Hispanic Heritage Month 2015 Photo Challenge: Day #6

I’ll be participating in the “15 Days of Hispanic Heritage” photo challenge over on Instagram hosted by ¿Qué Means What? and The Nueva Latina. If you want to participate, just use the hashtag #HHM15Foto and take a photo for the given theme on each day! Here’s my photo and caption from Instagram for Day #6: Colores / Colors

hhm-day-6-colores

#HHM15FOTO challenge day 6, theme: #colores / colors… This is a bag from El Salvador my friend Claudia gave me. The bright colors remind me of the #colorful hammocks that are woven there, too. #HispanicHeritageMonth

Hispanic Heritage Month 2015 Photo Challenge: Day #5

I’ll be participating in the “15 Days of Hispanic Heritage” photo challenge over on Instagram hosted by ¿Qué Means What? and The Nueva Latina. If you want to participate, just use the hashtag #HHM15Foto and take a photo for the given theme on each day! Here’s my photo and caption from Instagram for Day #5: Celebración / Celebration

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#HHM15FOTO challenge day 5 – theme: celebración / celebration… This photo is from a year or two ago. Carlos and Chico both have December birthdays, but Chico wasn’t allowed to have any chocolate cake since it’s not safe for dogs. #HispanicHeritageMonth

Hispanic Heritage Month 2015 Photo Challenge: Day #4

I’ll be participating in the “15 Days of Hispanic Heritage” photo challenge over on Instagram hosted by ¿Qué Means What? and The Nueva Latina. If you want to participate, just use the hashtag #HHM15Foto and take a photo for the given theme on each day! Here’s my photo and caption from Instagram for Day #4: Hogar/Home

hhm-day-4-latinaish

#HHM15FOTO challenge day #4: Hogar/Home … The first time I went to El Salvador, I admired this wall hanging in Carlos’s childhood home. My suegra insisted I take it, so for many years it has hung near our front door. “Dios bendiga este hogar” means “God bless this home.” To be honest, I’m not really religious and at times the words seem a little ironic since life isn’t perfect, (like the fact that my suegra no longer speaks to me and moved out of our home on bad terms), but most days I just try to be thankful for the blessings we do have, even if it’s as basic to human survival as a roof over our heads and clean water to drink, because some in this world, in my own city even, don’t have even that.

Hispanic Heritage Month 2015 Photo Challenge: Day #3

I’ll be participating in the “15 Days of Hispanic Heritage” photo challenge over on Instagram hosted by ¿Qué Means What? and The Nueva Latina. If you want to participate, just use the hashtag #HHM15Foto and take a photo for the given theme on each day! Here’s my photo and caption from Instagram for Day #3: Amigos/Friends

hhm-day-3-latinaish

Day #3 of the #HHM15FOTO challenge. Today’s theme: #amigos /friends … This one is bittersweet. My friends are flung across the world – the ones in Georgia and Tennessee feel just as far as the ones in Mexico and El Salvador. I rarely get to see any of them face-to-face. I’m shy, so you’d think I’d be OK with that, but there are times I wish I could just meet up for a cafecito, bring an amiga sopa de pollo when she’s sick, play with her kids when she’s exhausted, be able to exchange abrazos as needed, and invite everyone I love to our house for Nochebuena, but I can’t. Even so, I am blessed and lucky to have the friends I do because they’re all amazing. This photo is from when my friend Sue and her husband Toño visited DC from Mexico. We had a lot of fun and I was thrilled that Carlos and Toño also hit it off so well. They’re one of my very favorite couples, full of love and great conversation. Les extraño @unalunadoslunas

Hispanic Heritage Month 2015 Photo Challenge: Day #2

I’ll be participating in the “15 Days of Hispanic Heritage” photo challenge over on Instagram hosted by ¿Qué Means What? and The Nueva Latina. If you want to participate, just use the hashtag #HHM15Foto and take a photo for the given theme on each day! Here’s my photo and caption from Instagram for Day #2: Bebida/Drink

hhm-day-2-latinaish

This is #Salvadoran #horchata de morro, which is different from the more commonly known Mexican horchata made from rice. If you’ve never tried it, please do so at your first opportunity. This one is from a local pupusería, but I always have horchata mix on hand from the mercado Latino to make it myself at home too. I’ve often said if there existed a Salvadoran horchata perfume, I would wear it. The powder mix smells like heaven. The ingredients are morro seed, rice, cocoa, cinnamon, peanut, sesame seed, vanilla, milk, and sugar. #HispanicHeritageMonth #salvadoreños

Hispanic Heritage Month 2015 Photo Challenge: Day #1

hhm15foto

Happy Hispanic Heritage Month! And Happy Independence Day to Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua today, as well as an early feliz día de independencia to Mexico and Chile.

I’ll be participating in the “15 Days of Hispanic Heritage” photo challenge over on Instagram hosted by ¿Qué Means What? and The Nueva Latina. If you want to participate, just use the hashtag #HHM15Foto and take a photo for the given theme on each day! Here’s my photo and caption from Instagram for Day #1: Yo/Me

hhm-day-1-latinaish

It’s the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month, and the first day of the #HHM15FOTO challenge! Today’s challlenge is yo/me, so aquí estoy. I am not Latina by birth, but by corazón. I love my Salvadoran husband’s culture almost as much as I love him, and I love mis dos hijos who are orgullosamente 1/2 Salvadoran. I support #HispanicHeritageMonth because I don’t want my husband or my sons to ever forget their roots… (and also, I’m here for the free pupusas. #kiddingnotkidding)

Salvadoran Nuégados

nuegados

Disclosure: Latinaish.com has partnered with Nestlé to bring you recipes using Nestlé products. As always, all opinions are my own.

Known as “buñuelos” in much of Latin America, El Salvador calls these traditional Easter fritters “nuégados” and they’re almost always accompanied by a toasted corn drink called “chilate.” There are many different varieties of nuégados with the most popular one being nuégados de yuca, but a Salvadoran acquaintance recently introduced me to nuégados de guineo (banana nuégados), which are much easier to make. The banana imparts a very delicate taste to the fried donuts which makes them delicious on their own, but they’re even more amazing with homemade Salvadoran “miel” (syrup) drizzled over top.

Here’s my recipe, and then down below, enter for your chance to win a $50 gift card from Nestlé!

For additional recipes, visit ElMejorNido.com.

nuegados con chilate

Salvadoran Banana Fritters / Nuégados Salvadoreños en Miel

Ingredients:
2 cups canola oil, for frying
1 cup flour
2 large ripe bananas, peeled
1/4 cup NESTLÉ® CARNATION® Evaporated Lowfat 2% Milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Directions:

COMBINE flour and bananas in a medium bowl. Use a fork or hands to mash the bananas well and mix them thoroughly into the flour.

ADD the evaporated milk, vanilla extract, and salt. Stir to combine.

DROP spoonfuls of the dough into a large pot of medium-hot oil. Use metal tongs to carefully and continuously splash oil on top of each fritter, and to turn each fritter when it becomes golden brown. Cook only a few at a time so you don’t overcrowd them.

REMOVE each fritter to drain on a paper towel-lined plate when golden brown on both sides.

SERVE warm and with syrup drizzled on top, if desired. (Makes about 1 dozen.)

nuegados salvadorenos

nuégados en miel con chilate

Salvadoran Syrup (“Miel”)

Ingredients:

14 ounces of panela or piloncillo*
3 cups water
10 whole cloves
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

*If you’re unable to find panela, or piloncillo, you can substitute 2 cups of dark brown sugar.

Directions:

COMBINE all ingredients in a medium pot over medium-high heat.

BRING to a boil, stirring occasionally. The panela will melt and break up on its own. No need to force it.

BOIL for a few minutes, stirring when necessary to keep it from boiling over.

LOWER heat and simmer for a few more minutes until the liquid thickens slightly. Dip a spoon in and watch the way it coats the spoon and drips off it. This will give you an idea of whether it has thickened a little.

REMOVE from heat and allow to cool slightly. The syrup will thicken a little bit more upon cooling.

SERVE drizzled over Salvadoran Banana Fritters. Keep any unused portion refrigerated in a jar with a tight-fitting lid.

Salvadoran fritters

***GIVEAWAY CLOSED. CONGRATULATIONS TO JAIME!***

Giveaway Details

Prize description: One lucky winner will receive a $50 gift card.

How to enter: Just leave a comment below telling me your favorite Easter food. (Please read official rules below before entering.)

Official Rules: No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years of age or older to enter. You must be able to provide a U.S. address for prize shipment. Your name and address will only be shared with the PR agency responsible for prize fulfillment for that purpose. Please no P.O. Boxes. One entry per household. Make sure that you enter a valid email address in the email address field so you can be contacted if you win. Winner will be selected at random. Winner has 24 hours to respond. If winner does not respond within 24 hours, a new winner will be selected at random. Giveaway entries are being accepted between March 30, 2015 through April 3rd, 2015. Entries received after April 3rd, 2015 at 11:59 pm EST, will not be considered. The number of eligible entries received determines the odds of winning. If you win, by accepting the prize, you are agreeing that Latinaish.com assumes no liability for damages of any kind. By entering your name below you are agreeing to these Official Rules. Void where prohibited by law.

Buena suerte / Good luck!