Cantinflas Marathon

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Cine Sony Television will have a four-day Thanksgiving weekend Cantinflas movie marathon. From November 24th to November 27th. Starting at 7 am ET, you will be able to watch over 30 Cantinflas films commercial free.

A few of the popular Cantinflas films airing during the marathon include:

• El Analfabeto (The Illiterate One)
• A Volar Joven (To the Skies Young Man)
• Los Tres Mosqueteros (The Three Musketeers)
• El Padrecito (The Good Priest)
• El Bolero De Raquel (Raquel’s Shoeshiner)
• Ni Sangre Ni Arena (Neither Blood Nor Sand)
• El Barrendero (The Sweeper)
• Su Excelencia (Your Excellency)
• Si Yo Fuera Diputado (If I Were A Deputy)
• El Bombero Atomico (The Atomic Fireman)
• Don Quijote Cabalga de Nuevo (Don Quijote Rides Again)
• El Ministro y Yo (The Minister and I)

If you’re not familiar with Mario Moreno (1911-1993) who was professionally known as Cantinflas, you should take this opportunity to get acquainted. Moreno was not just a Mexican Golden Globe-winning comic film actor, but a producer, and screenwriter who was regarded as “the Charlie Chaplin of Mexico” for his onscreen persona of the underdog who overcame all odds. (Chaplin, by the way, upon seeing “Ni Sangre Ni Arena”, declared Cantinflas to be the greatest comedian alive.) In his life off the screen, Moreno was an activist and philanthropist who became a symbol of hope for the downtrodden and impoverished.

As a linguaphile, one of my favorite things about Moreno is how he became a verb.

“Cantinflas is so popular, he even changed the Spanish language. There’s a verb in Spanish: cantinflear. It means to talk in so many circles and puns that everyone ends up completely confused. It was the character’s signature move when caught in a tight spot.” – [JASMINE GARSD/NPR]

The impact Cantinflas had and continues to have, can not be overstated. His films span decades and served not only as entertainment, but as political commentary which is just as relevant today as it was then — commentary which extends well beyond the borders of Mexico.

Links worth checking out:

Cantinflas, With His Puns And Satire, Is Back (And Still Relevant)

Cantinflas on Wikipedia

Not sure if you have Cine Sony? Click here to find the channel

Changing Accents & The Chameleon Effect

Shakira and fellow Colombian singer, Carlos Vives, May 2016

Shakira and fellow Colombian singer, Carlos Vives, May 2016

I saw recently on the news that famous Colombian Shakira was getting some flack for “forgetting her roots.” It turns out, Colombian fans overheard Shakira on the set of a music video speaking with a Spanish accent, rather than her native accent from Barranquilla, Colombia.

Here’s video of the interaction that had some people jumping to judgement.

At 35 seconds into the video you hear Shakira say, “¿Pueden ayudar, por favor?” and apparently some detected the accent there.

This isn’t a new accusation for Shakira, as years ago she was also accused of using an Argentinian accent.

So what’s the deal? Has Shakira forgotten her roots? Does she feel the Argentinian and Spanish accents are superior to her native Colombian accent? Is she being pretentious?

Not at all! What some people don’t realize is that being around people with an accent different than your own can have this effect on some people. It isn’t a coincidence that during the time Shakira seemed to have a bit of an Argentinian accent she was dating Argentine Antonio de la Rúa, and as everyone knows, she now shares her life in Barcelona with Spanish football star, Gerard Piqué.

What Shakira is experiencing is called “mirroring” or the “Chameleon Effect.”

Research has shown that humans unintentionally mirror each other, imitating gestures, body language, and accent. This is a way we subconsciously try to get people to like us, to build rapport, and to seem less threatening. Essentially we’re saying to the other person, I’m similar to you, I belong. You can see this taking place between humans as early as infancy. Ever seen a baby imitating facial expressions?

It’s also been found that people who are more empathetic tend to be more prone to the Chameleon Effect, so is it any wonder Shakira has this “problem”? Look at all the charity work she does, from her own Pies Descalzos Foundation which helps children living in poverty, to her benefit concerts which have served as fundraisers for numerous initiatives, and her role as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador – Shakira is definitely one empathetic individual.

If that’s not enough to change the minds of the skeptical, I’ll add my own personal anecdote. Yes, I have also experienced the Chameleon Effect. I still remember the year we went to my parents’ house for Thanksgiving. Carlos and I had been married probably about five years at that point. I was speaking to my father and he looked at me kind of funny. When I finished talking he said, “You’re speaking with an accent.” That was the first time I become self-conscious of it, but he was right, I had picked up some of Carlos’s accent in English which made me sound vaguely like it wasn’t my own native language. To this day I catch myself sometimes, but who knows how often it happens because I’m just not even aware of it.

Has this ever happened to you? What is your own experience with the Chameleon Effect?

El Baile del Cuchumbo

randu

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Después de ver en las noticias de El Salvador, Carlos me enseño este video que se llama “El Baile del Cuchumbo” por un nuevo talento salvadoreño que se llama Randu. Por la mayor parte me gustó pero no sé mucho sobre el cantante. La única cosa que queda claro es que la canción es muy pegadiza y este muchacho sí sabe bailar. Me encanta verlo y aprender nueva coreografía. Aquí está la canción. ¿Qué opinan?

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

After seeing it on the Salvadoran news, Carlos showed me this video that’s called “El Baile del Cuchumbo” by a new Salvadoran talent named Randu. For the most part I liked it but I don’t know much about the singer. The only thing that’s clear to me is the song is catchy and this young man definitely knows how to dance. I love to watch him and learn new choreography. Here’s the song. What do you think?

#SiAmasADios

Si Amas a Dios - Espinoza Paz

Over a week ago Regional Mexican artist and composer Espinoza Paz announced that he would be releasing a new song called “Si Amas a Dios”, (#SiAmasADios on Twitter) inspired by the 43 students of Ayotzinapa, Mexico.

The song is now available free to download from iTunes.

If you don’t have iTunes, you can also find it on YouTube.

I searched the internet and wasn’t able to find the lyrics so (with a little help from Carlos), I transcribed them myself. Here they are for anyone else who wants them.

Si Amas a Dios

por Espinoza Paz

Si amas a Dios
No tomes café con el diablo mañana
Hagamos consciencia hermano, hermana
¿O de qué lado estás?

Si amas a Dios
No juegues al bueno con esa pelota
No dejes que al vaso le caiga otra gota
¿O de qué lado estás?

Si amas a Dios
Es tiempo de hacerle caricias al mundo
Dile que lo sientes en lo más profundo
de tu corazón.

Si amas a Dios
No cierres los ojos, la boca, y la puerta
Se encuentra encendido un foco de alerta
Ya pasa la voz.

Si amas a Dios
No rompas piñatas llenas de pistolas
Que ya no se tiñan de rojo las olas
¿O de qué lado estás?

Si amas a Dios
Oremos por todos los que tienen hambre
No dejes que siga rodando el estambre
¿O de qué lado estás?

Si amas a Dios
Es tiempo de hacerle caricias al mundo
Dile que lo sientes en lo más profundo
de tu corazón.

Si amas a Dios
No cierres los ojos, la boca, y la puerta
Se encuentra encendido un foco de alerta
Ya pasa la voz.

No dejes que la maldad gane más terreno.
Sólo nosotros podemos ponerle freno.
No más veneno.

Si amas a Dios
Es tiempo de hacerle caricias al mundo
Dile que lo sientes en lo más profundo
de tu corazón.

Si amas a Dios
No cierres los ojos, la boca, y la puerta
Se encuentra encendido un foco de alerta
Ya pasa la voz.

Si amas a Dios.
Si amas a Dios.

On Fictional Immigrants, Accents & Why We Like What We Like

I’ve mentioned my love for Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz) and his accent, on more than one occasion, but yesterday a thought occurred to me – a sort of, “Which came first? The chicken or the egg?” sort of question. I wondered, was it already pre-programmed within me to like accents and Ricky Ricardo just happened to be the first to ignite it? – Or was there something about Ricky Ricardo that created a preference for that specific quality?

Whether it’s accents or ice cream flavors, who can really say why we like what we like? Maybe a psychologist or brain specialist of some sort would be able to explain this better – I’m not really prepared to delve into that today, or probably ever.

What I do want to talk about are fictional immigrants in film and television, as well as actors putting on an accent which is not native to them, because these are stories and characters I’m very often drawn to. There’s a fine line between creating an authentic character and one that reinforces stereotypes, but I’ve had some favorites over the years. Here they are in no particular order.

Actor Bronson Pinchot played the very loveable Balki Bartokomous on the sitcom Perfect Strangers. Balki was supposed to be from a fictional island in the Mediterranean Sea called Mypos. Pinchot is an American actor born in New York.

Actor Tom Hanks played Viktor Navorski of the fictional country Krakozhia in the movie, The Terminal. Tom Hanks was originally born in California, and you probably already know what his regular speaking voice sounds like.

Actor Adhir Kalyan played Raja Musharaff, a Pakistani exchange student sent to live with a family in Wisconsin on the TV show Aliens in America. In real life, Adhir Kalyan was born in South Africa and speaks with a lovely South African accent.

Actor Naveen Andrews played Sayid Jarrah, an Iraqi character on the TV show LOST. Andrews was actually born in London, England and is of Indian heritage. His regular speaking voice is with a British accent.

Can you think of other actors who played characters from fictional countries or who put on an accent that wasn’t their own?

Chicharito and #WorldCupWives

Oh my! Chicharito, you like white bread? Why didn't you say so? Aquí estoy, guapo.

Oh my! Chicharito, you like white bread? Why didn’t you say so? Aquí estoy, guapo.

Image source: Gary Denness

This morning, up before the sun, I grabbed my phone and started going through email before I was even out of bed. I don’t really encourage this habit, but some days, like today, I will come upon something in my email that puts a smile on my face and wakes me up on the right note.

The smile on my face this morning was put there by a video posted on Mi Blog es Tu Blog, (which I subscribe to because Laura Martínez is awesome at discovering really interesting and often hilarious things.) The video she posted is actually a re-blog of something she discovered back in 2011, but I’m glad she re-blogged it because I had never seen it, and maybe it’ll be new to you, too.

The video was uploaded by a creative young woman by the name of Brittany Young, who is apparently a soccer fan, and a Chicharito fan in particular. (A girl after my own corazón!) – The song is set to The Beatles’ “Let it Be” and is called “Little Pea.” ¡Me encanta!

I actually heard a rumor that Chicharito may play for Barcelona, (Chicharito and Messi? Hello, unstoppable team!) so I hope we can anticipate a Javier Hernández tribute song to the tune of a Julio Iglesias or Gypsy Kings song. Anyway, while we’re on the topic of Chicharito songs, have I ever shared “El Chicharito”? – I don’t think I have. Be prepared to have this stuck in your head for the rest of the day. Jajajaja…

Carajo, while we’re here, let’s just make a Chicharito playlist.

Okay, not really – those are actually the best Chicharito songs, so I’ll stop there, but since we’re talking about fútbol, I wanted to mention a new project one of my fellow gringa bloggers is working on called “World Cup Wives.” Sarah of A Life With Subtitles and her friend Katie are going to be doing some video commentary of the games this summer. Apparently their husbands tend to be “less than enthusiastic” regarding their comments on players’ cuteness, family lives, attractiveness of uniforms, and such. (I understand where they’re coming from because I’m probably going to have to pay for that little piropo I made at the very top of this blog post about “white bread.” Carlos won’t be amused.)

Anyway, you can see the first #WorldCupWives blog post here and the first video here, (both are hilarious and worth checking out!) … If you’re a blogger and relate to being a #WorldCupWife, you’re also invited to share a post or video about how you were introduced to the world of soccer using the hashtag.

Less than 50 days to go until the start of the games! Until then… El Chicharito, el Chicharito, el Chicharitoritoritooo!…

Note: I am not an official sponsor or partner of the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™. Any mention of the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™ was editorial in nature and should not be interpreted as an endorsement on their part of myself, my opinions, or this website. I am just a soccer fan sharing with other soccer fans. All opinions are my own.

Libros for All Kids

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Hola! This is a guest post by Cuban American author, Meg Medina, as part of the Latinas for Latino Lit 2nd annual Día Blog Hop, which we’re proudly participating in for the second year in a row. Check it out! (And then check out the other L4LL’s Día Blog Hop posts from other Latino/a children’s and YA authors.)

Libros for All Kids

A guest post by: Meg Medina

Something happened to me recently at the National Latino Children’s Literature Conference that gave me a glimmer of hope against the dismal  – and now familiar – news that we are still publishing too few kids’ books that feature Latino characters.  

I had been asked to talk about my young adult novel, YAQUI DELGADO WANTS TO KICK YOUR ASS.  It earned the Pura Belpré medal and the CYBILS Fiction Award, among other nice distinctions, and it was one of the measly two percent of children’s books by or about Latinos that was published last year.

If you’re unfamiliar, my novel is set in Queens, New York, and is the story of 16 year-old Piedad Sanchez who finds herself in the cross-hairs of a school bully.

After my talk, a librarian named Erica came to find me. It’s always such an honor when someone tells you they connected with your story. But I was especially happy to hear from her. She grew up in suburban Wisconsin with all brothers. There were no Latinos to speak of in her world.

“I read your book and I thought, oh my God, that’s my story.”

I could have kissed her whole face.

She’s right, of course. It is her story. It’s her story exactly the way Charlotte’s Web once felt like my story as a kid, even though I’d never seen a live pig and I lived two-hundred miles from the nearest farm in New York.

It’s no secret that I write stories that feature Latino kids and their families – the whole glorious ajiaco that I grew up with and that shaped how I move through the world.

But I do not write stories only for Latino kids. I write books for all kids about the universal problems of growing up. You remember that horror, don’t you? The frustrations with your family? Being betrayed by peers? Falling in love with creeps? To me, it doesn’t matter if a girl is named Fern or Piedad. What really matters is that her story is told with honesty and compassion.

When I think of books and what we want reflected in them, I say that it’s wise to cast a wide net. All kids benefit from stories that not only affirm their own experience but that also that allow them a peek at those same experiences through a slightly different lens. The magic of such books is in that beautiful spot where the unique and the universal hold hands like good and faithful friends.

meg-medinaMeg Medina is an award-winning Cuban American author who writes picture books, middle grade, and YA fiction. The first American citizen in her family, Meg was raised in Queens, New York by her mother – and a clan of tios, primos, and abuelos who arrived from Cuba over the years. She was the fortunate victim of their storytelling, and credits them with her passion for tales.

Meg’s work examines how cultures intersect through the eyes of young people, and she brings to audiences stories that speak to both what is unique in Latino culture and to the qualities that are universal. Her favorite protagonists are strong girls.

Her books are: MILAGROS GIRL FROM AWAY; TIA ISA WANTS A CAR, for which she earned the 2012 Ezra Jack Keats New Writers Award; THE GIRL WHO COULD SILENCE THE WIND, a 2012 Bank Street Best Books; and YAQUI DELGADO WANTS TO KICK YOUR ASS, which was the winner of the 2014 Pura Belpré Medal, which is presented annually by the American Library Association to a Latino writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth.

When she is not writing, Meg works on community projects that support girls, Latino youth and/or literacy. She lives with her extended family in Richmond, Virginia.

Follow Meg’s blog at www.megmedina.com

Connect with Meg on Facebook and Twitter