Colombian crafts. The Salt Cathedral is about a one-hour drive from Bogota and, even if you are not Catholic, it’s worth the visit.

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Bandeja paisa is perhaps one the most emblematic dishes of Colombia, especially popular in the Paisa region. The traditional bandeja paisa is a generous plate (or literally a tray) that includes all of the following: beans, rice, ground meat, chicharrón (fried pork belly), chorizo (sausage), avocado, sweet plantain and a fried egg on top.

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A hot alcoholic drink called canelazo is traditional in the Andean highlands and can be found also in Peru and Ecuador. The Colombian version consists of aguardiente (alcohol from sugarcane), panela (unrefined whole cane sugar) or sugar, and water boiled with cinnamon.

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Editor’s note: Did you enjoy this guest post? If you have some nice photos of a Latin American country you’d like to share as we did here with some short descriptions, please email me to be a part of this special travel series!