Películas Clasicas Mexicanas

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation is in italics!

¿Te gustan las películas clasicas mexicanas? Aquí están algunas de mis escenas favoritas. ¿Cuáles son tus favoritas?

Do you like classic Mexican movies? Here are some of my favorite scenes. Which are your favorites?

Poker de Reinas – Corazón de Melón

Pedro Infante – Escuela de Vagabundos – Cucurrucucú Paloma

Pedro Infante – Carta a Eufemia

A Toda Máquina – Gringuita – Pedro Infante y Luis Aguilar

Los Tres Garcias – Pedro Infante

Los Tres Garcias – Pedro Infante, Abel Salazar, Víctor Manuel Mendoza, Sara García & Marga López

Jorge Negrete – Huapango Ranchero

Cantinflas – Por Mis Pistolas

La Música de Dawin y Una Canción Justin Bieber Estilo Bachata!

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. English translation in italics!

dawin

Dawin Polanco es un joven músico dominicano-americano con mucho talento. Él no sólo canta, sino que también toca la guitarra y el piano. Vean por ustedes mismos – aquí es su versión de As Long As You Love Me por Justin Bieber, pero estilo bachata. Me encanta!

(Dawin Polanco is a young Dominican-American musician with a lot of talent. Not only does he sing, but he also plays guitar and piano. Look for yourself – here is his version of As Long As You Love Me by Justin Bieber, but bachata style. I love it!)

Claro que Dawin tiene sus propias canciones también, como esta canción, Light of Day (Let ‘Em Go). ¡Qué bella la canción!(Of course Dawin has his own songs too, like this one, Light of Day (Let ‘Em Go).) It’s so beautiful!

Quieren aprender más sobre Dawin? Aquí les traigo una mini-entrevista con él. Chécalo! (Want to learn more about Dawin? Here I bring you a mini-interview with him. Check it out!)

Latinaish habla con cantante, Dawin

(Latinaish speaks with singer, Dawin)

Latinaish: Eres dominicano-americano, ¿Cómo han contribuido las dos culturas en tu vida? (You’re Dominican-American – How have those two cultures contributed to your life?)

Dawin: Sí soy dominicano – estas culturas me han dado el lujo de poder disfrutar plenamente o comprender lo que sucede en el mundo inglés y español. (Yes, I’m Dominican – these cultures have given me the luxury of being able to fully enjoy or understand what is happening in the English and Spanish world.)

Latinaish: ¿Por qué haces música? Parece una pregunta simple, pero no siempre tiene una respuesta fácil! Lo sé porque la gente me ha preguntado por qué escribo.(Why do you make music? It seems like a simple question, but it doesn’t always have an easy answer! I know because people have asked me before why I write.)

Dawin: Es cierto. Por suerte siempre he tenido mi respuesta [se ríe.] Hago música porque es mi manera de vaciar mi mente de cosas negativas y crear música es mi forma de rejuvenecer. (It’s true. Luckily I’ve always had my answer [laughs.] I make music because it’s my way to empty my mind of negative things and making music is my way of rejuvenating.)

Latinaish: ¿Dónde podemos encontrar/comprar tu música? ¿Crees que un día vamos a escuchar una canción en español o spanglish de ti? (Where can we find/buy your music? Do you think we’ll ever hear a song from you in Spanish or Spanglish?)

Dawin: Mi música se puede encontrar en sitios como YouTube donde me gusta hacer mis estrenos. Tengo música gratis y disponible para descarga aquí: www.soundcloud.com/dawin y en iTunes. Te prometo que voy a hacer una canción en español o spanglish y como continuar con mi éxito, me gustaría hacerlo con artistas conocidos. (My music can be found on sites like YouTube where I like to make my premieres. I have free music and it’s available for download here: www.soundcloud.com/dawin and on iTunes. I promise I’ll do a song in Spanish or Spanglish and to continue with my success, I would like to do it with well-known artists.)

Enlaces/Links:

DawinMusic.com
Dawin on Twitter
Dawin on Facebook
Dawin on iTunes

Sonus – Bilingual Boy Band

sonus

Check out these clever, clever boys. Alex, Marcelo, and Andres are three brothers and together they are the band, Sonus.

All three boys were born in California but live in Argentina and I’m predicting right now, (thanks in part to their smart bilingual marketing and strong social media presence), that they are going to be the NEXT BIG THING in the United States. (The music is catchy too!)

Chécalo!

Spanish-language song – Vecina

English version – Save Me Tonight

(Hat tip to WetPaint.com)

La Llorona coming to televisions across the United States

Do you know the Latin American folktale (or is it true?) called La Llorona? (The Weeping Woman.)

For those not familiar, here is the story of La Llorona.

Although several variations exist, the basic story tells of a beautiful woman by the name of Maria killing her children by drowning them in order to be with the man that she loved. The man would not have her, which devastated her. She would not take no for an answer, so he slit her throat and threw her body in a lake in Mexico. Challenged at the gates of heaven as to the whereabouts of her children, she is not permitted to enter the afterlife until she has found them. Maria is forced to wander the Earth for all eternity, searching in vain for her drowned offspring, with her constant weeping giving her the name “La Llorona”.

In some versions of this tale and legend, La Llorona will kidnap wandering children who resemble her missing children, or children who disobey their parents. People who claim to have seen her say she appears at night or in the late evenings from rivers or oceans in Mexico. Some believe that those who hear the wails of La Llorona are marked for death, similar to the Gaelic banshee legend. She is said to cry “Ay, mis hijos!” which translates to “Oh, my children!

Function of the story in society

Typically, the legend serves as a cautionary tale on several levels. Parents will warn their children that bad behavior will cause La Llorona to abduct them, and that being outside after dark will result in her visitation. The tale also warns young women not to be enticed by status, wealth, material goods, or by men who make declarations of love or lavish promises.

– Source: Wikipedia.

Well, this Friday’s episode of Grimm is about La Llorona. The show Grimm is an American TV drama series which is described as “a cop drama—with a twist… a dark and fantastical project about a world in which characters inspired by Grimms’ Fairy Tales exist.”

This clip features Grimm stars Bitsie Tulloch (Juliette Silverton), David Giuntoli (Nick Burkhardt), Russell Hornsby (Hank Griffin.) Guests cast in this episode include Bertila Damas as “Pilar” and David Barrera as “Luis Alvarez.”

Kate del Castillo (of “La Reina del Sur” fame), is also in this episode!

Grimm airs Fridays at 9 pm ET on NBC. This particular episode will air on NBC on Friday, October 26th at 9 pm ET. There will also be special airings, in Spanish on Telemundo at 11:35 pm ET on October 29th and in English on mun2 at 1 am ET on Saturday, October 27th.

Honestly, I don’t know if I’ll watch because this kind of stuff freaks me out. I will probably have a week’s worth of pesadillas just from watching these videos here. Do you think you’ll tune in?

Fiesta DC 2012

Taking photos at Fiesta DC this past Sunday was a challenge for a number of reasons, but one of those reasons was the sheer number of other people trying to photograph and video tape the event. At times I felt like I was in a group of paparazzi fighting for position – and then when I would finally frame the perfect shot, someone would inevitably ruin it by running across with a video camera or sticking their iPhone in front of me.

Some of the people were amateur or hobbyist photographers like me, some were obviously freelance professionals or working for media – And then there were young males, usually equipped with cellphone cameras, who were just trying to photograph the nalgas of the cachiporras to share on their Facebook.

Anyway, here are my favorite shots which I had some fun editing and a video of the general atmosphere.

By the way, speaking of nalgas, at one point during the parade a woman with a very generous backside stood in front of us. Carlos, to his credit, didn’t even seem to notice despite the fact that her “pants” were actually leggings and you could see her thong through the fabric.

“¡Qué bárbara!” a little old man said. The old man, not content to enjoy the view by himself and feeling the need to share, elbowed Carlos. Jutting his chin towards the woman in front of them he said, with a lascivious expression on his face, “Ella es Santa Bárbara, ¿vá?”

Carlos looked confused, “Oh, ¿sí?” he replied.
“Ssssíííííí,” the viejo hissed appraising the woman’s behind, practically licking his lips. Noting the fact that Carlos didn’t understand what he meant, the viejo then asked, “¿No sabes?”

“¿No?” Carlos said, the question on his face.

I rolled my eyes at the predictable dirty old man.

“¡Es santa por delante y bárbara por atrás!” the viejo said, erupting in laughter as if he had said the most clever and original thing in the world.

Carlos laughed politely and I pinched him.

“What?” Carlos said.
“Stand back here, away from the viejo chuco,” I said.

After the parade we had lunch. I wanted pupusas but Carlos made a good point that we eat pupusas all the time and that we should eat something different, so we ended up buying delicious Mexican tortas. (The boys and I had the torta milanesa de pollo with horchata. Carlos had the torta de carnitas with agua fresca de tamarindo.)

Just as we finished eating and were deciding what to do next, I heard “Los Hermanos Lovo” announced on a nearby stage.

“No way!” I said out loud, “Hermanos Lovo!”

Carlos looked at me like I had lost my mind as I pulled his hand in the direction of the stage.

“It’s the Chanchona music I blogged about. Remember?… Hermanos Lovo!”

For three songs I tapped my hand against my side, tapped my feet, and moved my hips, waiting for people to dance, but only a few people were dancing, and they were getting stared at. Everyone else just pretty much stood there and watched the performance. I found this a little strange given that at most Latino dominant events I’ve been too, there’s usually not a lack of dancing. I wonder if most of the people there have become too Americanized in this respect? Too self-conscious?

I couldn’t take it anymore. I leaned toward Carlos and he leaned toward me so he could hear me.

“Want to dance?” I asked, eyes brimming with hope like a child asking for a puppy.

Carlos said nothing, just turned toward me and took me in his arms, and we danced.

Within seconds much of the crowd had turned to look at us and stood gaping. Carlos whispered in my ear, “We’re being photographed and video taped.” I felt a flood of gringa self-consciousness wash through me but we kept dancing, and soon, the people around us, were just a blur of colors.

Don Cuatro

Image source: Alvaro Canivell

Months ago while watching videos on YouTube I stumbled onto a TV Show called “Fin de Semana.”

Fin de Semana was a long running variety show in El Salvador similar to Sabado Gigante with a host by the name of Willie Maldonado. I asked Carlos if he remembered the show and he said he remembered someone named “Don Cuatro.”

I searched all over the internet and couldn’t find anything about Don Cuatro, and Carlos has only a vague memory. He says that the way he remembers it is like this:

Don Cuatro was a mystery character that they never showed on screen. At some point during the show they would say “Don Cuatro is in such-and-such neighborhood” and they would give viewers a code phrase that they were to say to Don Cuatro while shaking his hand to get him to reveal himself. People who lived in that neighborhood would rush outside and start going around trying to find Don Cuatro by shaking other people’s hands and saying the code phrase. Whoever found Don Cuatro would win money and be brought on the show.

I don’t know why, but this struck me as hilarious. Does anyone remember Don Cuatro? Has Carlos remembered it correctly?

Ai Se Eu Te Pego – In Spanish!

I can’t remember when exactly I first heard and fell in love with Ai Se Eu Te Pego by Michel Teló – Was it a year ago? Two years ago?

For those not familiar, here is the original song – I love this video because it has the Spanish subtitles of the lyrics in Portuguese and also because those Spanish lyrics were written by a Spaniard who used the verb “coger” – A perfectly normal word in Spain meaning “to catch” or “to grab” – but to Latin American ears, (or gringa ears that are used to Latin American Spanish), the word means “to fuck” and it’s either offensive or hilarious. (I’m in the hilarious camp.)

While I can’t remember when I discovered the song, I can remember the way I discovered it, which was through watching videos of celebratory dances after fútbol goals. A lot of Brazilian soccer players like to do the Ai Se Eu Te Pego dance when they score a goal. Neymar seems to be an especially big fan – so much so that he’s brought the dance into the locker room as a way to annoy/entertain his teammates.

However, Ronaldo and Marcelo like to dance, too.

Muchachos, if you don’t enjoy watching Neymar and Ronaldo doing that provocative little dance as much as I do, my apologies. Feel free to go over to Pitbull’s remix of the song, a video which features women in bikinis. (It’s Pitbull. Would you expect anything less?)

Anyway, yesterday at work, one of Carlos’s Mexican coworkers started singing Ai Se Eu Te Pego, but he had changed the words to Spanish:

Hermosa, hermosa usted a mi me mata
Ay si te veo, ay ay si te veo eh
Hermosa, hermosa usted a mi me mata
Ay si te beso, ay ay si te beso eh

Of course I thought this was hilarious and started to type up a Facebook status to share, and then I asked myself, “Wait a minute… maybe there’s really a Spanish remix and he was just singing it?”

The song’s popularity would certainly have resulted in a Spanish version, by now, right? Come on, if there is a Spanish version of Michael Jackson’s Thriller out there, and a Spanish Duranguense version of Justin Bieber’s Baby, surely there must be a Spanish version of the wildly popular Ai Se Eu Te Pego by Michel Teló! … Well gente, the internet did not let me down. Here it is, Ai Se Eu Te Pego, versión español. This one is called, Ay si te beso by Argentinian musician, “Feice.” Chécalo!

Not crazy about that one? Here’s one by a guy who simply goes by the name Roberto:

Another one in Spanish by DJotta y Fenix:

This Spanish version by Rico Alexis actually uses the phrasing “Ay, si te cojo, mami” – the guy is Chilean but living in Spain – so did he mean it the Spanish way or the Chilean way? You decide.