#SiAmasADios

Si Amas a Dios - Espinoza Paz

Over a week ago Regional Mexican artist and composer Espinoza Paz announced that he would be releasing a new song called “Si Amas a Dios”, (#SiAmasADios on Twitter) inspired by the 43 students of Ayotzinapa, Mexico.

The song is now available free to download from iTunes.

If you don’t have iTunes, you can also find it on YouTube.

I searched the internet and wasn’t able to find the lyrics so (with a little help from Carlos), I transcribed them myself. Here they are for anyone else who wants them.

Si Amas a Dios

por Espinoza Paz

Si amas a Dios
No tomes café con el diablo mañana
Hagamos consciencia hermano, hermana
¿O de qué lado estás?

Si amas a Dios
No juegues al bueno con esa pelota
No dejes que al vaso le caiga otra gota
¿O de qué lado estás?

Si amas a Dios
Es tiempo de hacerle caricias al mundo
Dile que lo sientes en lo más profundo
de tu corazón.

Si amas a Dios
No cierres los ojos, la boca, y la puerta
Se encuentra encendido un foco de alerta
Ya pasa la voz.

Si amas a Dios
No rompas piñatas llenas de pistolas
Que ya no se tiñan de rojo las olas
¿O de qué lado estás?

Si amas a Dios
Oremos por todos los que tienen hambre
No dejes que siga rodando el estambre
¿O de qué lado estás?

Si amas a Dios
Es tiempo de hacerle caricias al mundo
Dile que lo sientes en lo más profundo
de tu corazón.

Si amas a Dios
No cierres los ojos, la boca, y la puerta
Se encuentra encendido un foco de alerta
Ya pasa la voz.

No dejes que la maldad gane más terreno.
Sólo nosotros podemos ponerle freno.
No más veneno.

Si amas a Dios
Es tiempo de hacerle caricias al mundo
Dile que lo sientes en lo más profundo
de tu corazón.

Si amas a Dios
No cierres los ojos, la boca, y la puerta
Se encuentra encendido un foco de alerta
Ya pasa la voz.

Si amas a Dios.
Si amas a Dios.

Feliz Pupusa Day 2014!

pupusa-postcard

Disclosure: Latinaish.com has partnered with Cricket Wireless as a 2014 Blog Ambassador. All opinions are my own.

Happy National Pupusa Day, gente! To celebrate I hope you go to your favorite pupusería with your familia and enjoy one of each kind with plenty of curtido y salsa. (Or make some yourself. I’ve got several recipes here.)

If you live in the DC area there’s plenty of pupusa places to choose from. Over the years I’ve shared the names of a few of my favorites. Today I want to give a shout out to a pupusería we discovered this past year called Flor Blanca in Winchester, Virginia. It’s a small place, nothing fancy – reminds me of the comedors back in El Salvador – but they have excellent pupusas (and plenty of other super authentic Salvadoran food.) The best day to check them out is Tuesday or Thursday when they have 99 cent pupusas!

Last time we went to Flor Blanca I snapped a couple photos with my Cricket Wireless Samsung Galaxy. Ever since I’ve gotten this phone I have completely abandoned my camera – I love the photos it takes.

flor-blanca-restuarant

pupusas-flor-blanca-1

Need a pupusa playlist for your car ride to the pupusería? Here are some good pupusa-themed songs I found in Cricket Wireless’s Muve Music store.

pupusa-playlist

Yes. I now have a Pupusa Playlist.

You can learn more about Cricket Wireless by following the #ConMiCricket hashtag and @MiCricket on Twitter.

Jane the Virgin: Quotes (Citas)

jane-the-virgin

Today is Spanish Friday so this post is in Spanish. If you participated in Spanish Friday on your own blog, leave your link in comments. Scroll down for English translation!

Usualmente yo no me obsesiono con un programa de televisión, pero yo estoy completamente obsesionada con Jane the Virgin. Cada semana no puedo esperar para el próximo episodio. Mis hijos también les encantan el show. No he querido un show así desde Herederos del Monte. Los actores son todos brillantes, el elenco es diverso, hay una buena mezcla de inglés y español y la trama es perfectamente complicada. Sólo he visto tres episodios y me he reído tanto y también he sido tocada hasta el punto de llorar.

Aquí están tres de mis frases favoritas hasta el momento de la serie. (¿Cuáles son las tuyos?)

“Inhala, exhala, inhala, exhala.” – Rogelio

“I needed a croqueta… I would offer you some but I’m really enjoying it and if I give you a bite I may resent you in a very serious way.” – Jane

“Las pequeñas mentiras se convierten en grandes bolas de maldad.” – La abuela

¿Quieres más Jane the Virgin?

5 Reasons To Watch Jane The Virgin en Remezcla.

Mira Jane the Virgin en linea.

[ENGLISH TRANSLATION]

Usually I don’t become obsessed with television shows, but I’m totally obsessed with Jane the Virgin. Each week I can’t wait for the next episode. Both my sons love it too. I haven’t loved a show this much since Herederos del Monte. The actors are all brilliant, the cast is diverse, there’s a good mix of English and Spanish and the plot is perfectly complicated. I have only watched three episodes and I’ve laughed so much and even been touched to the point of tears too.

Here are three of my favorite lines so far from the show. (What are yours?)

“Inhala, exhala, inhala, exhala.” – Rogelio

“I needed a croqueta… I would offer you some but I’m really enjoying it and if I give you a bite I may resent you in a very serious way.” – Jane

“Las pequeñas mentiras se convierten en grandes bolas de maldad.” – La abuela

Want more Jane the Virgin?

5 Reasons To Watch Jane The Virgin on Remezcla.

Watch Jane the Virgin online.

Más y Menos – Guatemalan Cartoon Characters!

masymenos

Last night my 12 year old begged me to watch a cartoon called Teen Titans Go! with him. Honestly, I’m not at all into super hero stuff so this show didn’t appeal to me at all, but he promised me this particular episode had two characters who only speak Spanish. (He knows how to get my attention!)

I ended up really enjoying the episode and the characters named Más y Menos. The episode had an impressive amount of Spanish in it and some good lessons for kids built in. Here’s a clip of the twins Más y Menos making and serving tamales to their friends.

I later looked up more information online, and as suggested by the mention of “tamales de Guatemala” in the episode, the twins are in fact supposed to be Guatemalan. (Although they’re voiced by Chicago-born Freddy Rodriguez whose parents are Puerto Rican.)

Anyway, I thought it was really awesome to have some Central American representation in a popular cartoon and I hope the creators make Más y Menos regular characters.

My only suggestion to the creators: When the characters say “¡Los Tamales de Guatemala!” you see and hear mariachi. While mariachi can be found in Guatemala, that’s obviously more of a Mexican thing. It would have been awesome if instead you had used some traditional Guatemalan marimba music like this:

The use of Mexican culture subbed in for other Latin American culture is something you see often in television and movies. Mexican culture is more familiar to audiences in the United States so I think that is part of why it happens, but when characters are not Mexican then you’re doing a disservice to both the Mexican culture and the true culture of the character. I’d like to see Hollywood break away from that so audiences can have a more diverse experience and expand their knowledge of cultures throughout the world. Subbing in Mexican culture for every Latin American culture only feeds into the wrong belief that “All Latinos are the same.”

As Más y Menos say, “Para crecer como una persona, necesitas que abrirte a nuevas experiencias.”

You can watch the full episode of Teen Titans Go! featuring the characters Más y Menos here and on Cartoon Network.

Free Phone Calls to Latin America!

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Disclosure: Latinaish.com has partnered with Cricket Wireless as a 2014 Blog Ambassador. All opinions are my own.

Just wanted to let you all know, Cricket Wireless is celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month by inviting you to their stores to make a free phone call to amigos or familia in Mexico, Argentina, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Paraguay, Peru, Spain and Venezuela from October 1st to October 3rd. Check with your local Cricket location to see if they’re participating!

For more from Cricket Wireless ambassadors, follow the #VidaConCricket hashtag and @MiCricket on Twitter.

Back When Clair Huxtable Was Dominican

clair

Played by Phylicia Rashād, Clair Huxtable on The Cosby Show has always been one of my favorite T.V. characters for a multitude of reasons, but one of those reasons is the dash of Spanish she brought to the series. If you didn’t know, Rashād is bilingual English/Spanish. Born in Houston, Texas, her family moved to Mexico when she was a child to escape racism in the United States – and that’s how she learned the language.

While Clair’s character remained bilingual throughout the series, Bill Cosby had originally wanted the character to be Dominican. The character of Clair was inspired by I Love Lucy’s Ricky Ricardo, and like Ricky Ricardo, she would speak Spanish when angry. If you listen closely in the pilot episode of The Cosby Show, you can hear Clair speaking Spanish to the kids as she’s coming down the stairs, saying ¡No me digas que no, ey, porque de todas maneras tú lo tienes que hacer!

In another early episode (Season 1, Episode 23, “Mr. Quiet”), Clair is portrayed as a mother raising the children to be bilingual. In this scene Clair answers the phone and speaks Spanish. After the phone call, Rudy speaks to her mother in Spanish, with Cliff in the middle looking confused. (Clair speaks Spanish throughout this episode. Watch from 1:57 to 2:42, then at approximately 4:30 to 4:41, 14:22 to 15:00, and 16:42 to 17:10.)

The Cosby Show: S01 E23

I can’t really say that I wish they had kept Clair as Dominican and made the kids bilingual as the series went on – as amazing as that would have been – because I loved the show exactly as it was and it was a historically very important show, not just in the United States, but around the world. That being said, I’m still wondering where the Latino Cosby Show is and hoping it will happen sooner rather than later.

SUN BELT EXPRESS – immigration, humor and corazón

Screen Shot 2014-09-17 at 4.31.07 PM

When I was contacted two years ago by producer Evan Buxbaum about his script for SUN BELT EXPRESS, I was hesitant. He wanted to make a film about undocumented immigrants that “could find some of the humor and light, in what is typically a very dark subject.” I asked myself, is that possible? Can one mix humor and such a serious topic?

In the end I agreed to be a beta-reader because Evan seemed very sincere and I thought it was wise of him to verify authenticity in the dialogue and seek opinions of those close to the topic at hand.

I read his script in its entirety and ended up loving it. Evan thanked me for the feedback and I hadn’t really thought much about his project since then, but this week Evan contacted me again – the film has been completed and will be premiering in the U.S. this October. (Check www.sunbeltexpressmovie.com for locations and dates.)

Today I had the opportunity to watch the full-length finished film and found it very much worth sharing with all of you. My review is below, but in short, I encourage you all to support the film and go see it if you’re able to. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

(Full disclosure: As stated, I was a beta-reader for the SUN BELT EXPRESS script and as such you can see my name in the film credits under general “thanks”, however this review reflects only my honest opinion.)

Review – SUN BELT EXPRESS

Allen King (Tate Donovan) is a divorced Ethics professor in southern Arizona who, accused of plagiarism and fired, is forced to commute daily to his new teaching job across the border in Mexico. The money he makes isn’t enough to keep up with his own bills or car maintenance, let alone meet the financial demands of his ex-wife (Rachel Harris) or pay his teenage daughter’s private school tuition. To supplement his income, Allen gets wrapped up in smuggling Mexican immigrants across the border in the trunk of his beat up 1972 Volvo.

Things get complicated when his teenage daughter (India Ennenga) mistakenly thinks her father is doing something altruistic and unexpectedly tags along for the ride. Add in a pregnant ex-girlfriend (Ana de la Reguera), three Mexican men in the trunk, two corrupt U.S. Border Patrol agents, and an overheated car that breaks down at the worst possible moment, and you have a situation that would seem to be no laughing matter – but that’s where you’d be wrong.

Mexicans have a dicho – “Al mal tiempo, buena cara” – which means put on a good face during bad times. Be positive; it’s an attitude shared by many Latin Americans. And while most films on immigration show the heartbreaking reality, the difficult choices made, the perilous journey – SUN BELT EXPRESS is a rare exploration into the humor of this mostly solemn situation.

Talk long enough to a person who immigrated illegally to the United States – more often than not, they will have a funny story or two to tell about their journey. My own husband has told me stories about a guy who accompanied him and carried a bottle of Pepto-Bismol like a hip flask which he regularly took sips from “to help with his nerves.” During another part of his journey, he wasn’t able to turn off a broken sink in a motel bathroom and chaos ensued.

For me, the brilliance of the film SUN BELT EXPRESS is found in moments like this. The dialogue between “passengers” Rafi and Miguel in the trunk is the main highlight. Rafi (Oscar Avila), who is somewhat fat, makes a stressful situation even more stressful for Miguel (Arturo Castro), who happens to be claustrophobic. If lack of space wasn’t enough of a problem, Rafi is quite generous with stories about all the adventures he’s had trying to cross the border before, although he’s only been caught “cinco, seis veces…o lo mucho siete.” The chemistry between these two actors is fantastic, and the friendship that blooms between them on screen made me smile as much as the well-acted humorous lines which are never crass but full of corazón.

SUN BELT EXPRESS contains plenty of entertainment in the form of humor, but it’s well-balanced by a bigger message. Serious themes including morality and political corruption are an essential part of the plot but the film never comes across as preachy. In the end, the deeply flawed protagonist redeems himself and the film succeeds at traversing the difficult border between heartfelt humor and hurtful ridicule when dealing with extremely sensitive subject matter. SUN BELT EXPRESS is a daring, fresh take on the immigration journey which is just as likely to spark important conversation as it is laughter.