Canticos – Los Pollitos / Little Chickies

los-pollitos-canticos-book

I’m really excited to share this new book collection and app with you guys because it’s adorable and amazing in every way. By the end of this post, you’ll see what I mean.

The book series and apps are part of a project called Canticos which brings to life some of the most beloved Latin American nursery rhymes and children’s songs; it’s a project created by two Latino families with roots in Venezuela, Colombia, The Dominican Republic, and El Salvador, with a mission to develop products and stories that would share their culture and language with today’s kids.

I’m sure you’re familiar with the song that inspired the first book in the series, LOS POLLITOS / LITTLE CHICKIES by Susie Jaramillo which is based on “Los Pollitos Dicen” (pío, pío, pío!) – But the song hasn’t just been transformed into an adorable bilingual lift-the-flap book, there’s an educational app [available for iOS and android], and sing-along videos to go with it.

The sturdy reversible book is quite ingenious in the way it folds out, with one side being Spanish and the other side in English. The illustrations are super cute, and to be honest I thought I couldn’t fall more in love with this project until I tried the app.

Let me tell you, when I was first contacted to review these products I told them I’d review it because I knew my readers with young children would love it, but my own kids are much too old. Yet, when I downloaded the app and started playing it, my 14 year old son appeared beside me and within seconds was asking if he could play with it, too. Jajaja… Here’s a video to give you an idea of what the app is like. My favorite part of it is where you can hear the song “Los Pollitos Dicen” not just in English and Spanish, but in French, Portuguese, Italian, Japanese, and several other languages!

pollitos-languages

All the singers in each language sing so lovely, which is nice, because sometimes with these musical bilingual products I’m not that impressed with the voice. These are voices I would actually enjoy listening to if I had a little kid playing the song over and over again, as little kids tend to do.

The app also has this fun little game called “Create a Bouquet” where you add flower blooms and other objects to flower stems and it’s just so pretty. All I can tell you is that when you check out Canticos, you will see how much heart and soul was put into it. By the way, for every Canticos book purchased, the company will donate a portion of the proceeds to preschool programs across the U.S. to help low-income families in need.

Here’s a link to learn more about Canticos, as well as a giveaway so you can enter to win a copy of the book and app!

===GIVEAWAY CLOSED! CONGRATS TO MARIA RAITI!===

Giveaway Details

Prize description: One lucky winner will receive a copy of the book LOS POLLITOS / LITTLE CHICKIES by Susie Jaramillo, as well as a download code for the app.

How to enter: Leave a comment below with your favorite nursery rhyme (Latin American or otherwise!)

Official Rules: No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years of age or older to enter. You must be able to provide a U.S. address for prize shipment. Your name and address will only be shared with the person responsible for prize fulfillment for that purpose. Please no P.O. Boxes. One entry per household. Make sure that you enter a valid email address in the email address field so you can be contacted if you win. Winner will be selected at random. Winner has 24 hours to respond. If winner does not respond within 24 hours, a new winner will be selected at random. Giveaway entries are being accepted between July 26th, 2016 through July 31st, 2016. Entries received after July 31st, 2016 at 11:59 pm EST, will not be considered. The number of eligible entries received determines the odds of winning. If you win, by accepting the prize, you are agreeing that Latinaish.com assumes no liability for damages of any kind. By entering your name below you are agreeing to these Official Rules. Void where prohibited by law.

Buena suerte / Good luck!

Whistle Speakers of the Chinantec Language

whistle-language

While it’s only anecdotal, I can say in my own experience I’ve noticed the Latin Americans I know use whistling a lot more than any other group. There are whistles to get people’s attention, whistles of appreciation, and whistles the equivalent of cursing someone out, just to name a few. And Carlos, for example, is able to whistle through his lips, through his teeth, or with his first two fingers in his mouth to produce different pitches and tones.

Over the years I’ve recognized the usefulness of these whistles to get each other’s attention in crowds where shouting might be too harsh. Sometimes when we grocery shop and Carlos goes off to get an item, I’ll have moved on to another aisle before he gets back. I can see him from a distance looking around for me, but he doesn’t see me – so I whistle, and just like that, he’s able to locate me. It’s interesting to note that just like one’s voice is unique, so too is their whistle. Carlos has whistled in a crowd and instantly I knew it was him because of the tone, just as if he had called my name.

So, when I learned that there are actual whistled languages, I was fascinated, but not surprised. Whistle languages can be found around the world, and many exist or existed in Latin America. In the foggy, mountainous terrain of San Pedro Sochiapam in Oaxaca, Mexico, the male speakers of Chinantec speak a whistled version of the language.

The sad thing about this language, like many indigenous languages, is that it’s in danger of dying. While women understand it, and some children speak a little of it, most of the people of the town don’t use the language like the older generation did. Reasons for declining use of whistled Chinantec range from the fact that children learn Spanish in school and they don’t work in the fields, to advancements in technology such as walkie talkies, megaphones, and telephones. According to Dr. Mark Sicoli, Assistant Professor of Linguistics at Georgetown University, the whistled language “may be gone from this community within ten years.”

Watch this interesting and beautiful episode of “In the Americas with David Yetman” called “Chiflidos en la neblina” [Whistles in the mist] to learn more about the whistle speakers of the Chinantec language in Oaxaca, Mexico.

And here’s another, shorter video on the same town which ends on a happier note, as it seems some of the younger generation have taken it upon themselves to not only learn the language and use it, but are planning to teach it to others.

Related Links

Other episodes of In The Americas with David Yetman are just as great. The website is here, which includes video highlights of each season.

Hat tip: OpenCulture.com

Learn more about other whistled languages on Wikipedia

In a Remote Mexican Town People Can Communicate by Whistling on Fusion.net

Changing Accents & The Chameleon Effect

Shakira and fellow Colombian singer, Carlos Vives, May 2016

Shakira and fellow Colombian singer, Carlos Vives, May 2016

I saw recently on the news that famous Colombian Shakira was getting some flack for “forgetting her roots.” It turns out, Colombian fans overheard Shakira on the set of a music video speaking with a Spanish accent, rather than her native accent from Barranquilla, Colombia.

Here’s video of the interaction that had some people jumping to judgement.

At 35 seconds into the video you hear Shakira say, “¿Pueden ayudar, por favor?” and apparently some detected the accent there.

This isn’t a new accusation for Shakira, as years ago she was also accused of using an Argentinian accent.

So what’s the deal? Has Shakira forgotten her roots? Does she feel the Argentinian and Spanish accents are superior to her native Colombian accent? Is she being pretentious?

Not at all! What some people don’t realize is that being around people with an accent different than your own can have this effect on some people. It isn’t a coincidence that during the time Shakira seemed to have a bit of an Argentinian accent she was dating Argentine Antonio de la Rúa, and as everyone knows, she now shares her life in Barcelona with Spanish football star, Gerard Piqué.

What Shakira is experiencing is called “mirroring” or the “Chameleon Effect.”

Research has shown that humans unintentionally mirror each other, imitating gestures, body language, and accent. This is a way we subconsciously try to get people to like us, to build rapport, and to seem less threatening. Essentially we’re saying to the other person, I’m similar to you, I belong. You can see this taking place between humans as early as infancy. Ever seen a baby imitating facial expressions?

It’s also been found that people who are more empathetic tend to be more prone to the Chameleon Effect, so is it any wonder Shakira has this “problem”? Look at all the charity work she does, from her own Pies Descalzos Foundation which helps children living in poverty, to her benefit concerts which have served as fundraisers for numerous initiatives, and her role as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador – Shakira is definitely one empathetic individual.

If that’s not enough to change the minds of the skeptical, I’ll add my own personal anecdote. Yes, I have also experienced the Chameleon Effect. I still remember the year we went to my parents’ house for Thanksgiving. Carlos and I had been married probably about five years at that point. I was speaking to my father and he looked at me kind of funny. When I finished talking he said, “You’re speaking with an accent.” That was the first time I become self-conscious of it, but he was right, I had picked up some of Carlos’s accent in English which made me sound vaguely like it wasn’t my own native language. To this day I catch myself sometimes, but who knows how often it happens because I’m just not even aware of it.

Has this ever happened to you? What is your own experience with the Chameleon Effect?

7 Fun Ways to Improve Your Child’s Spanish This Summer

improve-spanish

Disclosure: This is not a sponsored post. No payment, monetary or otherwise, was received by Latinaish.com. This is a guest post with language learning tips from PandaTree which includes a code for a free session for Latinaish readers!

Summertime, and the living is easy; or at least that’s how George Gershwin’s song goes. If your kids are learning a foreign language, it can be challenging to keep up their language practice during the summer. Kids can lose one to several months of learning over the summer, which means they spend time catching up in the fall instead of making new progress. Luckily, you can turn summer into a chance to maintain – and even deepen – their language skills without losing out on any of the fun.

1. Traveling to a Spanish-Speaking Destination

Maybe this is just the excuse you needed to visit a new place, learn about another culture and give your children a chance to practice Spanish in the process. Dos tacos, por favor! Immersing yourself in a different culture can be a great motivator – and a lot of fun for the whole family. If a trip isn’t in the cards, try regularly visiting a Latin American or Spanish restaurant or looking for local events celebrating Spanish-speaking cultures.

2. Summer Camps

Similarly, foreign language camps can provide an immersion environment and boost language skills. Your child can build friendships and make connections with other children studying a foreign language.

3. Books on Tape

Long car rides – or hanging out in the hammock – are perfect times to listen to audio books. Choosing a book your child has already read in English can be helpful because knowing the plot line helps with comprehension if they don’t know all the words. Check your local library for Spanish audiobooks. Audible.com also has quite a large selection of a selection of Spanish audiobooks for kids.

4. Spanish Game Night

If you speak some Spanish, try turning a family game night into a Spanish theme. Games like Bananagrams, Scrabble, Pictionary and even card games are fun to play in Spanish, and no need to buy a Spanish version. You can also play games while on the road, like I Spy or Twenty Questions. Or play an alphabet game where a player has to think of a word starting with the last letter of the previous player’s word. Everyone’s Spanish will get sharper and you might even have a few laughs.

5. Become the Student

If you don’t speak Spanish yourself, asking your child to be your summer Spanish tutor can benefit both of you. Mark 20 minutes on your calendar a couple of times a week for you to be a willing pupil. Your child can even use some of the materials they covered in school as teaching aids. Not only is teaching someone else a great way to reinforce your child’s own learning, your child will gain a new perspective on the learning process. Even parents don’t learn things instantly – it takes practice and making mistakes is part of the process. By seeing you model a positive growth mindset your child will pick up some important learning strategies in the process.

6. Find Someone to Practice With

Conversation practice is crucial for developing language fluency and one of the best ways to help your child keep up their Spanish language skills over the summer is to find someone for them to practice with. If you speak Spanish at home you’re already doing this, although sometimes as kids get older it can become more difficult to get them to reply in Spanish. If you don’t speak the language yourself, it can be extremely helpful to find a trusted person that your children can practice with. Is there a babysitter or a grandparent they can talk to regularly?

7. PandaTree

One option parents find really convenient is online foreign language video sessions with a native Spanish speaker. It’s a great way for kids to get one-on-one conversation practice. PandaTree.com has made it simple for parents by handpicking tutors who are friendly and engaging to talk with. A few 25 or 50 minute sessions a week can accelerate your child’s skills – and fit conveniently into busy summer schedules with no driving required. Sessions are recorded so parents can review their child’s progress, and parents get updates after each session about what their child covered.

Want to give it a try?

Until June 15, 2016, Latinaish readers can get their first PandaTree session for free!

Just visit PandaTree.com and use promo code Latinaish516

Know it’s Worth the Effort

Whatever approach you choose for keeping your child’s language skills fresh over the summer, know that it is worth the effort. By helping your child learn a foreign language you are giving them a gift for life. Learning a foreign language boosts their brainpower, opens future career doors and deepens their understanding of different cultures as well as their own. So bring on the summer (learning) fun!

Kristina Klausen is the Founder and CEO of PandaTree.com. Her children are learning Mandarin and Spanish. Kristina started PandaTree to help give kids the conversation practice they need to become fluent. One-on-one online video sessions with carefully picked native-fluency tutors are easy to schedule and happen conveniently from home. Sessions are tailored to each child’s interests and language level, and parents receive updates after each session and can even watch recordings to see their child’s progress.

Ancestry DNA: Part 4

carlos-2016

In Part 1 and Part 2, I took you through the process and results of my own DNA test with Ancestry.com – Now it’s Carlos’s turn! Check out Part 3 for Carlos’s thoughts before taking the test. Part 4 (this final post) is Carlos’s results!

Carlos’s results are in! His took much longer to arrive, (40 days compared to the 22 days I waited.) Maybe the Ancestry DNA test has become more popular since I did mine. At first I thought maybe it was taking so long because we did it around Saint Patrick’s Day and you tend to see a lot of their commercials encouraging people to see if they have Irish ancestry around that time of year, but that can’t be it, because I also did mine around Saint Patrick’s Day last year. While we were waiting for the results, Carlos joked that it was taking so long because they discovered he’s el eslabón perdido (“the missing link”) and they were busy gathering researchers from around the world, which was a very Carlos-ish joke to make.

Anyway, I won’t keep you in more suspense than is necessary. Let’s get to the results!

When I asked Carlos if he had any predictions, he had answered, “Maybe that I’m mostly indigenous” – And it turns out he was correct! Carlos is 57% Native American. It’s just a shame that Ancestry DNA can’t go into more detail than that.

native

We can assume this is most likely Central American tribes descended from the Mayan and/or Aztec, but we really have no way of knowing for sure.

Carlos also got 27% Europe. Unsurprisingly the majority of that (16%) is from the Iberian Peninsula.

iberian-peninsula

What about the rest of that 27% though? That’s where we start getting some interesting results.

4% Italy/Greece
3% Great Britain
2% European Jewish
2% Ireland

This means Carlos and I have some ancestry in common! (It also means I can no longer pinch him on Saint Patrick’s Day for not being Irish.)

italy-greece

great-britain

European-Jewish

Ireland

We’ve got 16% left, any guesses before we go on?

Well, here’s some more surprises. Carlos is 12% African.

The breakdown is:

North Africa 5%
Senegal 2%
Mali 2%
Ivory Coast/Ghana 2%
Africa Southeastern Bantu 1%

And here are the maps with more detailed information on those:

africa-north

senegal

mali

ivory-coast-ghana

africa-bantu

Now we have just 4% left, and that is broken down as:

Caucausus 3%
Middle East < 1%

caucasus

middle-east

That’s it! Here’s a picture of the full breakdown (including expanded trace regions) and the world map showing all his ancestral areas:

carlos-regions-expanded

carlos-dna-map

A few last questions with Carlos:

Tracy: Which result surprised you the most?
Carlos: Jewish and Irish.

Tracy: Has this changed anything for you? How you see yourself? How you see the world?
Carlos: I don’t know yet. I’m still kind of processing it.

Tracy: Was there anything you were disappointed not to see?
Carlos: Well, I’m not disappointed, but I’m surprised that I’m not East Asian at all. I was kind of expecting I would be because of the way my [paternal] grandmother looked. I also wish the technology was advanced enough to give me more detail about the Native American result.

Tracy: What is your advice to other people considering doing the Ancestry DNA test?
Carlos: I recommend it, they should do it.

The Bilingual Household: Changing Family Dynamics and The End of an Era

On my older son's future college campus.

On my older son’s future college campus.

Family dynamics are complicated in any household, but in a bilingual household, even more so. The addition or subtraction of one member can change everything – and I think that is what we’re getting ready to face in our family as our oldest son prepares to go off to college.

For the first time in our youngest son’s life, he will be the only child, (at least in respect to who will be physically living under our roof day-to-day.) This creates an interesting opportunity. With his brother around, he had a willing “accomplice” to speak English to. Despite my best efforts, having two people speaking English all the time has made it difficult for me (a native English speaker) to remain consistent with Spanish. It’s like when you go on a diet, but the rest of the family keeps eating cake and Doritos right in front of you — it makes sliding back into comfortable habits much more difficult to resist.

My prediction is that when my older son goes off to college, it will become easier to maintain a better balance of Spanish in the household because I’ve seen it happen before when he went off to summer camp. With only me to talk to (and Carlos usually at work), my younger son ends up speaking Spanish more easily without his brother around. Although I’ve long given up on a “100% Spanish only” household, I think a realistic expectation is that we could get closer to 50/50. Right now, unfortunately, I would say we’re down to 80/20, (Eighty percent English, twenty percent Spanish… no bueno.)

While I have my eye on this new possibility of fluency for our younger son, of course I’m also dealing with the emotional aspect of closing a chapter in our lives. There’s the expected mix of pride and bitter-sweetness at seeing our son grown up and ready to go off into the world, but there’s also a sort of ticking clock feeling, like our days together are numbered. Of course our days have always been numbered, but they felt infinite until only a handful remained, which is where we’re at right now. When time begins to run out, as a parent you start to think about all the things you’ve taught your child to prepare them, and all the things that somehow, regretfully, you never got around to teaching them.

I think we did well. We’ve taught him to be kind to others, confident, to make good choices, to be self-sufficient. We’ve taught him to be true to himself, to always ask questions, we’ve encouraged his passions. We’ve done everything we could to make sure he was well-rounded, well-educated, and knew his roots, but this “raising bilingual children” experiment which has gone on for the past 18 years is coming to an end. Was that part of our parenting successful?

The answer isn’t immediately apparent, but I’ve decided success isn’t always a pass/fail sort of thing.

While I do mourn the fact that native speaker fluency wasn’t in the cards for him, I can honestly say we gave it a good shot, and I’m content with the results. Maybe he can’t read and fully enjoy a novel in Spanish, and maybe he doesn’t dream in Spanish. Maybe he doesn’t always understand every single word, but if we were to drop him off alone in a Spanish-speaking city, I have no doubt he would be able to get about just fine on his own. He talks to his abuela on the phone without a problem, and he has lost count of how many Spanish-speaking customers he assisted at his part-time retail job. Do I wish he was fluent? Does he wish he was fluent? Of course.

But we’ve given him what we were able to, and like so much else in his life, the rest is now up to him.

Conversations at Casa López – Part 9

casalopez-2

Here we go – my family’s most recent “bilingual moments” and funny conversations. (Be sure to share your recent funny conversations in comments!)

Telivision/Boxing Match: …the new champion, de Sinaloa México, Gilberto “El Zurdo” Rámirez!

Tracy: Wow, he’s deaf?

[Confusing the word “sordo” which means deaf, and “zurdo” which means southpaw/left-handed]

Tracy: You see? That bird has the same beak as that one. They’re both Cardinals but that one is a female, the red ones are males.

Carlos: Beak?

Tracy: Beak, pico.

Carlos: But that’s how you pronounce it? Like Vick-Vaporu?

Television/Chavo: Es que la Chilindrina me preguntó ¿con que “v”?
Television/Doña Florinda: Pos, con los ojos.
Television/Chavo: Sí, pero, ¿de vaca o de burro?

Tracy and Carlos: [laughing]

14 year old son: What’s funny?

Tracy: Chavo wanted to know whether you write “bicicleta” with a “v” or a “b” because they sound the same in Spanish and they call them “big b” and “little v”, or you can say “b de burro, o v de vaca” – so he asked Doña Florinda “Con que v?” which sounds like “What do you use to see?” and when Doña Florinda said “ojos”, Chavo said “cow eyes or donkey eyes?”

14 year old son: [blank stare]

Tracy: It kind of gets lost in translation.

Tracy: El Salvador is north of the equator, right?

Carlos: Right.

Tracy: Wait, so which country does the equator pass through?

Carlos: [amused expression] Ecuador.

Tracy: Oh my God…I feel stupid now.

17 year old son: What’re you watching?

Carlos: It’s about Billy the Kid.

17 year old son: [sits down to watch]

Carlos: Didn’t you study him in school?

17 year old son: I was more into Jesse James.

Carlos: Is he a gang bang, too?

Tracy: We’re almost out of bird feed again.

Carlos: Again?!

Tracy: It’s those big, black birds – the Grackles. I think they’re eating it all. I read that they’ve been known to devastate crops, they come down as a huge flock and eat everything.

Carlos: Ohhhh, those are the ones that do that?

Tracy: Do they do that in El Salvador, too?

Carlos: I don’t know.

Tracy: How do you know about them then?

Carlos: There was an episode of Pink Panther…

(Here’s the episode of Pink Panther if anyone wants to watch. I had to look it up after that conversation, and then watching it made it even funnier.)